Academic Catalog

Neurodiagnostic Tech (NDT)

NDT 100  Foundations of Neurodiagnostic Technology  

This course is designed to prepare the students for working in a healthcare setting as a Neurodiagnostic Technologist. The course focuses on various aspects of Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) and other allied health professions. Major components include nervous system and other relevant medical terminology, infection control practices in health care, and patient safety assessments. Students will also be introduced to the historical perspectives of Electroneurodiagnostics, as well as the Scope of practice of a NeurodiagnosticTechnologist and profession ethics as outlined by the Neurodiagnostic Society (ASET). This course will also provide students with the fundamental concepts necessary for performing routine electroencephalograms (EEG). Students will become familiar with the published guidelines for performing routine adult EEG and will learn the basic concepts of recording normal awake and sleep patterns to be applied in NDT 101. NOTE: Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) profession and describe the role of an Electroencephalography (EEG) technologist.
Describe the accepted scope of practice, statement of professional ethics, and graduate competencies.
Describe the contributions of electronic discoveries and the effects of key individuals on EEG testing procedures.
State the various infection precaution categories and describe the methods of proper infection prevention measures.
Define the terms used for various neurological disorders and diagnostic testing procedures.
Define key terms used for EEG interpretation.
Describe patient rights.
List patient assessment methods and techniques of acquiring vital signs.
Classify allied health professions and relative legislative issues pertaining to current controversies in health care.
Identify local and national EEG and allied health organizations.
Demonstrate basic math skills including calculation of voltage, frequency, duration, and metric measurements.
Discuss the different types of NDT testing procedures performed in the NDT lab.
Identify gross anatomy of the brain including lobes and basic function.
Define EEG and explain how it relates to neural functioning.
Explain the various activation procedures and give the benefits and contraindications for each.
Calculate the voltage, frequency and duration of selected waves.
Discuss calibration, reason for performing calibration and appropriate methods of troubleshooting.
Understand the role of the Allied Health Professional in emergency preparedness; including lab protocols for emergency and disaster situations, and hazardous material handling procedures.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

Corequisites: NDT 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

NDT 101  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum I  

This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for electroencephalography (EEG) procedures. Students learn about various hospital department functions and will be oriented to lab equipment, lab policies and procedures. Students are given instruction on the importance of the utilization and role of Allied Health Professionals in emergency situations, as well as bioterrorism and hazard preparedness. Students complete 10 hours per week of EEG application lab and clinical experience during this course. Students utilize mannequin heads and fellow classmates (seated students) for electrode placement while gaining experience, increasing accuracy and speed prior to clinical practice. This course combines didatic information with clinical experience and psychomotor skills in a real clinical setting. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply necessary critical thinking skills to assess and meet patient needs.
Measure head according to the International 10-20 system.
Identify electrode locations according to the international 10-20 system of measurement.
Demonstrate basic math skills necessary to adhere to 10-20 measurement system.
Accurately apply electrodes using various accepted methods of paste and collodion.
Gather and input patient information including pertinent medical history.
Apply the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) guidelines for montage development and routine Electroencephalogram (EEG) recording.
Complete practicum and clinical requirements and provide documentation of clinical performance.
Provide documentation of EEGs performed.
Describe various departmental supplies and equipment as well as policies for patient sedation, maintaining equipment, handling hazardous items such as collodion, acetone, needles and sharps.
Understand electrical safety in the patient care setting.
Recognize basic normal patterns in the awake, drowsy and asleep adult EEG and provide.
documentation of technical interpretation in clinical practice.

Corequisites: NDT 100.

7 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 102  Neuroanatomy and Physiology of the Nervous System  

This course is designed to orient students to the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. The focus of the course will be on the structure and function of the nervous system in relation to the performance of neurodiagnostic technology testing. Students will become familiar with the proper use of neuroanatomical terminology and the level of Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology necessary to perform NDT testing. In addition, functional impairment resulting from disease or injury of sensory, motor, and cognitive structures of the brain will be introduced. NOTE: Students must achieve a 'C' or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course. BIO 150 grade 'C' or better

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand and properly use neuroanatomical terminology.
Describe embryological development of the nervous system.
List the structures and functions of various neural cells in relationship to impulse propagation.
Describe EEG generation.
Identify the four lobes of the brain and the neuroanatomical landmarks that define their boundaries.
Discuss the localization and clinical significance of eloquent cortex in each of the four lobes of the human brain.
Sketch and label the major arteries supplying blood to the brain and spinal cord.
Describe the organization of gray matter and white matter.
Identify the ventricles of the brain and discuss the function of cerebrospinal fluid.
Describe the organization of the major ascending and descending tracts of the brain and spinal cord, including neural systems for pain and temperature sensation, touch and pressure sensation, motor control, and vision.
Describe the location and function of the major neuroanatomical structures involved in motor and sensory processing.
Identify the 31 pairs of spinal nerves and understand a reflex arc pathway.
Discuss the relationship between the blood brain barrier and pharmacology.
Identify the cranial nerves by name and number and list the major functions associated with each.
Discuss the functional impairments resulting from injury or disease associated with major sensory and motor structures in the forebrain, hindbrain and spinal cord.
Discuss the functional impairments resulting from injury or disease associated with major cognitive systems in the forebrain and hindbrain.

Prerequisites: NDT 100 and NDT 101 and BIO 150.

Corequisites: NDT 103.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

NDT 103  Neurodiagnostic Technology Principles and Practicum II  

Neurodiagnostic Technology Principles and Practicum II expands on the basic concepts learned in electroencephalogram (EEG) technology and Practicum I and will introduce the advanced concepts of EEG technology. This course also covers the basic concepts of instrumentation including hardware, polarity, localization and filters. Students will learn The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) Guidelines for more complex EEG recordings, such as cerebral brain death studies and pediatric recording requirements. Students will also be trained to recognize more complex EEG patterns such as the maturing EEG of a neonate, abnormal patterns associated with multiple neurologic conditions and patterns of unknown significance. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify normal, abnormal and benign electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns.
Differentiate between physiologic electrographic EEG and artifact.
Explain the affects of filters on specific waveforms.
Describe EEG activity using appropriate terminology.
Identify specific artifacts and method of elimination.
Apply polarity rules in order to identify EEG patterns.
List the advantages and disadvantages of each type of electrode and method of application.
Complete clinical requirements and document (12 hours/week).
Provide documentation of EEGs performed.
Provide documentation of pattern recognition and technical interpretation.
Explain the technical and ethical concepts of brain death, Electrocerebral Inactivity (ECI), recordings.
Discuss in detail The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) Guidelines for recording pediatric EEG studies and how they relate to the everyday clinical setting.
List common antiepileptic medications, their uses, side effects, and effects on the EEG tracing.
Explain sedation practices and the advantages and disadvantages associated with conscious sedation.

Prerequisites: NDT 100 and NDT 101.

Corequisites: NDT 102.

8 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 104  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum III  

This course is designed to prepare students for the duties involved in performing Evoked Potential (EP) testing procedures and will introduce students to the basic clinical and technical concepts of visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. This course also provides instruction for basic computer components and their performance, digital recordings, vertical and horizontal resolution, Nyquist theory, aliasing, sampling rate, sampling skew, display gain, epoch/paperspeed, montage reformatting, networking, data transfer, archiving and video linking and recording references. NOTE: Students will attend both lecture and lab. Students must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand basic computer components and their performance as they relate to neurodiagnostic testing procedures.
This includes digital recordings, vertical and horizontal resolution, aliasing, sampling skew and waveform display settings.
Describe the basic computer components of a digital Evoked Potential (EP) machine.
Define digital related terms such as: analog to digital conversion, horizontal and vertical resolution and aliasing.
Define evoked potentials and explain how they are used to evaluate neural functioning.
Describe the accepted use of parameter settings and appropriate instrumentation for auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.
State the electrode measurement and application techniques for auditory visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.
Describe the anatomy of the auditory, visual, and sensory pathways.
Identify the waveform responses and generator sites.
State the criteria for clinically significant abnormality.
Define key terms used for evoked potential interpretation.

Prerequisites: NDT 102 and NDT 103.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 105  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum IV  

This course is designed to prepare students for the duties involved in performing Polysomnography (PSG) testing procedures. This course will introduce students to the basic clinical and technical concepts of all night sleep studies, multiple sleep latency tests and maintenance of wakefulness tests. This course also provides basic introductory instruction on normal sleep architecture and the procedures involved in the PSG electrode application/hook-up and recording. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the montages used in polysomnography (PSG) .
Demonstrate how to perform a technically adequate Polysomnography , multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT) by measuring and applying electrodes according to protocol.
Perform a patient calibration.
Perform an instrument calibration.
Demonstrate how to obtain a baseline recording.
Describe common sleep disorders and treatment options.

Prerequisites: NDT 104.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 200  Neurological Disorders  

This course provides detailed information about the neurological examination and specific neurological diseases processes relevant to the field of Neurodiagnostics. Students will gain knowledge of specific neurological disease processes such as: epilepsy and seizures, epileptic syndromes, cerebrovascular diseases, dementia, syncope, coma, congenital and developmental disorders, CNS infections, psychiatric and psychological disorders, movement disorders and headache. Several sessions will focus on related anatomy and pathology to correlate clinical findings and Neurodiagnostic test results. NOTE: Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the key components of the neurological exam and how these findings are relevant to electroencephalogram (EEG) findings.
Define the various levels of consciousness and clinical signs associated with impaired consciousness and coma.
Understand the anatomic structures required to maintain consciousness.
Explain the basic terms used to describe seizures and the difference between seizures and epilepsy.
Describe specific types of seizures, their clinical signs, EEG, treatment options and classification.
Differentiate between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke; identify possible clinical symptoms by location of event, and identify the major blood vessels supplying the brain and the regions of the brain they affect.
Identify symptoms associated with the various dementia and delirium and the EEG findings associated with dementia and delirium.
List the symptoms associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) infections.
Understand psychiatric and psychological disorders in the field of Neurodiagnostic Technology.
Understand the basics of brain imaging techniques and how they relate to neurodiagnostic findings.
Describe the most common movement disorders and their treatment.
Define the different types of headaches and their treatment.
Understand the terms used to refer to different types of nerve injury and distinguish the difference between axonal and demyelinating neuropathies.
Determine the different effects that an axonal and a demyelinating neuropathy will have on nerve conduction studies.
Describe the different types of muscle disease and how the Electromyography (EMG) can be used to diagnose them.
Recognize the different types of autonomic disorders and the tests used to diagnose them.
Identify the different symptoms associated with imbalance and the diagnostic approach to dizziness.
Discuss the possible causes, diagnosis, and treatment of multiple sclerosis.
Explain the basic principles behind using ultrasound to image vessels and the basic principles behind transcranial Doppler.
Understand the neuroanatomy of pain and the treatments for pain.
Describe the most frequent syndromes associated with spinal cord injury.

Prerequisites: NDT 105.

Corequisites: NDT 201.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

NDT 201  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum V  

This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for Electroencephalography (EEG) procedures, as well as apply skills learned in NDT 104 (Evoked Potentials) and NDT 105 (Polysomnography PSG) to the clinical environment. Students will learn about seizure classification and epileptic syndromes. This course will also focus on EEG interpretation as associated with seizure disorders, epileptiform abnormalities, and artifact recognition. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply necessary critical thinking skills to assess and meet the patient’s needs.
Measure head according to the International 10-20 System.
Accurately apply electrodes using various accepted methods of paste and collodion.
Complete clinical requirements and document.
Provide documentation of Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) studies performed.
Provide documentation of pattern recognition and technical interpretation.
Understand the importance of artifact recognition, elimination, and monitoring techniques.
Discuss seizure classification and provide examples of seizure disorders related to each category.
Discuss in detail a patient’s history, course, treatment, and outcome as it relates to a specific epileptic syndrome and present these findings in a case history/research project.

Prerequisites: NDT 105.

Corequisites: NDT 200.

8 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 10 Weekly Lab Hours

NDT 202  Neurodiagnostic Technology Practicum VI  

This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for electroencephalogram (EEG) procedures and advanced monitoring. During this semester the students will apply critical thinking skills in order to distinguish the monitoring techniques in the operating room and long term monitoring environment. During clinical rotations the students will generate a hypothesis based on the evidence of the data of the history and technologist’s assessment of the patient. This course introduces the students to advanced monitoring techniques performed in the Epilepsy monitoring unit, Neonatal and Adult Intensive Care Units, as well as multiple procedures performed in the operating room. NOTE: Student must pass each Clinical Competency Exam with at least a 70%. Students must achieve a "C" or better in each NDT course within the Neurodiagnostic Technology Program in order to progress sequentially to the next course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply necessary critical thinking skills to assess and meet the patient’s needs.
Measure head according to the International 10-20 System.
Accurately apply electrodes using various accepted methods of paste and collodion.
Complete clinical requirements and document.
Provide documentation of Neurodiagnostic Technology (NDT) studies performed.
Provide documentation of pattern recognition and technical interpretation.
Understand the importance of artifact recognition, elimination, and monitoring techniques.
Discuss seizure classification and provide examples of seizure disorders related to each category.
Discuss in detail a patient’s history, course, treatment, and outcome as it relates to a specific epileptic syndrome and present these findings in a case history/research project.

Prerequisites: NDT 201.

8 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 12 Weekly Lab Hours