Academic Catalog

Allied Health Professions

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degrees

Health Care Management (AHM)

The Health Care Management curriculum prepares students for management roles in a rapidly changing health care environment. Once focused on episodes of treatment for acute disease, the health care industry now emphasizes lifelong health maintenance and wellness promotion. The program is intended for health care workers who require new knowledge and skills to compete in the changing health care marketplace. It will also be useful for those individuals with no previous health care experience who seek non-clinical entry-level positions in health care, or who plan to continue their education in the field of health care administration.

An Associate in Applied Science will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all Allied Health and Nursing (AHN) courses.

Health Studies (HSTU)

The Associate of Applied Science in Health Studies is designed to offer students interested in working within the health care field an opportunity to attain the associate degree. Students acquiring this degree would be able to pursue advancement opportunities within varied health care settings. Examples of positions that would be applicable include: Billing Supervisor, Patient Service Representative, Medical Administrative Assistant, Medical Supply Manager and Allied Health Instructor. This program is especially advantageous for students who have completed certificates of competency and proficiency programs offered by the Allied Health and Nursing department and wish to complete a degreed course of study. The program offers a broad view of health care related topics while providing a basic liberal study foundation.

An Associate in Applied Science will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all Allied Health and Nursing (AHN) courses.

Upon completion of this curriculum students are eligible to sit for the CMRS (Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist) exam. The CMRS designation is awarded by the Certifying Board of the American Medical Billing Association (CBAMBA).

Medical Assistant (MED)

The Medical Assistant program prepares students as multi-skilled health care workers who function as assistants to physicians and other health care professionals in a variety of ambulatory care settings. The responsibilities of the medical assistant include administrative and clinical duties.

An Associate in Applied Science will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all Allied Health and Nursing (AHN) courses.

 
DCCC clinical at Crozer Hospital

Surgical Technology (ORT)

The goal of this Surgical Technology program is to prepare students with the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to gain employment as entry-level surgical technologists and become contributing members of the health care team to function under the supervision of professional registered nurses or licensed physicians. This will be accomplished by

  1. preparing competent graduates in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective learning domains and
  2. meeting or exceeding the criteria set forth in the current Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Program (CAAHEP) Standards and Guidelines for the Accreditation of Educational Programs in Surgical Technology.

The program includes courses in general and technical education. Selected clinical experiences are provided in local hospitals under the supervision of a member of the surgical technology clinical faculty.

An associate in applied science degree will be awarded upon successful completion of the required program with a “C” or better in all surgical technology courses.

Associate in Science (AS) Degrees

Science for Health Professions (HSCI)

The Science for Health Professions Program is designed for students who plan to transfer and continue their education in an allied health or pre-medical field at another institution. It provides the basic sciences and mathematics needed for a variety of programs, including Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Baccalaureate Nursing, Physician Assistant, Pharmacy, Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine, Optometry and Podiatry. Since admission requirements to other institutions vary, students should obtain information on entrance requirements for the specific school and program in which they are interested. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with both the Transfer Office at DCCC and their advisor regarding the best course selections for their transfer.

 

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Medical Assistant (CMED)

The Medical Assistant program prepares students as multi-skilled health care workers who function as assistants to physicians and other health care professionals in a variety of ambulatory care settings. The responsibilities of the medical assistant include administrative and clinical duties.

A Medical Assistant, Certificate of Proficiency will be awarded upon successful completion of the required program with a 2.0 G.P.A. and a “C” or better in all allied health courses (AHM and AHA).

Perioperative Nursing (NURP)

The knowledge and techniques necessary to assume responsibilities of the perioperative nurse are emphasized in this broad-based yet comprehensive orientation to the operating room and the perioperative role. Standards of patient care in the operating room are explored and identified. Assessment of patient needs and implementation of nursing interventions are emphasized. Collaborative decision making is reviewed relative to total intraoperative care. Subject material guides the learner to provide for and contribute to patient safety through control of internal and external environment, biological testing and product evaluation, as well as to assist the patient with the management of anxiety through the principles of biological, physical and social sciences. The College recognizes the standards of perioperative nursing practice of the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) as the conceptual basis of specialty practice in the operating room. All levels of registered nurses may attend the perioperative nursing classes with a current, valid nursing license in the state in which they will perform their perioperative nursing practicum. NCLEX eligible graduate nurses may also apply to the perioperative nursing program.

A certificate will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all Allied Health and Nursing (AHN) courses.

RN First Assistant in Surgery

The knowledge and technique necessary to assuming responsibilities of the RN First Assistant in Surgery (RNFA) are emphasized. The role of the first assistant is explored in its interdependent relationship, as the nurse works both with the physician and for the benefit of the patient. The nursing diagnosis is used as the defining guide in planning and implementing patient care. Expanded functions are stressed and elaborated as the nurse is prepared to assume responsibility in scrubbing, draping, retracting, exposing, clamping, ligating and suturing. Intellectual and manual dexterity are combined to prepare the nurse with the essential skills necessary to this expanded professional role.

To qualify of the RN First Assistant Program, students must be a perioperative registered nurse with two (2) years of perioperative nursing experience, have achieved certification in perioperative nursing (CNOR) or be eligible to take the CNOR Exam, or be a certified Nurse Practitioner, or certified Nurse Midwife.

An Associate in Applied Science will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all Allied Health and Nursing (AHN) courses.

View full A-Z Course List

AHA - Health Administration

AHA 206  Reimbursement and Financing in Managed Care  

Health care is the largest service industry in the United States. Healthcare managers are controllers of significant financial resources that must be managed with an eye toward the bottom line in a highly competitive marketplace. They must fully understand current financial trends in reimbursement for services provided. This course provides information on the impact of various forces on the financing of healthcare. It also explores reimbursement trends and issues from the perspective of providers, payers, and consumers of health. Special focus in this course is on managed care impact on reimbursements.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Use correct terminology in discussing the financial aspects of health care.
Develop a format for capital budget planning.
Formulate a budget request.
Identify the implications of managed competition and global budgeting on reimbursement initiatives.
Analyze the impact of health care reform and changed governmental reimbursement strategies on department management.
Evaluate the effects of cost containment measures used by multiple entities in the health care continuum.
Describe the emerging methods of reimbursement in fee-for-service and managed care environments.

Prerequisites: AHA 209 and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHA 207  Ethical/Legal Aspects of Health Care Management  

Rapid advances in medical technology challenge legal and ethical standards, and lend to situations requiring moral decisions. This course provides the student with an introduction to law, ethics and bioethics as they apply to decision making in the health care setting. It is not the intent to provide the student with right or wrong answers for ethical issues. Emphasis is on use of appropriate language, application of ethical principles, and use of critical-thinking skills to articulate a point of view on current issues in health care.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Use appropriate terminology to discuss ethical/legal issues in health care.
Explain the nature of human value development.
Analyze common theories and methods used in making ethical decisions.
Explore ethical/legal positions that pertain to current controversies in health care.
Describe legal concepts of concern to the health care manager.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHA 209  Philosophy of Managed Care  

Managed care is now mainstreamed in America's healthcare system and has changed the delivery of healthcare services. Individuals working in the healthcare arena need to understand the impact of managed care on patients and providers. This course will review the evolution of managed care, explore how it works, contemplate its future and discuss the ethical issues surrounding it today. The roles and responsibilities of the case manager will be investigated as well. The topic of Utilization Review will also be introduced in this course. It is essential for healthcare facilities to be able to control and manage the use of their services to minimize the risk of financial loss. Utilization Review monitors and provides appropriate incentives to influence the use of heatlhcare services. Managed care and Utilization Review are tools to coordinate and measure the delivery of cost effective quality care and have the potential to achieve significant containment of healthcare costs, an essential outcome in our present health care system.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe key concepts of the philosophy of managed care.
Explain the shift from the fee-for service model to capitation.
Use the specific terminology related to managed care models.
Identify critical components in developing and implementing treatment plans.
Explain the function of critical pathways and disease management strategies.
Define the roles and responsibilities of the case manager and or healthcare provider in client advocacy and ethical decision making.
Trace the history and development of the utilization review processes.
Describe the requirements for utilization review procedures in relation to payer organizations, Managed Care, Medicare, Medical Assistance and private insurers.
Examine the role of physician and other health care personnel in resource management.
List the various mechanisms used in the resource management process by payer and provider organizations.
Discuss the role of the health care manager in the utilization review process.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060) and AHA 207 and AHM 102 and AHM 233. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM - Allied Health Medical

AHM 102  Introduction to Health Care  

This course provides an overview of the organization, financing, regulatory and delivery of different healthcare services. The role of various health care professionals is examined. The purpose, use, maintenance, and regulations associated with health information systems is emphasized throughout the course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the major health care organizations and agencies and their role in the health care delivery system.
Identify the role of members of the health care team.
Describe the major components involved in the payment/reimbursement process.
Identify government payment programs.
Describe the role of information technology on practice management.
Define the basic terminology associated with health information and health information technology.
Identify the legal, ethical, privacy, security and confidentially issues and practices applicable to health information.
List the data that are included in a health information record.
List various measures of health care quality.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 104  Body Structure and Function I  

This course begins with an analysis of the structural foundation of the body and its ability to function integrating the levels of organization: chemical cellular, tissue, organ, and system. The course then emphasizes the anatomical structure, physiology, and selective disease processes specific to the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, lymphatic, circulatory, and respiratory systems. Mechanisms by which the body maintains fluid and electrolyte balance and acid base balance are also emphasized. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Scientific Inquiry (SI) when taken with AHM 105 and AHM 220

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the architectural plan of the human body as a whole, the organization of its functional units, and the mechanisms by which it performs its various activities.
Discuss the mechanism and patterns of disease-causing pathogens and neoplasms, and the body's response to threat of injury and disease.
Explain the function and interrelationship of fluids and electrolytes, the mechanisms by which the constancy of total body fluids is maintained, and regulation of the acid-base balance.
Describe the structure and function of the integumentary system and major disorders of this system.
Describe the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems as well as disorders of these systems.
Describe the structure and function of the circulatory and lymphatic systems as well as disorders of these systems.
Describe the structure and function of the respiratory system as well as disorders of this system.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Scientific Reasoning (SI)

Corequisites: AHM 233.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 105  Body Structure and Function II  

This course emphasizes the anatomical structure, physiology, and selective disease processes specific to the digestive system, urinary system, nervous system and sense organs, endocrine system, and reproductive systems. How nutrition, growth, development, aging, and genetics influence body structure and function is also emphasized. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Scientific Inquiry (SI) when taken with AHM 104 and AHM 220

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the structure and function of the digestive system as well as disorders of this system.
Describe adequate nutrition and the complex mechanism of metabolism, as well as disorders associated with eating and metabolism.
Describe the structure and function of the urinary system and major disorders of this system.
Describe the structure and function of the nervous system and disorders of this system.
Describe the mechanisms by which the sense organs are able to sense changes in our external and internal environments as a requirement for maintaining homeostasis; and diseases commonly affecting the sense organs.
Describe the structure and function of the endocrine system and major disorders of this system.
Describe the structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, and briefly describe the major disorders inherent to these systems as well as the major disorders associated with pregnancy.
Describe the concept of development as a biological process characterized by continuous modification and change as well as the effects of aging on major body organ systems.
Describe genetics, the scientific study of inheritance, and its relationship to human disease.
Describe the physiology of congenital diseases and the roles that heredity and environmental factors play in the development of these conditions.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Scientific Reasoning (SI)

Corequisites: AHM 233.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 106  Medical Assistant Techniques and Practicum I  

This course is structured to prepare the student to assist the physician in the clinic, outpatient office and ambulatory health care settings. The responsibilities include preparation of the client for examination, measurement of basic body functions, assistance in diagnostic testing and procedures, and general clinical procedures performed in the medical office.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the role and function of the medical assistant in the health care delivery system.
Evaluate the impact of disease and disease causing organisms on man and his environment.
Describe the role of the medical assistant in assisting with physical measurements.
Perform the duties necessary to assist the physician with the health history and physical examination.
Understand the role of the medical assistant in the collecting and handling of specimens.
Analyze the role of the medical assistant in assisting the physician in minor surgery.
Understand the importance of nutrition, exercise, and diet therapy to the well being of the patient.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

4 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

AHM 107  Medical Assistant Techniques and Practicum II  

The course prepares students to assist the physician in the clinic, outpatient office and ambulatory health care setting. Responsibilities include administration of medications, phlebotomy, and aiding in diagnostic tests and procedures commonly performed in the medical office.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the role and the responsibility of the Medical Assistant concerning the principles of pharmacology and drug administration.
Classify the commonly used diagnostic laboratory procedures that are utilized in a physician's office.
Classify the commonly used diagnostic radiological procedures that are utilized in the physician's office.
Describe the role of the Medical Assistant in the recording of an EKG and other cardiac tests.
Describe the role of the Medical Assistant in assisting with therapeutic modalities, rehabilitative procedures, orthopedic medicine and physical therapy.
Evaluate the role of the Medical Assistant during a medical emergency and in preparing for an emergency situation.

Prerequisites: AHM 106.

4 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

AHM 109  Medical Assistant Review Practicum I  

This course is structured to provide the student with a review of the simulation laboratory experience in assisting the physician in the clinic, hospital or private office. Clinical skills covered include preparation of the client for examination, measurement of basic body functions, assistance in diagnostic testing and procedures, and general patient care procedures performed in the medical office.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the role and function of the medical assistant in the health care delivery system.
Describe the role of the medical assistant in assisting with physical measurements.
Analyze the role of the medical assistant in assisting the physician with the health history and physical examination.
Understand the role of the medical assistant in the collecting and handling of specimens.
Analyze the role of the medical assistant in assisting the physician in minor surgery.

Prerequisites: AHM 106.

1 Credit
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

AHM 110  Medical Assistant Review Practicum II  

The course prepares students with simulation laboratory experience in assisting the physician in the clinic, hospital or private office. Responsibilities include preparation of the client for examination, measurements of body functions, aiding in diagnostic tests and procedures, and general operation of the office.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the principles of pharmacology and drug administration.
Perform diagnostic laboratory procedures that are utilized in a physician's office.
Perform an EKG.
Describe the role of the medical assistant in assisting with physical therapy.
Evaluate the role of the medical assistant during a medical emergency and giving first aid.

Prerequisites: AHM 106 and AHM 107.

1 Credit
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

AHM 130  Medical Coding Concepts for Allied Health  

This course, for non-coding majors, is designed to teach students general principles of ICD-CM (International Classification of Disease) And CPT-4 (Current Procedural Terminology) coding. Students will learn to translate medical terminology and descriptions into code numbers. In this course will focus on coding for both inpatient and outpatient procedures and diagnoses. Emphasis will be placed on accuracy of coding in a variety of settings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the organization of both the ICD-CM manual and CPT-4 manual.
Transform descriptions of diagnostic terms and symptoms into correct ICD-CM codes.
Transform outpatient procedures for laboratory (pathology), diagnostic testing and outpatient surgical procedures into valid CPT-4 codes.
Follow rules and guidelines for selecting the current ICD-CM and CPT-4 codes.
Use correct codes relating to health conditions and factors from the ICD-CM manual.
Identify and use the HCPCS (Health Common Procedural Coding System) for Medicare patients.
Describe the DRG system and why it is of importance.

Prerequisites: AHM 233.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 140  Professional and Communication Issues in Health Care  

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to communicate effectively in the health care setting. Emphasis is on development of interpersonal skills for workplace and therapeutic communication. Among the topics covered are basic communication skills, conflict resolution, cultural awareness, confidentiality, and professionalism.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply basic principles of communication in responding to verbal and nonverbal communication.
Respond appropriately to issues of confidentiality in the health care setting.
Demonstrate knowledge of federal and state health care legislation and regulations.
Describe professionalism in relation to the health care setting.
Explain the role of alternative and complimentary medicine in health care.
Develop transcultural communication skills.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 185  Medical Office Management  

This course is structured for the Medical Assisting and other Administrative Health Professions and introduces students to the administrative procedures commonly performed in a health care setting. Emphasis on medical ethics and legal considerations, a history of medicine, communication skills, managing accounts payable and receivable, electronic health records, receptionist responsibility, operational functions and workplace dynamics will help prepare the student for entry-level office management. Coursework will be presented and completed in both manual and computerized formats, so that the student will have a more comprehensive understanding of an administrative health care facility and its procedures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the ethical and legal responsibilities of a medical office administrator.
Demonstrate effective oral and written communication both with professionals and patients.
Utilize electronic health record software applications in the health care setting.
Use and understand systems of maintaining patient clinical and financial records.
Perform office tasks appropriate for computer solutions.
Organize and maintain the physical requirements of a medical office.

Prerequisites: AHM 233 and DPR 100.

4 Credits3.5 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

AHM 198  Medical Coding Internship  

Selected medical coding experiences are provided in a healthcare facility or insurance company. Knowledge and guidelines basic to applying correct coding systems for appropriate reimbursement are stressed. NOTE: All certificate program requirements in the Medical Coding or Medical Coding for the Healthcare Professional must be completed before taking this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Maintain ethical and legal standards of a Medical Coding ProfessionalDemonstrate the ability to use computer applications and technology relating to Medical Billing and Coding.
Interpret and evaluate data in the Electronic Medical Record while searching for deficiencies in demographic and/or insurance information.
Apply correct coding systems for appropriate reimbursement.
Evaluate coding procedures for achievement of optimal quality in seeking appropriate reimbursement.
Create a portfolio to demonstrate professional skills to enhance marketability for employment.

3 Credits

AHM 199  Medical Assistant Externship  

Selected clinical experiences are provided in a medical office or health care facility. This is a planned activity that must be scheduled with the coordinator of the Medical Assistant program. This course is offered spring, summer session I and II semesters.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the anatomical structure and physiological functioning of the human body and of medical terms descriptive of body systems.
Apply the business/administrative and clinical duties of the medical assistant.
Function as an assistant to the physician in a medical and/or other health care setting.
Implement the ethical and legal responsibilities of the medical assistant in the health care delivery system.
Apply selected principles of biophysical and psychosocial sciences in providing assistance to the physician.
Maintain business and patient health records.
Discuss the fundamental concepts of disease

6 Credits
 30 Weekly Lab Hours

AHM 202  Fundamentals of Health Information Technology Science  

This course is an introduction to the Health Information Management (HIM) profession and the patient health record. Some of the topics covered are functions of the health record, content and structure of the health record, analysis of health records and health information, health care data sets, data access and retention, storage and retrieval systems, forms and screen design, and indexes and registers. Information is presented for both the paper-based and electronic health record.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the purpose, structure, Code of Ethics and certification processes of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).
Differentiate the roles of Health Information Management (HIM) professionals.
Describe the workflow of records within a HIM Department.
Differentiate between the functions and uses of primary and secondary health records.
Identify the basic forms and formats for collection of patient information in various health care facilities.
Evaluate and apply principles of forms design.
Describe the purposes and techniques related to record analysis, including quantitative, qualitative, and legal.
Compare different storage and retrieval systems.
Discuss what forces are driving the adoption of electronic health records.
Identify the legal.
ethical.
privacy, security and confidentiality issues and practices as they apply to health information.

Prerequisites: AHM 102.

3 Credits4 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 208  Pathophysiology and Pharmacology  

This course provides students with opportunities to learn fundamental concepts of disease processes followed by further study of specific diseases as they relate to a developmental stage or body system. Pathophysiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic and laboratory procedures, and treatment modalities, including pharmacology are emphasized.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the disease process, including causes of disease, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment modalities.
Explain the physiology, assessment and management of pain.
Describe common infectious diseases and neoplasms.
Describe common congenital diseases and mental health disorders.
Correlate the pathophysiology with the etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases for each human body system.
Classify commonly used medications by action and body system.
Identify the routes of administration, indications, adverse effects, and related laboratory studies of commonly used medications.

Prerequisites: AHM 233 and (AHM 104 or AHM 105 or BIO 150).

4 Credits4 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 220  Applied Microbiology  

This is a survey course intended for allied health majors. This 1 credit course contains microbiological information and skills needed for the allied health professions. This course differs from a traditional 4 credit microbiology course in that the 4 credit course emphasizes general microbiology for science majors, whereas the 1 credit applied microbiology course emphasizes concepts for students entering health professions. The concepts of specimen collection and transport, identification of microorganisms, pathogenesis, and control, and treatment of infectious disease are the main emphasis of the course. Clinical laboratory experiences will emphasize application of concepts to skills. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Scientific Inquiry (SI) when taken with AHM 104 and AHM 105

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the relationship between the structure and function of microorganisms.
Describe techniques of microbial control.
Apply principles of sterile technique in specimen collection and performing laboratory procedures in the microbiology lab.
Describe the distribution of normal and pathogenic flora for different body sites.
Discuss antibiotic treatment for disease.
Classify and perform diagnostic procedures of body fluid specimens.
Describe the structure and function of the skeletal and muscular systems as well as disorders of these systems.
Describe the structure and function of the circulatory and lymphatic systems as well as disorders of these systems.
Describe the structure and function of the respiratory system as well as disorders of this system.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Scientific Reasoning (SI)

1 Credit0.67 Weekly Lecture Hours
 0.33 Weekly Lab Hours

AHM 231  Introduction to CPT Coding  

The primary focus of this course is to provide students the principles, guidelines and application of The Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding system. CPT is the coding system used to describe services provided by physicians. CPT is also used for services provided by hospital outpatient and ancillary departments, hospital emergency departments, and other health care facilities. In addition, students will be introduced to Procedural groupings such as APCs (Ambulatory Payment Classifications) and RUGs (Resource Utilization Groups). This course also addresses reimbursement and compliance issues related to physician-based coding as well as the purpose and application of the CMS (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Healthcare Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCS).

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define terms, phrases and abbreviations related to medical coding.
Apply specific volumes of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and Healthcare Common Procedural Coding Systems as they pertain to the identification of procedures, medications and medical equipment in healthcare facilities.
Apply Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding as they pertain to identification of procedures, medications, and medical equipment in a variety of medical specialties, including but not limited to: Evaluation and Management Coding, Surgery Coding, Pathology and Laboratory Coding, and Radiology coding.
Describe insurance carrier reimbursement systems, such as APCs, RUGs, Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS), Fee-For-Service Payments and Capitation payments.
Apply legal concepts to issues of medical coding.

Prerequisites: (AHM 104 and AHM 105 and AHM 233) or (BIO 150 and BIO 151 and AHM 233).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 232  Advanced CPT Coding  

This course is designed for students who plan to work in the variety of healthcare facilities in departments including medical records, medical coding, medical billing, or other reimbursement and documentation departments. It is intended to provide additional in depth study of coding principles, clinical topics, and case studies to increase knowledge and skills in CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) coding. The use of CMS Healthcare Common Procedural Coding System (HCPCS) is also addressed. Extensive coding of case studies from various medical specialties will be completed in this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Code accurately a medical or surgical operative report, physician office visit (Evaluation and Management) or outpatient procedural case study.
Recognize the economic and ethical implications of coding assignment on reimbursement, and how these are impacted by reimbursement systems such as APC's (Ambulatory Payment Classifications, ASC's (Ambulatory Surgery Center) and RBRVS (Resource Based Relative Value Scale).
Determine if coded data is of optimal quality and evaluate if coded cases require a single code or multiple codes (both CPT and HCPCS codes) as well as analyze sequencing of these codes.

Prerequisites: AHM 231.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 233  Medical Terminology  

This course is designed to introduce the skills and knowledge needed to develop an understanding of the language of medicine. The mechanism of building a medical vocabulary, utilizing roots, prefixes, suffixes, and the combining forms, and the pronunciation are emphasized. A workbook/text, audiotapes, and computer software are used to give the student hands-on experience in the use of the language of medicine.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify word parts and their meanings in medical terms.
Utilize reference materials to determine meaning, usage, and spelling of medical terms.
Describe the main functions of each body system.
Define diagnostic, symptomatic, and therapeutic terms related to each system.
Identify terms describing pathology affecting body systems.
Define anatomical landmarks, directional, positional, and numeric medical terms.
Recognize common classes of drugs and their actions.
Recognize the correct spelling of medical terms.
Develop a medical vocabulary.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 239  Introduction to ICD-10-CM Coding  

This course is designed to teach those interested in learning ICD-10-CM diagnosis coding, the basic skills required to accurately code diagnosis in ICD-10-CM. Students will learn how to interpret and apply the ICD-10-CM guidelines to properly assign diagnosis codes to patient encounters. The ICD-10-CM codebook, textbook class-work, homework activities, and lectures will provide students with hands-on experience in assigning accurate diagnosis codes in ICD-10-CM. NOTE: Students must obtain a grade of "C" or better in this course to successfully complete their program.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the format, convention and chapter specific guidelines to correctly assign ICD-10-CM codes.
Apply general guidelines and chapter specific guidelines to correctly assign ICD-10-CM codes.
Understand the code of ethics for coders.

Prerequisites: AHM 208 and AHM 233 and ((AHM 104 and AHM 105) or (BIO 150 and BIO 151)).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 240  Hospital Coding and Case Studies  

This course is designed for students who plan to work in the Health Information Management (HIM) department of a hospital. It is intended to provide additional in-depth study of inpatient medical record case studies to increase knowledge and skills in ICD-10-CM diagnosis coding. This course will also provide students the opportunities to use and apply ICD-10-PCS coding classification system. Students will learn coding characteristics, conventions and apply guidelines to identify and accurately assign codes to inpatient hospital procedures. NOTE: Students must achieve an overall grade of "C" (70% or above) to receive credit for this course for Allied Health Programs or certificates.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Given a scenario, extract the relevant diagnoses and/or procedures and then accurately and completely code them according to ICD-10-CM guidelines and ICD-10-PCS guidelines.
Apply coding guidelines to accurately code principal diagnoses and procedures to determine the correct diagnosis related group assignments.
Demonstrate the use of ICD-10-CM coding and ICD-10-PCS coding in DRG assignment.
Recognize the economic and ethical implications of coding assignment on reimbursement.

Prerequisites: AHM 239.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 241  Revenue Cycle Management and Reimbursement Methodologies  

This course is designed for students to learn the general principles of revenue cycle management and reimbursement methodologies. Students will learn how to complete and use insurance claim forms and insurance related forms (referrals, pre-authorizations, registration forms). The class will provide students with hands-on experiences with a variety of insurance related issues as well as compliance strategies and reporting. Reimbursement systems including fee-for-service payments and capitation payments will be covered in detail as well as regulatory guidelines, management of denials of claims and chargemaster maintenance.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe legal and ethical issues involved in revenue cycle management and compliance and identifying potential abuse and fraudulent trends through data analysis.
Describe and explain different types of health insurance carriers and reimbursement systems as well as rules and regulations for each (private insurance, managed care, Medicare, Medicaid, Workers Compensation, Military insurance).
Recognize the economic and ethical implications of coding assignment on reimbursement, and how these are impacted by reimbursement systems such as APC's (Ambulatory Payment Classifications, ASC's (Ambulatory Surgery Center) and RBRVS (Resource Based Relative Value Scale).
Accurately complete referral, preauthorization, registration and encounter forms.
Submit claims in paper and electronic format.
Document billing information using correct medical terminology and perform an internal and external chart audit.
Accurately complete referral, preauthorization, registration forms, encounter forms, EOB (explanation of benefits review and analysis) and ABN forms (Advanced Beneficiary Notices).
and ensure appropriate coding as per CMS (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Guidelines).
Resolve claim errors and learn how to resubmit claims that have been rejected.
Generate patient bills when needed through interpretation of explanations of benefits/remittance advice statements.
Describe the process of how to follow up with insurance companies and patients regarding unpaid bills.
Record changes, payments and adjustments for patient scenarios provided.

Prerequisites: AHM 130 or (AHM 231 and AHM 239).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHM 242  Virtual Professional Practice Experience Capstone Course  

This course is designed to have students apply knowledge and skills from their Medical Coding and Billing classes in a comprehensive hands-on experiential learning setting. Through this AHIMA Virtual Practicum, students will have the opportunity to use various software application programs including ATHENS Electronic Health Records software, Quadra Med Encoder Software, McKesson Horizon Master Patient Index Software and 3M Coding and Reimbursement Software. Various experts in the field will lecture on their specific subject areas. This course will also provide students with an opportunity to create a portfolio which will demonstrate employment skills to future employers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to use computer applications and technology related to Medical Billing and Coding.
Analyze, interpret and evaluate data in the medical record to determine correct clinical documentation to support codes used.
Abstract data from electronic medical records and code these records with appropriate ICD, CPT-4 and HCPCS codes and coding from source documents.
Interpret and evaluate data in the electronic medical record while searching for deficiencies in demographic and/or insurance information.
Enter patient registrations and insurance information into a patient management system.
Create new patients in the system and enter clinical and administrative data.
Describe how compliance standards correlate with medical records and documentation guidelines.
Evaluate various specialties of coding and compare and contrast the different specialties.
Create a portfolio to demonstrate professional skills to enhance marketability for employment.

Prerequisites: AHM 231 and AHM 232 and AHM 239 and AHM 240 and AHM 241.

3 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

AHN - Allied Health Nursing

AHN 106  Patient Care Assisting Techniques  

This course is designed to teach the student the skills necessary to function as a patient care assistant in hospitals and ambulatory care facilities. The role of the patient care assistant has evolved and expanded to include diagnostic testing skills that are performed under the supervision of the professional nurse or other licensed health professional. These skills include phlebotomy, recording electrocardiography, applying basic oxygen therapy, pulse oximetry, measuring blood glucose levels, and collection and processing various body fluids for testing.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the purpose of electrocardiography as it is related to the basic anatomy and physiology of the heart.
Perform the skills necessary to complete an electrocardiogram.
Describe basic hematology laboratory tests and the components and function of the blood.
Perform phlebotomy skills, including venipuncture and skin puncture correctly and successfully.
Demonstrate proper technique in obtaining blood glucose measurements and other components of blood obtained through skin puncture.
Explain the reasons for the collection of urine, stool and sputum specimens in assessing health status and diagnosing disease.
Perform procedures for collecting, measuring and testing urine, stool and sputum specimens appropriately.
Describe basic anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system and the underlying principles associated with respiration.
Demonstrate skills in administration of low-flow oxygen therapy, reservoir systems, hyperinflations therapy, and oxygen assessment.

Prerequisites: AHN 100.

4 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

AHN 200  Excellence in Care-Nursing Assistant Program  

Delaware County Community College's "Excellence in Care" Nursing Assistant Program is a 133-hour intensive course in accordance with the regulatory guidelines established by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It includes, 48 hours of didactic, 25 hours of simulation laboratory activities, and 60 hours of clinical experience at an approved long term care facility. This course prepares students for employment in acute care, acute rehab, hospice, home health care and long-term care facilities. In addition to preparing students clinically, this course emphasizes leadership skills, service excellence values, problem solving/decision making, cultural sensitivity, interpersonal and civility skills in the workplace, professionalism/employability skills, conflict resolution, and time and stress management. Students completing this course are qualified to test with the American Red Cross and placed on the Pennsylvania Nurse Aide Registry. Departmental approval is required to enroll in the course to comply with federal and state legislative requirements- OBRA and Act 14, respectively. NOTE Prerequisites: High School diploma or GED. Students must meet DCCC's clinical and physical program requirements and therefore departmental approval is required. INT 100 is strongly encouraged.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Function as an unlicensed individual in the role of a nurse aide within the legal and ethical standards set forth by the profession nursing as regulated by the State Board of Nursing for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Demonstrate use of appropriate and effective communication skills.
Apply the basic principles of infection control.
Assist with basic emergency procedures.
Demonstrate behavior that maintains client and/or client rights.
Demonstrate behaviors and skills that promote client and clients independence and prevents abuseDemonstrate knowledge and applies the principles of basic nutrition to prevent neglect and exploitationIdentify and report abnormal signs and symptoms of common diseases and conditions of the body systems.
Provide for a safe, clean environment.
Provide personal care as directed by the licensed professional/practitioner/supervisor.
Provide care to client when death is imminent.
Demonstrate skills that incorporate principles of restorative care under the direction of a licensed professional/practitioner/supervisor.
Demonstrate basic skills by identifying the psychosocial characteristics of the populations being served in the nursing facility and/or by the health care agency including persons affected by intellectual disabilities, mental illness, Alzheimer's disease and related disorders that cause cognitive impairment.
Explain how to anticipate and manage crises and identifies alternative solutions when appropriate interventions fail.
Plan problem-solving strategies using critical thinking to improve the health care delivery process.
Employ leadership and peer mentoring skills in the clinical setting.

6 Credits48 Weekly Lecture Hours
 25 Weekly Lab Hours

AHS - Surgical Technology

AHS 100  Surgical Technology I  

The basic knowledge and fundamental techniques necessary for assuming the responsibilities of a surgical technologist are highlighted. Preoperative and intraoperative patient care concepts, with both nonsterile and sterile responsibilities, are emphasized. Workplace management concepts, such as medical-legal aspects, ethics, cultural sensitivity, the hospital and operating room environment, and scope of practice are introduced. This course also includes study and skill development relating to surgical instrumentation, devices and equipment; modes of patient transport and safety precautions; variations and precautions in surgical positioning and care of surgical patients; preoperative patient preparation including surgical site antisepsis; consent for surgery; use of the Universal Protocol for surgical procedure, patient and site verification; and other important intraoperative risk management processes and procedures. Related patient care procedures such as taking vital signs, laboratory study review, wound healing, specimen management, intraoperative medication management; anesthesia, sterilization and disinfection are included.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the role, function and relationship of the surgical technologist to other members of the surgical team.
Utilize a vocabulary of medical terms related to surgical patient care.
Identify microbiological principles underlying the prevention and control of infection, sterilization and disinfection methods, and aseptic technique.
Review common safety risks for surgical patients and the strategies to manage them before and during a surgical intervention.
Discuss the preoperative nonsterile and sterile responsibilities of the surgical technologist in the preparation of a patient for a surgical procedure.
Discuss the case management responsibilities of the surgical technologist in the preparation of the operating room for a surgical procedure.
Describe the intraoperative responsibilities of the surgical technologist in performing the role of the scrubbed team member during a surgical procedure.

Prerequisites: AHM 220.

Corequisites: AHS 101 and (AHM 104 or BIO 150).

5 Credits5 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHS 101  Surgical Technology Practicum I  

This course includes clinical assignment in operating room of affiliating health agencies. Selected learning experience in the application of preoperative and intraoperative patient care concepts, with both nonsterile and sterile responsibilities, are emphasized as the student integrates theory with practice during assignment to surgical patients undergoing basic surgical interventions. NOTE Prerequisite: Clearance card from College Health Office

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate correct opening and preparation of supplies used in the operating room.
Demonstrate competency in handling basic surgical instruments and devices.
Establish a safe operating room environment for the surgical patient.
Utilize sterile technique when creating and maintaining surgical field.
Demonstrate competency in hand and surgical site antisepsis, gowning and gloving the self and members of the surgical team.
Participate in intraoperative activities such as surgical counts, suture preparation, and involvement in other basic intraoperative case management activities.
Participate in preoperative case management activities such as patient transport and positioning patients in the surgical position designated by surgeon.
Participate in the terminal cleaning, sterilization, and packaging of sterile instruments and supplies.

Prerequisites: AHM 220.

Corequisites: AHS 100 and (AHM 104 or BIO 150).

5 Credits
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

AHS 102  Surgical Technology II  

This course is a continuation of Surgical Technology I. Knowledge and techniques basic to effective performance as a scrubbed team member in the operating room will be stressed. An intense review of the surgical specialties focuses on pathophysiology, diagnostic interventions, the surgical intervention (special considerations, position/positioning aids, incisions, supplies, equipment, instrumentation, procedural steps, counts and specimen care) and complications. The responsibilities of the surgical technologist in intraoperative case management during intermediate surgical interventions are emphasized. The role of the unsterile circulating team member is reviewed as the concepts of teamwork, consideration and cooperation of the surgical team are explored.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the responsibilities of the surgical technologist in assisting the registered nurse circulator during a surgical procedure.
Identify surgical interventions, instruments, sutures and accessory items used during intermediate surgical interventions such as the following: hernia repair; breast surgery; thyroid and parathyroid surgery; surgery of the biliary tract, pancreas and spleen; gastrointestinal surgery; gynecological surgery;genitourinary surgery; thoracic surgery; vascular surgery; cardiac surgery; neurosurgery; ENT; and orthopedic surgery.

Prerequisites: AHS 100 and AHS 101 and (BIO 150 or AHM 104).

Corequisites: AHS 103 and (BIO 151 or AHM 105).

4 Credits4 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHS 103  Surgical Technology Practicum II  

Clinical assignment in operating room of affiliating agency. Knowledge and techniques basic to effective performance as a scrubbed member of general surgery and specialty surgery will be stressed. Developing and improving skills as the scrub person and in the organization of work is emphasized. Progression to solo scrub experiences is expected, enabling the student to focus on anticipating the needs of the surgical team. Students will be expected to display manual and mental dexterity in the use of surgical instruments in a step-by-step fashion for specific surgical interventions. Assignments will also be made with the anesthesia department and in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU), during which the student will correlate the actions and uses of anesthetic agents and recovery from them and as a second assistant to the registered nurse circulator, during which the student will focus on providing a safe, efficient environment for the surgical patient and respecting the patient's inherent right to privacy, dignity, and culturally competent care.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Choose and assemble the instruments, supplies and accessory items used during intermediate surgical interventions such as hernia repair; breast surgery; thyroid and parathyroid surgery; surgery of the biliary tract, liver, pancreas and spleen; gastrointestinal surgery; gynecological surgery; genitourinary surgery; thoracic surgery; vascular surgery; cardiac surgery; neurosurgery; ENT; and orthopedic surgery.
Demonstrate ability to function as a scrubbed member of the surgical team during intermediate surgical interventions such as hernia repair; breast surgery; thyroid and parathyroid surgery; surgery of biliary tract, liver pancreas and spleen; gastrointestinal surgery; gynecological surgery; genitourinary surgery; thoracic surgery; vascular surgery; cardiac surgery; neurosurgery; ENT; and orthopedic surgery.
Collaborate with the registered nurse circulator and anesthesia team in providing a safe, efficient patient care environment.

Prerequisites: AHS 100 and AHS 101 and (BIO 150 or AHM 104).

Corequisites: AHS 102 and (BIO 151 or AHM 105).

6 Credits
 12 Weekly Lab Hours

AHS 200  Surgical Technology III  

This course is a continuation of Surgical Technology II. Knowledge and techniques basic to effective performance as a scrubbed member in the operating room are stressed. The responsibilities of the surgical technologist in the care and safety of the patient during and after the surgical intervention, in the general and specialty fields of surgery, are reviewed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify operative procedures, surgical instruments, accessory items and suture materials used in advanced surgical interventions such as surgery of the eye, plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric surgery, and surgery of the burn, trauma and transplant patient.

Prerequisites: AHS 102 and AHS 103.

Corequisites: AHS 201.

1 Credit3 Weekly Lecture Hours

AHS 201  Surgical Technology Practicum III  

Clinical assignment in the operating room of an affiliating agency. Selected learning experiences in advanced surgical interventions in general and specialty surgery are included. Focus is directed on independent role assumption as a surgical technologist to facilitate transition from student to graduate.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Assemble the instruments and supplies necessary for advanced surgical interventions such as surgery of the eye; plastic and reconstructive surgery; pediatric surgery; burn surgery; trauma surgery, and transplant surgery.
Demonstrate the ability to function as a member of the sterile surgical team during advanced surgical interventions such as surgery of the eye; plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric surgery, burn surgery; trauma surgery; and transplant surgery.

Prerequisites: AHS 102 and AHS 103.

Corequisites: AHS 200.

6 Credits
 24 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT - Neurodiagnostic Technology

NDT 100  Foundations of Neurodiagnostic Technology  

This course is designed to prepare the students for working in a healthcare setting as a Neurodiagnostic Technologist. The course focuses on various aspects of Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) and other allied health professions. Major components include nervous system and other relevant medical terminology, infection control practices in health care, and patient safety assessments. Students will also be introduced to the historical perspectives of Electroneurodiagnostics, as well as the Scope of practice of a NeurodiagnosticTechnologist and profession ethics as outlined by the Neurodiagnostic Society (ASET). This course will also provide students with the fundamental concepts necessary for performing routine electroencephalograms (EEG). Students will become familiar with the published guidelines for performing routine adult EEG and will learn the basic concepts of recording normal awake and sleep patterns to be applied in NDT 101. NOTE: Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) profession and describe the role of an Electroencephalography (EEG) technologist.
Describe the accepted scope of practice, statement of professional ethics, and graduate competencies.
Describe the contributions of electronic discoveries and the effects of key individuals on EEG testing procedures.
State the various infection precaution categories and describe the methods of proper infection prevention measures.
Define the terms used for various neurological disorders and diagnostic testing procedures.
Define key terms used for EEG interpretation.
Describe patient rights.
List patient assessment methods and techniques of acquiring vital signs.
Classify allied health professions and relative legislative issues pertaining to current controversies in health care.
Identify local and national EEG and allied health organizations.
Demonstrate basic math skills including calculation of voltage, frequency, duration, and metric measurements.
Discuss the different types of NDT testing procedures performed in the NDT lab.
Identify gross anatomy of the brain including lobes and basic function.
Define EEG and explain how it relates to neural functioning.
Explain the various activation procedures and give the benefits and contraindications for each.
Calculate the voltage, frequency and duration of selected waves.
Discuss calibration, reason for performing calibration and appropriate methods of troubleshooting.
Understand the role of the Allied Health Professional in emergency preparedness; including lab protocols for emergency and disaster situations, and hazardous material handling procedures.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

Corequisites: NDT 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

NDT 101  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum I  

This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for electroencephalography (EEG) procedures. Students learn about various hospital department functions and will be oriented to lab equipment, lab policies and procedures. Students are given instruction on the importance of the utilization and role of Allied Health Professionals in emergency situations, as well as bioterrorism and hazard preparedness. Students complete 10 hours per week of EEG application lab and clinical experience during this course. Students utilize mannequin heads and fellow classmates (seated students) for electrode placement while gaining experience, increasing accuracy and speed prior to clinical practice. This course combines didatic information with clinical experience and psychomotor skills in a real clinical setting. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply necessary critical thinking skills to assess and meet patient needs.
Measure head according to the International 10-20 system.
Identify electrode locations according to the international 10-20 system of measurement.
Demonstrate basic math skills necessary to adhere to 10-20 measurement system.
Accurately apply electrodes using various accepted methods of paste and collodion.
Gather and input patient information including pertinent medical history.
Apply the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) guidelines for montage development and routine Electroencephalogram (EEG) recording.
Complete practicum and clinical requirements and provide documentation of clinical performance.
Provide documentation of EEGs performed.
Describe various departmental supplies and equipment as well as policies for patient sedation, maintaining equipment, handling hazardous items such as collodion, acetone, needles and sharps.
Understand electrical safety in the patient care setting.
Recognize basic normal patterns in the awake, drowsy and asleep adult EEG and provide.
documentation of technical interpretation in clinical practice.

Corequisites: NDT 100.

7 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 102  Neuroanatomy and Physiology of the Nervous System  

This course is designed to orient students to the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. The focus of the course will be on the structure and function of the nervous system in relation to the performance of neurodiagnostic technology testing. Students will become familiar with the proper use of neuroanatomical terminology and the level of Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology necessary to perform NDT testing. In addition, functional impairment resulting from disease or injury of sensory, motor, and cognitive structures of the brain will be introduced. NOTE: Students must achieve a 'C' or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course. BIO 150 grade 'C' or better

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand and properly use neuroanatomical terminology.
Describe embryological development of the nervous system.
List the structures and functions of various neural cells in relationship to impulse propagation.
Describe EEG generation.
Identify the four lobes of the brain and the neuroanatomical landmarks that define their boundaries.
Discuss the localization and clinical significance of eloquent cortex in each of the four lobes of the human brain.
Sketch and label the major arteries supplying blood to the brain and spinal cord.
Describe the organization of gray matter and white matter.
Identify the ventricles of the brain and discuss the function of cerebrospinal fluid.
Describe the organization of the major ascending and descending tracts of the brain and spinal cord, including neural systems for pain and temperature sensation, touch and pressure sensation, motor control, and vision.
Describe the location and function of the major neuroanatomical structures involved in motor and sensory processing.
Identify the 31 pairs of spinal nerves and understand a reflex arc pathway.
Discuss the relationship between the blood brain barrier and pharmacology.
Identify the cranial nerves by name and number and list the major functions associated with each.
Discuss the functional impairments resulting from injury or disease associated with major sensory and motor structures in the forebrain, hindbrain and spinal cord.
Discuss the functional impairments resulting from injury or disease associated with major cognitive systems in the forebrain and hindbrain.

Prerequisites: NDT 100 and NDT 101 and BIO 150.

Concurrent: NDT 103

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

NDT 103  Neurodiagnostic Technology Principles and Practicum II  

Neurodiagnostic Technology Principles and Practicum II expands on the basic concepts learned in electroencephalogram (EEG) technology and Practicum I and will introduce the advanced concepts of EEG technology. This course also covers the basic concepts of instrumentation including hardware, polarity, localization and filters. Students will learn The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) Guidelines for more complex EEG recordings, such as cerebral brain death studies and pediatric recording requirements. Students will also be trained to recognize more complex EEG patterns such as the maturing EEG of a neonate, abnormal patterns associated with multiple neurologic conditions and patterns of unknown significance. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify normal, abnormal and benign electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns.
Differentiate between physiologic electrographic EEG and artifact.
Explain the affects of filters on specific waveforms.
Describe EEG activity using appropriate terminology.
Identify specific artifacts and method of elimination.
Apply polarity rules in order to identify EEG patterns.
List the advantages and disadvantages of each type of electrode and method of application.
Complete clinical requirements and document (12 hours/week).
Provide documentation of EEGs performed.
Provide documentation of pattern recognition and technical interpretation.
Explain the technical and ethical concepts of brain death, Electrocerebral Inactivity (ECI), recordings.
Discuss in detail The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) Guidelines for recording pediatric EEG studies and how they relate to the everyday clinical setting.
List common antiepileptic medications, their uses, side effects, and effects on the EEG tracing.
Explain sedation practices and the advantages and disadvantages associated with conscious sedation.

Prerequisites: NDT 100 and NDT 101.

Concurrent: NDT 102

8 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 104  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum III  

This course is designed to prepare students for the duties involved in performing Evoked Potential (EP) testing procedures and will introduce students to the basic clinical and technical concepts of visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. This course also provides instruction for basic computer components and their performance, digital recordings, vertical and horizontal resolution, Nyquist theory, aliasing, sampling rate, sampling skew, display gain, epoch/paperspeed, montage reformatting, networking, data transfer, archiving and video linking and recording references. NOTE: Students will attend both lecture and lab. Students must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand basic computer components and their performance as they relate to neurodiagnostic testing procedures.
This includes digital recordings, vertical and horizontal resolution, aliasing, sampling skew and waveform display settings.
Describe the basic computer components of a digital Evoked Potential (EP) machine.
Define digital related terms such as: analog to digital conversion, horizontal and vertical resolution and aliasing.
Define evoked potentials and explain how they are used to evaluate neural functioning.
Describe the accepted use of parameter settings and appropriate instrumentation for auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.
State the electrode measurement and application techniques for auditory visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.
Describe the anatomy of the auditory, visual, and sensory pathways.
Identify the waveform responses and generator sites.
State the criteria for clinically significant abnormality.
Define key terms used for evoked potential interpretation.

Prerequisites: NDT 102 and NDT 103.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 105  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum IV  

This course is designed to prepare students for the duties involved in performing Polysomnography (PSG) testing procedures. This course will introduce students to the basic clinical and technical concepts of all night sleep studies, multiple sleep latency tests and maintenance of wakefulness tests. This course also provides basic introductory instruction on normal sleep architecture and the procedures involved in the PSG electrode application/hook-up and recording. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the montages used in polysomnography (PSG) .
Demonstrate how to perform a technically adequate Polysomnography , multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT) by measuring and applying electrodes according to protocol.
Perform a patient calibration.
Perform an instrument calibration.
Demonstrate how to obtain a baseline recording.
Describe common sleep disorders and treatment options.

Prerequisites: NDT 104.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 200  Neurological Disorders  

This course provides detailed information about the neurological examination and specific neurological diseases processes relevant to the field of Neurodiagnostics. Students will gain knowledge of specific neurological disease processes such as: epilepsy and seizures, epileptic syndromes, cerebrovascular diseases, dementia, syncope, coma, congenital and developmental disorders, CNS infections, psychiatric and psychological disorders, movement disorders and headache. Several sessions will focus on related anatomy and pathology to correlate clinical findings and Neurodiagnostic test results. NOTE: Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the key components of the neurological exam and how these findings are relevant to electroencephalogram (EEG) findings.
Define the various levels of consciousness and clinical signs associated with impaired consciousness and coma.
Understand the anatomic structures required to maintain consciousness.
Explain the basic terms used to describe seizures and the difference between seizures and epilepsy.
Describe specific types of seizures, their clinical signs, EEG, treatment options and classification.
Differentiate between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke; identify possible clinical symptoms by location of event, and identify the major blood vessels supplying the brain and the regions of the brain they affect.
Identify symptoms associated with the various dementia and delirium and the EEG findings associated with dementia and delirium.
List the symptoms associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) infections.
Understand psychiatric and psychological disorders in the field of Neurodiagnostic Technology.
Understand the basics of brain imaging techniques and how they relate to neurodiagnostic findings.
Describe the most common movement disorders and their treatment.
Define the different types of headaches and their treatment.
Understand the terms used to refer to different types of nerve injury and distinguish the difference between axonal and demyelinating neuropathies.
Determine the different effects that an axonal and a demyelinating neuropathy will have on nerve conduction studies.
Describe the different types of muscle disease and how the Electromyography (EMG) can be used to diagnose them.
Recognize the different types of autonomic disorders and the tests used to diagnose them.
Identify the different symptoms associated with imbalance and the diagnostic approach to dizziness.
Discuss the possible causes, diagnosis, and treatment of multiple sclerosis.
Explain the basic principles behind using ultrasound to image vessels and the basic principles behind transcranial Doppler.
Understand the neuroanatomy of pain and the treatments for pain.
Describe the most frequent syndromes associated with spinal cord injury.

Prerequisites: NDT 105.

Corequisites: NDT 201.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

NDT 201  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum V  

This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for Electroencephalography (EEG) procedures, as well as apply skills learned in NDT 104 (Evoked Potentials) and NDT 105 (Polysomnography PSG) to the clinical environment. Students will learn about seizure classification and epileptic syndromes. This course will also focus on EEG interpretation as associated with seizure disorders, epileptiform abnormalities, and artifact recognition. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply necessary critical thinking skills to assess and meet the patient’s needs.
Measure head according to the International 10-20 System.
Accurately apply electrodes using various accepted methods of paste and collodion.
Complete clinical requirements and document.
Provide documentation of Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) studies performed.
Provide documentation of pattern recognition and technical interpretation.
Understand the importance of artifact recognition, elimination, and monitoring techniques.
Discuss seizure classification and provide examples of seizure disorders related to each category.
Discuss in detail a patient’s history, course, treatment, and outcome as it relates to a specific epileptic syndrome and present these findings in a case history/research project.

Prerequisites: NDT 105.

Corequisites: NDT 200.

8 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 202  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum VI  

This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for electroencephalogram (EEG) procedures and advanced monitoring. During this semester the students will apply critical thinking skills in order to distinguish the monitoring techniques in the operating room and long term monitoring environment. During clinical rotations the students will generate a hypothesis based on the evidence of the data of the history and technologist’s assessment of the patient. This course introduces the students to advanced monitoring techniques performed in the Epilepsy monitoring unit, Neonatal and Adult Intensive Care Units, as well as multiple procedures performed in the operating room. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply necessary critical thinking skills to assess and meet the patient’s needs.
Measure head according to the International 10-20 System.
Accurately apply electrodes using various accepted methods of paste and collodion.
Complete clinical requirements and document.
Provide documentation of Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) studies performed.
Provide documentation of pattern recognition and technical interpretation.
Understand the importance of artifact recognition, elimination, and monitoring techniques.
Discuss seizure classification and provide examples of seizure disorders related to each category.
Discuss in detail a patient’s history, course, treatment, and outcome as it relates to a specific epileptic syndrome and present these findings in a case history/research project.

Prerequisites: NDT 201.

8 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 12 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH - Respiratory Therapy

RTH 102  Respiratory Therapy Principles II  

This course provides students with the information necessary to safely administer aerosolized respiratory drugs. The student will learn the method of action of the drugs used to treat respiratory diseases and proper dosages and frequency of administration. The student will understand the indications for mechanical ventilation as well as the monitoring of critically ill adult patients requiring ventilatory support. Complications involved in positive pressure ventilation will be reviewed. This course also covers the methods involved in removal of patients from mechanical ventilators. NOTE: Prerequisites require a grade of "C" or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
The student will have a basic knowledge of how drugs are administered.
The student will be able to explain the mechanism of action for respiratory drugs.
The student will be able to identify the basic functions of mechanical ventilators.
The student will be able to describe why patients may require ventilatory support.
Discuss the importance of monitoring patients requiring ventilatory support.
Describe when and how to successfully wean a patient from mechanical ventilation.

Prerequisites: RTH 100 and RTH 101 and BIO 150.

Corequisites: BIO 151.

Concurrent: RTH 103

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

RTH 103  Respiratory Therapy Practicum II  

This course provides students with the knowledge and motor skills necessary to deliver oxygen therapy bronchopulmonary hygiene airway management and ventilator management to the adult patient. NOTE: Prerequisites require a grade of "C" or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recommend respiratory care based on evaluation of a patient's medical history, physical examination and diagnostic studies.
Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation according to the protocols of the American Heart Association.
Ensure the safety of patients and staff by adhering to infection control standards.
Deliver bronchopulmonary hygiene therapies and modify according to the patient's response.
Perform arterial and puncture.
Maintain a patent airway.
Manage ventilation of adult patients in the simulation laboratory.

Prerequisites: RTH 100 and RTH 101 and BIO 150.

Corequisites: BIO 151.

Concurrent: RTH 102

6 Credits
 12 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH 104  Respiratory Therapy Summer Clinical I  

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the opportunity to utilize the clinical skills learned and practiced during the simulation lab in the clinical area of the hospital or other clinical institution. Students will be expected to perform the duties of a Respiratory Therapist under the direction of a licensed and credentialed Respiratory Therapist. This course is only open to students in the Respiratory Therapy Program. Because all courses in the Respiratory Therapy Program must be taken in a specific sequence, this course is designed only for the Summer semester. This allows the student the opportunity to gain extensive clinical experience, in an 8-hour day that would not be available during the Fall or Spring semesters. The RTH courses taken in the prior Fall and Spring semesters provide the necessary didactic and laboratory foundational experience necessary for the student to be successful in this clinical course. The student will also gain a realistic understanding of the professional requirements of a Respiratory Therapist while providing the continuity of caring for critically ill patients. NOTE College Academic Learning Goal Designation Information Technology (TC) when taken with RTH 105

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and modify therapy based on patient response.
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and ventilatory support to critically ill adult patients.
Assist physicians with special procedures and effectively communicate with the diverse members of the healthcare team during pulmonary rounds.
Properly clean and disinfect, maintain, and troubleshoot respiratory care equipment.
Demonstrate proficiency utilizing various Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: RTH 102 and RTH 103.

5 Credits

RTH 105  Respiratory Therapy Summer Clinical II  

This course is a continuation of RTH 104: Summer Clinical I. It is a supervised clinical practice. The student is provided the opportunity to utilize the clinical skills learned and practiced during the simulation lab, as well as skills learned during Summer Clinical I. Students will be expected to perform the duties of a Respiratory Therapist under the direction of a licensed and credentialed Respiratory Therapist.This course is only open to students in the Respiratory Therapy Program. Because all courses in the Respiratory Therapy Program must be taken in a specific sequence, this course is designed only for the Summer semester. This allows the student the opportunity to gain extensive clinical experience, in an 8-hour day that would not be available during the Fall or Spring semesters. The RTH courses taken in the prior Fall and Spring semesters provide the necessary didactic and laboratory foundational experience necessary for the student to be successful in this clinical course. The student will also gain a realistic understanding of the professional requirements of a Respiratory Therapist while providing the continuity of caring for critically ill patients. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation Information Technology (TC) when taken with RTH 104

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and modify therapy based on patient response.
Appreciate the role of anesthesia and surgery in the practice of respiratory care.
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and ventilatory support to critically ill adult patients.
Analyze and ensure accurate resulting of arterial blood gas sample results and various other types of lab samples utilizing a Blood Gas Machine and Laboratory Information System to determine cardiopulmonary function.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: RTH 102 and RTH 103 and RTH 104.

5 Credits

RTH 110  Respiratory Therapy Principles and Practicum I  

This course is designed for students majoring in Respiratory Therapy. The course begins with the study of the sciences and how they relate to the respiratory system and to respiratory care. An in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiopulmonary system is also included. Students will be expected to learn Medical Terminology in a self-study format. Students will learn the indications and complications with administering medical gases to patients. Acid base balance within the body will be presented. The history of the field of Respiratory Care will be discussed. Students are guided and directed by an instructor in the laboratory. This reinforces the principles taught utilizing the laboratory approach. Assignments applying the principles of physics and chemistry essential to respiratory care will be performed in the stimulation lab. Models and computer simulation will be utilized when appropriate. NOTE: Prerequisites: ENG 100 and CHE 110 with grades "C" or better. Completion of any Algebra based math course: MAT 100 or above, (not including MAT 120 or MAT 131, MAT 125, MAT 126, MAT 210) with a grade of “C” or better. DCCC Placement test scores for Math Placement into MAT 135 or above. Successful completion of the College Algebra CLEP exam (College Level Examination Program) Transfer of credit from another accredited institution of a “C” or better in a math course equivalent to MAT 100 or above, (not including MAT 120 or MAT 121, MAT 125, MAT 126, MAT 210). This course must have been completed within 5 years of starting RTH 110.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss and apply the principles of the physical sciences as they relate to Respiratory Care.
Discuss the principles of cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology and apply in the clinical situation.
Describe acid-base physiology and compensatory mechanisms and apply the knowledge in clinical situations.
Discuss the concepts of team approach and patient-therapist interactions and apply the concepts in clinical situations.
Recall the history and purpose of the field of Respiratory Therapy.
Discuss the legal and ethical concepts as they relate to the field of Respiratory Care.
Discuss how oxygen is manufactured and stored.
Discuss the indications and complications involved in oxygen administration.
Administer medical gas therapy utilizing the appropriate equipment for the patients medical condition.
Ensure the accurate delivery of medical gas concentrations.
Troubleshoot medical gas delivery devices.
Communicate using medical terminology.

Prerequisites: CHE 110 and ENG 100 and (MAT 100 or MAT 128 or MAT 135 or MAT 136 or MAT 151 or MAT 152 or MAT 160 or MAT 161 or MAT 200 or MAT 230 or MAT 260 or MAT 261). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

Corequisites: BIO 150.

8 Credits60 Weekly Lecture Hours
 120 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH 200  Respiratory Therapy Principles III  

In this course students will study advanced topics in respiratory care including cardiovascular and renal physiology and the specialties of pulmonary function testing and pediatrics.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze tests of pulmonary function and modify therapies based upon results.
Apply the principles of respiratory care, cognizant of the special physiologic and pathophysiologic processes of the neonatal and pediatric patient.
Describe fundamental principles of normal renal physiology.
Describe fundamental principles of normal cardiovascular physiology.

Prerequisites: RTH 105.

Corequisites: RTH 201 and RTH 204.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

RTH 201  Respiratory Therapy Clinical Practicum III  

This course is a supervised clinical practice.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene, invasive and non-invasive ventilation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the Emergency Room setting.
Perform pulmonary function testing and analyze results to ensure appropriateness of respiratory care.
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and ventilatory support to critically ill adult patients.
Assist physicians with patient assessment, special procedure and communicate effectively with physicians.

Prerequisites: RTH 105.

Corequisites: RTH 200 and RTH 204.

6 Credits
 12 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH 202  Respiratory Therapy Principles IV  

This course includes the study of advanced cardiovascular and renal physiology and pathophysiology, and treatment regimens that impact respiratory care.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the basic principles of pharmacology, drug administration methods, drug action and side effects with emphasis on respiratory and cardiovascular systems.
Discuss the principles of fluid and electrolyte balance and how it relates to the respiratory system.
Describe the principles of cardiac and hemodynamic monitoring.
Research and present a paper on an area or concept of respiratory therapy in the area of techniques equipment, or respiratory physiology.

Prerequisites: RTH 201.

Corequisites: RTH 203 and RTH 205.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

RTH 203  Respiratory Therapy Practicum IV  

This course is a supervised clinical practice.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and ventilator support to neonatal and pediatric patients.
Perform respiratory care in the subacute setting.
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and ventilatory support to critically ill adult patients.
Perform and recommend cardiovascular diagnostic testing as appropriate to respiratory care.

Prerequisites: RTH 201 and RTH 204.

Corequisites: RTH 202 and RTH 205.

6 Credits
 12 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH 204  Pulmonary Pathophysiology Clinical Rounds I  

This course is a supervised clinical study of pulmonary pathophysiology.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the etiology, pathology, functional abnormality, PFT results, pulmonary assessment data, clinical features, treatment and prognosis of the major diseases effecting the respiratory system.

Prerequisites: RTH 105.

Corequisites: RTH 200 and RTH 201.

2 Credits
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH 205  Pulmonary Pathophysiology Clinical Rounds II  

This course is a supervised clinical study of pulmonary pathophysiology.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the etiology, pathology, functional abnormality, PFT results, pulmonary assessment data, clinical features, treatment and prognosis of the major diseases effecting the respiratory system.

Prerequisites: RTH 201 and RTH 204.

Corequisites: RTH 202 and RTH 203.

2 Credits
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

RTH 206  Respiratory Therapy Summer Clinical III  

This course is a supervised clinical practice.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Administer and evaluate the results of polysomnographic testing.
Perform and recommend invasive cardiovascular diagnostic testing as appropriate to respiratory care.
Administer bronchopulmonary hygiene and ventilatory support to critically ill adult patients.

Prerequisites: RTH 203 and RTH 205.

4 Credits