Academic Catalog

Human Services (HUS)

HUS 101  Introduction to Social Work and Human Services  

This is a one semester introduction to human services and the major policies and practices that are used to understand human strengths and challenges. The course explores the skills, values and knowledge based needed to effectively work as a culturally competent, social work or human service professional in a multidisciplinary setting.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the historical foundation and current role of the Human Service Worker.
Describe the structure and content of a professional helping relationship.
Identify interventions based on the major case management and counseling models in the field of human services.
Demonstrate the skills necessary for interviewing individuals in a social service or agency setting.
Understand the limitations of implementing services in social service systems.
Explain the impact of the shift of responsibility for social welfare programs from the federal, to the state, to the local government, in the United States.
Demonstrate how knowledge of oppression, privileges, culture, racism, institutional racism, stereotypes, discrimination, and ethnic identity relate to the skills necessary to perform the tasks of a culturally competent human service worker.
Plan and design an intervention program targeted to a specific population's need for group services.
Evaluate the ethical dilemmas surrounding the concepts of self-determination, mandated treatment, HIV/Aids, child abuse, the right to die and class differences between the worker and the client.
Identify the emotional and physical symptoms and causes of professional burnout along with the methods designed to prevent it.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUS 201  Domestic Violence  

This course is a one semester overview of the complexities underlying domestic violence in America, with a particular focus on Pennsylvania. Experts define domestic violence as behavioral patterns that are purposeful, often violent and used to maintain power and control over an intimate partner. Students will examine the historic and cultural context and expanded definition of domestic violence along with the current best practices to prevent and eliminate this problem. This course is designed to enhance the knowledge of students interested in the field of social work as they critically evaluate the complex overlapping of family dynamics, work place concerns and other social problems with the impact of physical, sexual, emotional, economic and psychological abuse. Special attention will be paid to the current best practices designed to assist children, individuals, families and communities with the goals of safety and self-determination.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define domestic violence, the cycle of violence and related concepts.
Identify and explain the roles of the perpetrator, victim and bystander.
Describe the support/benefits and limitations of the current legal and police responses to domestic violence incidents.
Identify governmental and social service agencies available to assist victims, perpetrators and bystanders.
Describe the structure, content and limitations of a professional helping relationship.
Identify local agencies and models of strength-based interventions and treatment practices.
Demonstrate how knowledge of oppression, privilege, culture, racism, institutional racism, stereotypes, discrimination, and ethnic identity relate to the skills necessary to perform the tasks of a culturally competent human service worker.
Evaluate the ethical dilemmas surrounding the concept of self-determination and mandated-treatment as these relate to people who experience domestic violence.
Identify the emotional and physical symptoms and causes of professional burnout along with the methods designed to prevent it.

Prerequisites: ENG 100 and PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours