Academic Catalog

Art (ART)

ART 100  Art and Child Development  

This course examines artistic development and expression in childhood. Emphasis will be on actual artistic production, the visual language of art including the principles of design and color and on issues of aesthetics and response strategies in relation to art criticism and art history. The cognitive developmental stages of artistic growth in childhood and psychomotor skills will serve as a foundation in preparation for curriculum planning.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop and apply techniques to motivate children of elementary school age to explore, discover, manipulate and create artworks in various art media reflective of their particular developmental stage.
Distinguish basic principles of artistic design and color theory and to integrate these ideas into general curriculum planning and artistic production.
Identify and describe a child's art production in stages of creative, emotional and mental growth.
Analyze student/children's artwork according to aesthetic issues.
Utilize a broad view of art historical content and how it relates to student/children's artwork.
Produce a wide range of projects applicable to curriculum planning within the elementary school but based on the cognitive and motor skills indicative of a university-level student.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 101  Mural Painting  

This course examines contemporary mural painting through both theory and practice. Students will study the history and roots of contemporary mural painting within the context of public art. Students will execute a design for a mural each semester, providing the College with new artwork. This will be a collaborative effort. Students will also create a personal mural design project and choose and study a particular muralist. The visual language of art, including the principles and elements of design, color theory and aesthetics will be emphasized throughout the course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish basic principles of artistic design including unity/variety, balance, radial and crystallographic, emphasis, rhythm, repetition, proportion-scale and figure ground relationship.
Manipulate the general elements of visual language including line, shape, volume, texture and space.
Manipulate properties of hue, value and chroma.
Identify and describe various aesthetic patterns due to historical events, geographical issues and sociopolitical patterns within the context of mural painting in both the modern and contemporary arena.
Produce a small to medium size mural design and a collaborative group mural utilizing various techniques for enlarging designs and drawings.
Prepare the materials for the process of painting and or mural application.
Integrate critical thinking skills through completed artworks and participation in the formal critique process.

3 Credits
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 110  Art from the Ancient Worlds through the Middle Ages  

This course analyzes and evaluates the artistic styles from prehistoric cave art to the fourteenth century in Europe. Painting, sculpture and architecture are studied as both individual works and as active participants in broader political, economic, socio-cultural, historical, and environmental systems. Issues concerning iconography, social and geographic context, and biography will also be a focus of this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify representative art of a range of geographic and chronological periods, including Prehistoric Europe, Egypt, The Ancient Near East, The Aegean, Greece, Rome, Medieval Europe through the fourteenth century in Europe.
Identify stylistic changes affected by political, economic, socio-cultural, historical, and environmental systems.
Define the technical terms associated with the description of art.
Explain the techniques used in painting, sculpture and architecture of the periods.
Visually analyze and recognize any work(s) from the above periods.
Analyze cultural, political, contectual, and stylistic interdependence between diverse regions studied, including the Ancient Near East Egypt, The Aegean, Greece, Italy and Northern Europe.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 111  Art from the Renaissance through Contemporary Times  

This course analyzes and evaluates the artistic styles from the European Renaissance through the twenty first century global art. Painting, sculpture and architecture are studied as both individual works and as active participants in broader political, economic, socio-cultural, historical and environmental systems. Issues concerning iconography, social and geographic context, and biography will also be a focus of this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify representative art of the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and Expressionist periods.
The many "isms" of 20th Century Art as well as the art of the 21st Century Post-Modern Era will also be covered in this class.
Explain the techniques used in painting, sculpture and architecture of the period.
Define the technical terms associated with the description of art.
Identify stylistic changes affected by political, economic, socio-cultural, historical and environmental systems.
Interpret biographical data of the individual artists wherever possible.
Visually analyze stylistic differentiation of any work(s) from the above time periods.
Analyze cultural, political, contextual, and stylistic interdependence and differentation between diverse regions studied, including Europe, the Americans, Asia and Africa.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 112  Art From Africa, Asia and Beyond  

This course analyzes and evaluates the artistic styles of Asia including Buddhist and Hindu Art from India, Java, China, Korea and Japan. Arts of the Islamic world, Africa, Oceania and of the Americas including Native American Indian will also be analyzed and evaluated. Painting, sculpture and architecture are studied as both individual works and as active participants in broader political, economic, socio-cultural, historical, and environmental systems. Issues concerning iconography, social and geographical context, and biography will also be a focus of this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify representative art of lndia, Java, China, Korea, Japan, Islam, Africa, Oceania and the Americas.
Identify stylistic changes affected by political, economic, socio-cultural, historical and environmental systems.
Define the technical terms associated with the description of art.
Explain the techniques used in painting, sculpture and architecture of the periods.
Visually analyze and recognize any work(s) from the above periods.
Analyze cultural, political, contextual and stylistic interdependence and differentiation between diverse regions studied, including India, Java, China, Korea, Japan, Islam, Africa, Oceania and the Americas.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 115  History of Graphic Design  

This course analyzes and evaluates the field of graphic design, typography and visual communications from the earliest written languages through contemporary graphic design practice. The course will help the student develop a visual vocabulary, introduce major design figures and movements, provide a historical context for design thought and practice while emphasizing the design profession as an artistic discipline. The work examined in each era will be discussed in terms of its aesthetic, socio-cultural, economic, political, historical and environmental systems impact.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze and identify the stylistic distinctions among the various historic design movements.
Explain the techniques and tools used in the various design movements.
Define the technical terms associated with the graphic design industry.
Identify important historical artists and designers that contributed to the various historic design movements.
Identify aesthetic, economic, historical and environmental changes that affected the visual appearance of the various design movements.
Analyze cultural, political, contextual, and stylistic interdependence and differentiation between the diverse regions studied.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 116  History of Photography  

This course is a survey of the history of photography from complex events leading to its invention in 1839 to the diverse applications in our present day. The course will examine photography’s influence in shaping broader political, economic, socio-cultural, historical, and environmental systems, and its impact on science and technology. Students will be introduced to methods of historical research and investigation through a balance of lectures, discussions and fieldwork including the viewing of contemporary and historic photographic objects.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the artistic qualities of photography using major stylistic elements present in all photographs, including such elements as line, balance, depth of field, color and composition.
Discuss the historical development of photography from its scientific and technological perspectives.
Understand and discuss the crossover between other media and photography, and discuss the historical relationship between photography and other media.
Evaluate major photographers and their work, including the style of their work and historical significance.
Understand and discuss the ways in which photography has influenced contemporary and historic views of the world.
Discuss how photography shaped broader artistic, political, economic, socio-cultural, historical, and environmental systems.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 122  Two Dimensional Design  

This course is an introductory course that entails deliberate visual decision-making based on the elements and principles of design on a two-dimensional surface. A variety of media including wet, dry and or digital possibilities will be a focus of this course. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to apply the general principles of design including unity/variety, balance (symmetrical, asymmetrical, radial and crystallographic), emphasis, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale, and figure/ground relationship.
Manipulate the general elements of visual language including line, shape, volume texture and space.
Utilize the full grey scale including black and white.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 123  Color and Design  

This course will emphasize an in-depth study of the basic properties of color. Color-aid papers as well as pigment will serve as the basic media used in this course. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Manipulate properties of hue, value and chroma.
Understand the effects of light upon color within the context of warm and cool colors.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the 12-hue color wheel.
Understand the psychological and expressive qualities of basic color relationships.
Integrate critical thinking skills through completed artworks and critiques.

Prerequisites: ART 122 or GRA 122.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 124  Three Dimensional Design  

This course is an introductory course that entails deliberate decision-making based on the elements and principles of design within a three-dimensional space. A variety of media including traditional and non-traditional materials may be utilized through additive and subtractive methods. Historical and contemporary references may be used to investigate techniques and stimulate discussion toward conceptualizing, visualizing and execution. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to apply the general principles of design including unity/variety, balance (symmetrical, asymmetrical, radial and crystallographic), emphasis, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale, and figure/ground relationship within three dimensional space.
Manipulate and fabricate a variety of materials.
Articulate how design elements and principles may influence perception conceptually and aesthetically.
Utilize site-specific location, light and space.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: REA 050 or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 130  Drawing I  

This course is an introductory level foundation course in drawing. A variety of media and subject matter including still life will be a focus in this course. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to draw utilizing perceptual means incorporating the basic properties of line, value, scale, proportion, figure-ground relationship and texture.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane.
Produce cohesive composition.
Diagram perspective.
Create the illusion of three-dimensional forms and space on a two-dimensional plane.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 131  Drawing II  

This course will continue to stress general foundation drawing skills. A variety of wet and dry media including color media will be a focus in this course. Subject matter will expand from still-life to more conceptually based integration of various imagery. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to draw utilizing perceptual means incorporating the basic properties of line, value, scale and proportion, figure-ground relationship, texture and color.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane using traditional and non-traditional means.
Produce cohesive composition.
Manipulate the illusion of three-dimensional forms and spaces.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 130 or GRA 133.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 133  Photography I  

This course introduces students to visual language utilizing the medium of photography. Problems and assignments are structured to develop a personal vision and working knowledge of photographic materials and methods. Contemporary and historic styles in photography and composition will be introduced with an emphasis on aesthetic, technical, and conceptual practices. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the fundamental skills of camera and light meter operation.
Demonstrate the fundamental skills of darkroom procedures for film processing and printing.
Demonstrate an understanding of the photographic image in terms of light, shape, form and organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Make informed choices about composition when photographing and editing images.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 040 or MAT 050). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 134  Photography II for A.F.A. Majors  

This course continues the exploration into conceptual and technical proficiency with an emphasis on photography as fine art. Advanced techniques with camera work, film developing, printing and presentation will be discussed as well as the departure from traditional photographic practices, conventions and materials. Lecture, demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate camera skills that display a personal aesthetic approach to composition.
Demonstrate technical control over darkroom procedures for film processing and printing consistent with a personal vision.
Demonstrate experimental and manipulative techniques.
Make informed choices about composition when photographing and editing images.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 133.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 136  Drawing as a Design Process  

This course will focus on specific freehand drawing skills needed to be successful in the daily requirements of the advertising and commercial design fields through structural analysis of man made and natural forms. The elements of line shape, value and spatial organization will be stressed to develop drawings suitable for inclusion in the student's design portfolio. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Draw from observation using elementary forms and linear methods to achieve structure.
Analyze proportion and form to build complex geometric forms.
Create drawings using one-point, two-point, three-point and intuitive perspective techniques.
Employ the value scale to achieve volume and mass.
Apply rapid visualization processes to draw objects from memory.
Produce finished "symbol" drawings through the process of icon translation.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 130 or GRA 133.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 140  Painting I  

This is a foundation level studio course in acrylic painting with instruction of the use of brush and palette knife. Still life subject matter will be the predominant source of visual imagery in this course. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Prepare the materials for the process of painting.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the 12-hue color wheel.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane.
Produce cohesive composition through the student's direct observation of the subject.
Demonstrate the ability to analyze how light creates form with the interplay of hue, value and chroma.
Create the illusion of three-dimensional forms and space on a two-dimensional plane.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 050) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 141  Painting II  

This course will continue to stress general foundation painting skills in the acrylic and or mixed media. Subject matter will expand from the still-life to more conceptual based integration of various imagery. Demonstration discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Prepare the materials for the process of painting.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the 12-hue color wheel.
Produce cohesive composition.
Demonstrate the ability to analyze how light creates form with the interplay of hue, value and chroma.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane using traditional and non-traditional means.
Manipulate the illusion of three-dimensional forms and space.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 140.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 142  Life Drawing  

This course will emphasize life drawing from the nude and draped model. The figure will be studied as a singular form and studied as a form within the environment. Drawing with a variety of wet and dry media will be stressed in the course. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work. NOTE: Pre-Req may be waived by Department.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to draw the human figure utilizing perceptual means incorporation bold, gestural and quick mark-making skills.
Demonstrate the ability to draw the human figure utilizing perceptual means within a sustained pose incorporating properties of line, value, scale and proporation, figure-ground relationship, texture and tone.
Demonstrate the ability to draw the human figure incorporating basic knowledge of human anatomy and art historical connections.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane.
Produce cohesive composition.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 130 or GRA 133.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 144  Figure Painting  

This course will emphasize painting from the nude and draped model. The figure will be studied as a singular form and studied within the environment. Painting in the acrylic medium utilizing "engrisaille" techniques as well as utilizing the full color palette will be stressed in the course. Demonstration, discussion, and formal critiques will augment studio work. NOTE: Pre-Req may be waived by Department.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to paint the human figure utilizing perceptual means incorporating bold, gestural and quick mark-making skills.
Demonstrate the ability to paint the human figure utilizing perceptual means within a sustained pose incorporating the interplay of hue, value and chroma.
Demonstrate the ability to paint the human figure incorporating basic knowledge of human anatomy and art historical connections.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane.
Produce cohesive composition.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 140.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 145  Watercolor Painting  

This course is an introduction to the basic tools and techniques of the watercolor painter. Emphasis is placed upon transparent watercolor within the Western tradition in still life, landscape, figurative and non-objective subject matter. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Prepare the materials for the process of painting.
Demonstrate the knowledge and understanding of the 12-hue color wheel.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane.
Produce cohesive composition.
Apply the wash, glazing, graduated wash, wet into wet, lifting, scraping, resist, drops and splatter, and dry brush techniques within a watercolor painting.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 050 or MAT 060). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 190  ART Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit

ART 194  ART Internship (2 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

2 Credits

ART 199  ART Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 203  History of Modern Art  

This course surveys the artistic styles from early modernist ideas in the 19th century and Post-Impressionism to the 21st century. Painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and the numerous new media in art will be studied as individual works in relation to their cultural backgrounds. Issues of iconography, biography and other new methodologies will also be a focus of this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze representative art of Post-Impressionism, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, cubism, Dadaism, surrealism, constructivism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, New Realism, Regionalism, Post-Minimalism, Post Modernism, Neo-Expressionism, Neo-Conceptualism and most recent 21st century artworks.
Explain the techniques used in painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and other media of the period.
Define the technical terms associated with the description of art.
Identify stylistic changes affected by geography, politics, religion, gender, psyche and world events.
Interpret biographical data of the individual artists wherever possible.
Visually identify stylistic differences of any work (s) from the above time periods.
Apply research skills.

Prerequisites: ART 111 and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ART 208  Computer Illustration  

This course is an introduction to the computer as a drawing, illustration, and design tool. Students will gain an understanding of the creation of drawings and illustrations and their practical applications in digital media and art. Students will be given hands-on instruction on Apple Macintosh computers using a current object-oriented drawing program. Contemporary and historic styles of illustration, composition, and typography will be introduced with an emphasis on aesthetic, technical, and conceptual practices. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the fundamental skills of object-based drawing and illustration through perspective, scale, weight and proportion.
Utilize type as an expressive element.
Print Postscript graphics on black & white and color printers.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 122 or GRA 122) and (ART 130 or GRA 133).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 211  Digital Imaging  

This course is an introduction to the use of image editing software for the creation of dynamic images for print, web and multimedia applications. Special attention is given to scanning images, resolution formulas, appropriate file formats, color correction, organization of images, printing and prepress production, color management and image compositing. Students will be given hands-on instruction on Apple Macintosh computers using current image editing software. Contemporary and historic styles in imaging, photography and composition will be introduced with an emphasis on aesthetic, technical, and conceptual practices. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the fundamental skills of image manipulation, composition and compositing techniques.
Use online search tools for college-level research using appropriate hardware and software.
Print raster-based graphics on black and white and color printers.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: (ART 122 or GRA 122) and (ART 130 or GRA 133).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 213  Page Layout  

In this course, students gain an understanding of using the computer for the creation of publication design. Students complete several activities and tutorials in order to design a variety of creative documents that integrates type and graphics. Advanced features of computer-based publishing software for the production of multi-page color documents will be covered. Students will be given hands-on instruction on Apple Macintosh computers using industry standard publication software. Contemporary and historic styles in document layout, using grid construction and deconstruction, for composition will be introduced with an emphasis on aesthetic, technical and conceptual practices. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate fundamental skills of document design in a page layout program.
Select, specify and copyfit text and display type using correct terminology.
Utilize type as an expressive and integrated element with graphics.
Apply appropriate file management techniques for prepress.
Prepare a multiple-page document for output from a service bureau.
Utilize style sheets, master pages and templates to organize complex documents.
Utilize color-matching systems.
Print Postscript graphics on black & white and color printers.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 208 or GRA 208) and (ART 211 or GRA 211).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 215  Typography  

This intermediate level course for graphic design majors concerns itself with the characteristics and design applications of type used in printed and digital matter. Students plan and produce a series of portfolio-quality projects to explore the use of type as a design element. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Use the principles of positive/negative space, rhythm, texture and composition in manipulating letterforms as design elements.
Select appropriate typefaces that enhance verbal messages.
Identify and categorize commonly used type families.
Employ letter, word and line spacing that enhance the appearance and readability of type.
Arrange and assemble display and text in a page layout relating it to other design elements.
Apply typographic hierarchy to organize a page layout.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 123 or GRA 123) and (ART 208 or GRA 208).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 225  Prepress and Printing Processes  

In this course you will investigate digital file composition and the use of computing technology as it applies to the preparation of digital files for the printing industry. Printing and binding methods used to reproduce the work of the graphic designer will be studied. Technical, time and budget constraints are emphasized in order to relate design and production costs to real-world situations. Students will gain hands-on experience with a variety of graphics hardware and software commonly used for computer prepress. Coursework includes lecture, case study and field trips. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define design objectives and how work flows through the imaging process.
Identify and define line art and halftone reproduction processes.
Identify and define the most commonly used proofing methods and color systems.
Identify, characterize and select appropriate paper stock for various types of printing jobs.
Define and differentiate between the various commercial-printing methods.
Identify and define printing-related processes such as engraving, embossing, diecutting, foil stamping and the most commonly used bindery methods.
Identify and list the advantages, disadvantages and capabilities of different storage media and use of file compression utilities for file transfer and storage.
Perform font management activities.
Understand, use and apply calibration techniques to computer monitors and desktop scanners.
Apply troubleshooting techniques to hardware and software problems.
Output digital files on Postscript and non-postscript printers.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 208 or GRA 208) and (ART 211 or GRA 211).

Corequisites: ART 213 or GRA 213.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 227  Web Graphics  

This course introduces students to design for the World Wide Web (WWW). The focus of this course will be aesthetic design that is functional and that encourages, enhances, and simplifies the web browsing experience. Students learn to design effective interactive websites using industry standard software editors, the current versions of HTML and CSS and other web development software. Students will explore interface theory, design principles and develop visually rich web pages through hands-on experience. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Employ the theory and principles of effective user interface design.
Apply the basic design principles to the structure of HTML formatted web documents with emphasis on the visual aesthetic.
Organize effective navigation between various interface designs.
Apply basic HTML code to web documents using visual editing software.
Apply basic CSS code to enhance the visual appeal of the web page.
Use image-editing software to produce optimized web graphics.
Use a professional quality visual editor to develop and maintain web sites.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 123 or GRA 123) and (ART 208 or GRA 208) and (ART 211 or GRA 211).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 228  Motion Graphics  

This course introduces students to time-based graphics through animation. The focus of the course will be on developing a beginner-to-intermediate vector and bitmap animation for web delivery and related presentation applications. Students will learn to design effective timeline sequences incorporating vector-drawing techniques, tweening, frame-by-frame animation procedures, bitmap imagery, typographic techniques and basic scripting. Design theory for interactive media is coupled with hands-on experience for creating visually rich animations, web pages and presentations. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop a storyboard for time-based media.
Design vector objects and raster images for motion graphics with emphasis on the visual aesthetic.
Create basic animation sequences using vector-drawing tools.
Execute frame-by-frame and tweening for animating using a timeline.
Script basic commands for interactivity.
Design a user-friendly environment with an emphasis on aesthetics.
Create and utilize sound in a movie file.
Deliver optimized movies to appropriate audiences.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 123 or GRA 123) and (ART 208 or GRA 208) and (ART 211 or GRA 211).

Corequisites: ART 215 or GRA 215.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 230  Graphic Design I  

This is an intermediate level course for graphic design majors. Through a series of projects students learn to employ basic design concepts in solving different types of visual communications problems. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Combine type and image in a layout to communicate an idea or message.
Interpret and represent an idea by means of a mark or symbol.
Interpret advertising copy and incorporate it in a design.
Demonstrate visual gestalt principles in solving a design problem.
Use traditional graphic design tools and techniques to develop a design concept from sketch to tight comprehensive layout.
Evaluate visual solutions to design problems verbally and in writing.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 123 or GRA 123) and (ART 208 or GRA 208) and (ART 211 or GRA 211).

Corequisites: ART 215 or GRA 215.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 231  Graphic Design II  

This course is a continuation of Graphic Design I. In this course students refine skills and work habits related to the creative process for solving visual communication problems. Projects emphasize the development of design priorities and alternatives based on client need and production constraint. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Write and interpret the requirements of a design brief.
Apply basic design principles to the organization and use of type, color and composition in a multi-page publication.
Design and mock-up a basic package design.
Solve a simple interface design problem.
Present a design project to a client both verbally and visually.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 213 or GRA 213) and (ART 230 or GRA 230).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 232  Portfolio Seminar  

This advanced-level course for graphic design majors covers the creation and selection of artwork required in job, college transfer and co-op interview situations. Demonstration, discussion, independent study and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Select, critique and refine a body of personal artwork that represents a range of artistic abilities and media.
Mount and present artwork in a professional manner.
Create a logical sequence for personal artwork presentation.
Examine and select portfolio pieces appropriate for a specific interview.
Archive two and three-dimensional work on appropriate media.
Select a portfolio format appropriate for a specific audience.
Design and produce a self-promotional leave-behind.
Write and design a resume or intention letter.
Define and solve a design problem that exhibits integration of studio skills from several courses.
Make a portfolio presentation to a small group outlining project objectives, methods and materials.
Solve projects in a unique and creative manner.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 131 or GRA 134) and (ART 215 or GRA 215) and (ART 230 or GRA 230).

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 233  Portfolio Preparation  

This course is intended for the aspiring fine arts major who needs to prepare a portfolio for entry into a four year program. Each student will be assessed on an individual basis at the beginning of the course. Following this assessment the student will be mentored on an individual and group basis in order to prepare a portfolio displaying a breadth of media, subject matter, design approaches and concept. Course work will include, individual and group studio work and critiques.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Produce, select, critique and refine a body of work that represents a breadth of media, subject matter, design approaches and concept.
Demonstrate the ability to activate the concept of the picture plane.
Demonstrate the ability to work from direct observation incorporating the basic properties of line, value, figure-ground relationship, textures and color.
Produce original works of art displaying cohesive composition.
Create a logical and coherent body of work incorporating a high level of craftsmanship and professionalism indicative to the discipline.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 122 or GRA 122) and (ART 123 or GRA 123) and (ART 124 or GRA 121) and (ART 130 or GRA 133) and (ART 131 or GRA 134) and ART 140 and ART 141 and ART 142.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 236  Digital Photography I  

This course introduces students to digital photography and the computer as a darkroom tool. Students will gain an understanding of how digital cameras work, image capturing, manipulation and the fine art of making a digital print. Contemporary and historic styles in photography and composition will be introduced with an emphasis on aesthetic, technical, and conceptual practices. Demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work. Camera and additional expenses for photographic supplies are required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand technical and aesthetic differences between analog and digital photography.
Demonstrate the fundamental skills of camera and light meter operation.
Demonstrate proper camera and digital processing techniques in production of a work of art.
Demonstrate an understanding of the photographic image in terms of light, shape, form and organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Make informed choices about composition when photographing and editing images.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 040 or MAT 050). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 237  Alternative Processes  

In this course students will explore a wide variety of alternative photographic processes that include formula’s for light sensitive materials to create hand-applied emulsions. Students will learn how to make images with and without cameras or negatives and how to print them on non-traditional materials. Lecture, demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the photographic image in terms of light, shape, form and organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Demonstrate technical control over darkroom and non-darkroom procedures, processing, and printing with alternative photographic materials.
Demonstrate skills that display a personal aesthetic approach to alternative process materials.
Make informed choices about composition when photographing and editing images.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 123 or GRA 123) and (ART 133 or ART 160).

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 239  Digital Photography II  

In this course students will explore digital photography in relation to fine art. Students will be given assigned lectures, writings and will produce artwork using a digital camera. Discussions and lectures will focus on the physical, conceptual and theoretical characteristics of the digital media as it pertains to art and art making. Emphasis will be placed on the students' development of an understanding of the evolution of and the theory associated with art, photography and digital imaging.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate proper camera and digital processing techniques in production of a work of art.
Understand technical and aesthetic differences between traditional and digital photography.
Develop an understanding and knowledge of design concepts for Digital Media.
Make informed choices about composition when photographing and editing images.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of art

Prerequisites: ART 236.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 240  Medium and Large Format Photography  

This course introduces the student to Medium and Large Format Photography including camera movements, the Scheimpflug principle and other techniques unique to medium and large format cameras as well studio lighting. The formal and aesthetic concerns of creating images in medium and large format will be emphasized throughout the class. Lecture, demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of medium and large format cameras and components.
Demonstrate technical control over darkroom procedures for medium and large format film processing and printing consistent with a personal vision.
Demonstrate how to correct distortions associated with the optical aberrations using large format equipment.
Demonstrate the proper application and control over studio lighting.
Make informed choices about composition when photographing and editing images.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: (ART 123 or GRA 123) and ART 134.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours

ART 241  Portfolio Presentation  

This course is a capstone experience for students completing the photography program. Students will produce a professional portfolio and self-promotional materials. Topics include researching transfer schools, refining a body of work, selecting works for the portfolio, strategies for different portfolio delivery and presentation methods, writing artist statements, cover letters, resumes, and interviewing skills. Lecture, demonstration, discussion and formal critiques will augment studio work. NOTE: Pre-req 27 credits of ART toward Photography track AFA includes ART 237, Art faculty approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate technical ability and aesthetic judgment by producing an individually selected portfolio project.
Make critical aesthetic judgments regarding photographic composition, visual literacy, and the creative process in order to produce photographic images.
Demonstrate professional writing and interviewing skills for the purpose employment and transfer to another institution of higher education.
Produce content as an effective form of visual communication.
Practice critical thinking skills through the production and evaluation of artwork.

Prerequisites: ART 237.

Corequisites: ART 239 and ART 240.

3 Credits
 5 Weekly Lab Hours