Academic Catalog

Communication Studies (COMM)

COMM 100  Interpersonal Communication  

This course focuses on the theory and the practice of human communication with an emphasis on one-on-one (dyadic) communication in diverse relationships and various contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish between interpersonal communication and other types of human communication.
Describe the individual, cultural, and social factors that affect interpersonal communication.
Explain the interconnectedness of communication and culture within interpersonal relationships.
Explain the role of verbal and nonverbal expression in interpersonal relationships.
Explain the role of technology in interpersonal communication.
Describe the role of interpersonal communication in developing, negotiating, maintaining, and terminating relationships.
Identify listening styles and barriers to active listening.
Identify the consequences of different conflict management behaviors.
Describe the ethical responsibilities of a communicator.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Oral Communication (OC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 102  Communication Across Cultures  

This course focuses on communication among and between people of different cultures. It is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts, theories, and research pertaining to intercultural communication. Students can also expect to engage in in-class exercises, activities, and discussions regarding everyday encounters with people from different socio-economic (class) backgrounds, racial, ethnicities, sexual orientations, gender, physical abilities and religious belief systems.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the interconnectedness of communication and culture.
Demonstrate a self-awareness and an understanding of others' cultural values, beliefs, and communication styles.
Describe the influence of culture on one's identity formation and identity management.
Explain the role of language in perception and culture.
Describe the characteristics of intercultural conflict and culturally-based conflict styles.
Explain the cultural value orientation patterns held by different cultures.
Analyze the way the history (eg, political, intellectual, social, family, national, and cultural-group) informs an intercultural communication encounter.
Describe cultural shock and the various academic approaches to understanding it.

Prerequisites: COMM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 104  Introduction to Mass Communication  

This course introduces students to the industrialized production, distribution, regulation, consumption and analysis of print, electronic and new media industries. Students will review the history of mass communication in the media industries and explore career options in this field. They will also study the interrelated nature of media and society.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the origins of the media industries.
Analyze the impact of print, electronic and new media upon society.
Explain the changing nature of the media industries in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
Explain the convergence of media forms.
Assess the various mass communication career opportunities in the media industries.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 105  Small Group Communication  

A study of the techniques involved in effective group communication including: discussion, decision making, problem solving and resolving conflict in groups. Students learn theories of group dynamics and the nature of norms, goals, roles and leadership styles in small, task oriented groups. The class is a laboratory where students actively participate in structured group experiences requiring preparation and evaluation.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the dynamics of effective group communication needed to maintain a small group.
Identify and manage interpersonal conflicts in group settings.
Recognize and identify differences in culture and communication styles as they apply to small group communication.
Distinguish between defensive and supportive group communication climates.
Recognize each of the following as they apply to small group communication: role, individual goal, group goal, norm, group cohesion, and feedback.
Explain the principles necessary to lead a discussion or group meeting.
Participate productively in small group contexts.

Prerequisites: COMM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 111  Public Speaking  

This course enables students to deliver a variety of presentations. Students are introduced to various methods of delivery, organizational patterns, and types of presentational aids. Emphasis is placed on preparing presentations for multiple audiences and occasions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize appropriate techniques for managing communication apprehension.
Construct and deliver a variety of presentations.
Construct and use appropriately designed visual aids.
Locate and effectively incorporate supporting material drawn from a variety of sources.
Organize content in a logical manner according to presentation type.
Deliver a presentation employing effective stylistic techniques.
Demonstrate effective listening skills as both a speaker and a listener of presentations.
Demonstrate ethical responsibilities of a speaker.
Adapt presentation message to audience and occasion

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Oral Communication (OC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 115  Introduction to Public Relations  

This course treats public relations as communication-the process of organizations relating to their various "publics." Students explore the theory, principles and techniques of contemporary public relations as practiced in business, government, nonprofit and civic groups, cultural organizations, education and the community. Students prepare press releases, public service announcements, speeches, slide programs or other appropriate communication vehicles. For students in all curricula and programs.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe public relations as a communication function of organizations.
List 10 basic principles of effective public relations.
Identify and describe career opportunities/possibilities within the student's field of study, interests or aptitude area in public relations.
Cite examples from the American past of public relations campaigns or principles that changed a "public's" view of an organization, a movement, an institution or a tradition.
Anticipate and analyze critical and negative views of public relations.
Identify the use of communicative art forms such as music, poetry, art, dance, film or story telling, in any public relations campaign mounted by a significant American organization.
Use, where appropriate, contemporary technology such as desktop publishing or computer software or slide and sound show or photography or student-produced video in designing a public relations campaign on a contemporary American problem, organization or movement.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 190  Communications Internship  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit

COMM 194  Communications Internship  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

2 Credits

COMM 199  Communications Internship  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits

COMM 200  Argumentation and Debate  

To survive, compete, thrive and find success in an often-turbulent modern world requires a sound working knowledge of the rules of persuasion and the ability to use the tools of verbal reasoning, logic and evidence to support one's position.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate that he/she/they can effect change through the use of persuasive skill.
Debate both the affirmative and the negative positions of a current controversial proposition.
Prepare a "brief" showing the supportable positions on any contemporary social, political or economic question.
Use the principles of library research and nonprint media to support their persuasive position.

Prerequisites: COMM 111.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 201  Communication Theory  

This course examines the major paradigms within the study of human communication by introducing students to both historical and contemporary communication theories from various branches of the discipline. Students will evaluate and apply the theories in and across a variety of contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define theory.
Demonstrate an understanding of theory/model development.
Distinguish between the major paradigms within the communication discipline.
Identify key branches of study within the communication discipline.
Apply major communication theories.
Critique communication theories by identifying constructs and limitations.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours