Academic Catalog

English (ENG)

ENG 050  Developmental English  

This course is intended to prepare students for college-level writing by using a multi-step approach and providing a comprehensive review of grammar. Students will move from paragraph to essay writing while developing basic research skills. Students will develop their critical thinking skills through reading and writing. NOTE: Credits from the course are not applicable toward a degree.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate critical thinking and writing in various rhetorical situations.
Demonstrate awareness of the rhetorical situation by making appropriate choices for a given writing task.
Craft a thesis that can be supported with evidence in the body and conclusion.
Demonstrate that writing is a process.
Apply formal conventions of written American English with respect to grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.
Provide critical assessment of college-appropriate texts.
Synthesize basic research skills.

Prerequisites: ESL 044. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 099  ALP English  

ENG 099 provides individualized instruction and regular practice in writing essays for college audiences and critically reading and understanding college-level texts. Specific attention will be paid to effective reading strategies and a recursive understanding of the writing process. This course is part of DCCC's Accelerated Learning Program, which enables students to complete developmental coursework in English while simultaneously enrolling in ENG 100. This program enables students to develop their skills quickly and to complete their college English requirements faster than with the typical sequential approach to these classes. Students wishing to enroll in college level courses with ENG 099, have the option to enroll in any of the following courses: HIS 110, HIS 120, HIS 150, HIS 160, HUM 160, SOC 110 or SOC 120. NOTE: Corequisite - Every section of ENG 099 will be linked to a section of ENG 100 taught by the same instructor. Students who register for a section of ENG 099 must simultaneously register for the corresponding ENG 100 section.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Practice effective writing strategies for all steps of the writing process, including invention, planning, drafting, revising, and editing.
Write for various contexts with an awareness of audience.
Write thesis-driven essays that are clearly organized and developed with appropriate evidence.
Demonstrate critical reading skills by annotating, analyzing, and thoughtfully responding to a variety of challenging texts.
Demonstrate critical reading, thinking, and writing in various rhetorical situations and make appropriate rhetorical choices for given writing tasks.
Demonstrate proficient comprehension of and a critical assessment of college-appropriate texts using strategic and critical reading.
Practice basic research skills such as developing a research question, accessing reliable sources, and evaluating content.
Manage commonly experienced obstacles to effective writing, such as procrastination and writing-related anxiety.
Demonstrate intellectual engagement through regular, punctual attendance and active, in-class participation.

Concurrent: ENG 100

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 100  English Composition I  

This course reviews the principles of composition, including rhetoric, grammar and usage. It emphasizes critical thinking, the recursive nature of writing, the writing of analytical essays, and the application of information literacy skills.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply college-level critical thinking and writing in various rhetorical situations.
Compose original, thesis-based essays with cogent, well-supported evidence.
Use appropriate rhetorical techniques for a specific writing task.
Demonstrate organizational skills in constructing an essay with an introduction, conclusion, and transitions.
Explore and evaluate appropriate academic databases to find credible primary and secondary sources.
Synthesize appropriate sources to produce a research paper with accurate documentation.
Employ prewriting, drafting, and revision strategies.
Apply formal conventions of standard English with respect to grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Information Literacy (IL), Written Communication (WC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

ENG 112  English Composition II: Writing About Literature  

ENG 112 is a writing course emphasizing both literature and information literacy skills that reinforce basic principles of composition learned in ENG 100. The course develops critical thinking through the study of literature and the use of advanced research techniques to write analytical/critical and research essays.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate critical thinking and writing in response to literature.
Compose original, thesis-based analytical/critical essays in response to literature.
Express ideas logically and clearly using appropriate rhetorical techniques.
Analyze fiction, poetry, drama, and other literature using the elements of literature from different critical perspectives.
Access and evaluate source material using current information literacy skills.
Synthesize source material using MLA documentation in a plagiarism-free, multi-source essay/research paper based on a work of literature.
Revise, edit, and proofread to produce final drafts applying formal convention of American English with respect to grammar, mechanics and punctuation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Information Literacy (IL), Written Communication (WC)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 115  Research for English Majors  

This course introduces English majors to the organization, retrieval and evaluation of electronic and print information in their field. Students will understand the evolving nature of information in the digital age. Emphasis will be on developing viable research questions, using academic library systems effectively, evaluating traditional and emerging scholarly resources in a variety of formats, and using the information in an ethical manner by citing resources according to current MLA standards.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish between literary criticism; book, film and theater reviews; and biographical articles.
Identify critical approaches to literature, such as feminist, Marxist, reader-response, psychoanalytical, etc.
Identify major journal databases and aggregate databases in their field (includes e-books and e-ref books) such as JSTOR and the Gale Literature Resource Center.
Use advanced features of databases, such as Boolean searching, limiters, etc.
Become familiar with features of online book catalogs at Delaware County Community College Library and other academic and public libraries.
Evaluate literacy criticism in books and essays.
Use reference book/e-books, handbooks and Internet to retrieve cultural, historical and background information on authors, literary movements, timelines and literary theories.
Evaluate the role of “free” Internet web sites in the field of English and related areas of study, such as grammar sites, ready reference sites, citation generators, Google Books, Google Scholar, Open Source Movement.
Demonstrate knowledge of MLA citation standards for a variety of resources.
Be aware of software and user services relevant to their field, such as subscription citation generators (endnote, refworks), turnitin, and smarthinking.
Compose and present original literary analysis in both print and multimedia forms.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 130  Fundamentals of Journalism I  

This is a writing-intensive course designed for students contemplating a career in journalism. The course will focus on the principles and techniques of journalism with an emphasis on the print media, primarily weekly and daily newspapers. Topics include the nature of news, news gathering techniques, news reporting, digital journalism, ethics of journalism and journalism law.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define "news".
Discuss the impact of electronic media on print media.
Explain the organization and hierarchy of a typical newspaper.
Define newspaper terms.
Interview sources.
Write a lead.
Write news and feature copy according to AP Style.
Create a blog.
Explain journalism law with respect to libel and invasion of privacy.
Identify and summarize three ethical philosophies pertaining to journalism.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 131  Fundamentals of Journalism II  

This writing intensive course is designed for students contemplating a career in journalism, public relations or advertising. Students will continue to practice news gathering and writing techniques learned in Fundamentals of Journalism I (ENG130) as well as techniques in copy editing. While doing so, students will assist in the writing, editing and production of the campus newspaper. Students will also learn to write copy for public relations, advertising and broadcast media.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Write and edit news and feature stories according to AP Style.
Edit news and feature stories using copy-editing symbols.
Submit articles electronically to an editor.
Write broadcast copy.
Write advertising copy.
Write a news release.
Create a press kit for a public relations event.

Prerequisites: ENG 130.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 205  Creative Writing: Introduction  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine and create various elements of prose and poetry. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help move them from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; over the course of the semester, students will read, analyze and critique classmates’ submissions, a process which will help yield more effective works of prose and poetry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the elements necessary to build effective works of poetry and prose.
Create prose that demonstrates the ability to establish developed character that can move through a narrative structure.
Craft poetry that effectively employs sound, imagery and structure.
Examine and evaluate prose and poetry to create a body of polished work that demonstrates knowledge of the effectual elements of each genre.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic poetry and prose.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 206  Creative Writing: Non-Fiction and Memoirs  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of nonfiction. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; students will read, analyze and critique classmates' submissions. In addition to writing their own works, students will read a wide range of published nonfiction and should have a basic understanding of the various modes within the genre.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and discuss the work of important nonfiction texts in terms of structure, dramatic arc, central metaphors and symbols, physicality, and dialogue.
Describe the different types of creative nonfiction: personal essay, memoir, travel writing, profile/biography, feature article/literacy journalism, food writing, etc.
Gather research for a nonfiction piece.
Create nonfiction pieces that include narrative, scene development, character development, dialogue, description, and reflection.
Compose drafts and develop a revision plan.
Share work with fellow writers with a intent of considering feedback and potentially incorporating the ideas of others.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 207  Creative Writing: An Introduction to Playwriting  

This course introduces students to the concepts of dramatic writing, with an emphasis on character and structure. The course is intended to provide the student with practical experience in the creative process of composing stage-worthy plays.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and discuss the work of important playwrights in terms of structure, dramatic arc, central metaphors and symbols, physicality, and dialogue.
Describe the standard format of play.
Research ideas for use in plays.
Formulate different dramatic ideas.
Create dialogue, characters, and relationships intended for the stage.
Compose and revise plays.
Share work with fellow writers with the intent of listening to feedback and potentially incorporating the ideas of others into the work.
Work with actors to refine dialogue.
Use physical-mental exercises to inspire and sustain dramatic writing.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 208  Creative Writing II - Short Story  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of fiction. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; each week, students will read, analyze and critique classmates’ submissions—a process which will help yield vivid characters, compelling scenes and sustained conflict.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the elements necessary to build effective works of fiction, including: characterization, narration, setting, scene, plot, theme and conflict.
Create works of fiction that demonstrate the ability to lead characters through a cohesive narrative structure.
Analyze and evaluate prose in order to discern the literary elements which produce the most success in prose.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic and effectual works of fiction.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 209  Creative Writing: Poetry  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of poetry. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; students will read, analyze and critique classmates' submissions - a process which will help yield proficiency and understanding of form, vivid imagery, and compelling use of language and wordplay.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize and understand the elements necessary to build effective poems, including; music and sound, figurative language, persona and voice, imagery, theme and tone.
Create poems that demonstrate the ability to purposefully utilize language in a cohesive lyric or narrative structure.
Analyze and evaluate poetic techniques and elements in order to discern which produce the most successful verse in a given context or purpose.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic and effectual poetic works.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 214  Women in Literature  

Women in Literature is a course that allows students to look at women as they are perceived by others and as they perceive themselves. Through literary creations supplemented by films, speakers, articles and anecdotal contributions from students, we will look at women from a variety of ethnic, social and racial groups, including but not limited to African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos and Native Americans. As part of the study of literature by and about women in our world, students will also consider some of the historical, political, economic and religious realities that have shaped and continue to shape our perceptions of women.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the roles of women reflected in selected literature.
Construct a series of response essays that demonstrate a critical analysis of the literature under discussion.
Demonstrate research and documentation skills through the exploration of a selected topic.
Explain the roles of women in literature in terms of economic, political and social issues.
Identify literary contributions by women of color who traditionally have had no "voice," such as African American, Asian American, Chicano and Native American writers.
Analyze the literary elements of the works studied.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 215  Mystery and Detective Fiction  

This course is a study of the genre of mystery and detective fiction. It will focus on the development of the genre and the evolution of its various schools such as Golden Age mysteries, hard-boiled detective novels, and the police procedural. The course will also call attention to the cultural contexts in which these writings were produced.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify literature as the product of a particular cultural climate.
Examine the role of literary elements in the reading selection.
Recognize the characteristics of the distinct schools within the mystery and detective fiction genre.
Compose critical essays that analyze mystery and detective fiction.
Discuss the development of mystery and detective fiction genre.
Trace the correlations between mystery and detective fiction and other literacy genres.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 216  Science Fiction Literature  

This course is a study of speculative writing that creatively represents the hard sciences and/or the social sciences in fiction. It will focus on the different subgenres found within the genre and will call attention to the cultural contexts in which these writings were produced.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify literature as the product of a particular cultural climate.
Discuss the development of science fiction as a genre and its relationship to other literacy genres.
Discuss the characteristics of the different subgenres within the genre of science fiction.
Recognize the ways in which science fiction writers encourage critical assessment of the real world.
Examine the use of literacy elements found in the reading selections.
Compose critical essays that analyze science fiction.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 220  British Literature I  

This is a survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the pre-Romantics with attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices and styles of writing in British literature from the medieval era to the pre-Romantic period.
Discuss British literary works by and about marginalized-underrepresented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze British literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historical contexts and/or critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA guidelines.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 221  British Literature II  

This is a survey of British literature from the Romantics to the Moderns with the attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices, and styles of writing in British literature from the Romantic period to the post WWII era.
Discuss British literary works by and about marginalized/under-represented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze British literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historic contexts and/or other critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA documentation guidelines.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 222  Introduction to Shakespeare  

This course is a study of representative Shakespearean plays set against the literary, political and social setting that spawned them. Attention is paid to Shakespeare's influence not only in the development of the drama, but also in the literary tradition of the English-speaking world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the particular types of plays and poetic verse of Shakespeare.
Reconstruct the text of Shakespeare's plays in order to view them as dramatic productions.
Examine how literary elements function within Shakespeare's work.
Read and comprehend Shakespeare's language.
Analyze Shakespeare's writings as products of the Renaissance cultural climate.
Recognize the correlations between historical context and literary sources in Shakespeare's work.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 230  American Literature I  

This is a survey of American literature from the colonial era through the end of the Civil War with attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices, and styles of writing in American literature from the colonial era to 1865.
Discuss American literary works by and about marginalized / underrepresented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze American literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historical contexts and/or critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA guidelines.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 231  American Literature II  

This is a survey of American literature from 1865 to the present with attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices, and styles of writing in American literature from 1865 to the present.
Discuss American literary works by and about marginalized / under-represented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze American literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historical contexts and/or critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA guidelines.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 240  World Literature I  

The selective study of great representative literary works of the world from antiquity to modern times with emphasis on their social, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds. Special attention is given to the literature of continental Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the major characteristics of early literature (the ancient world to the Renaissance) from Asia, North and South America, Europe, Oceania, and Africa as these relate to literary artifacts.
Discuss in writing how literature works in conversation across cultures by demonstrating an understanding of global and historical themes, influences, and styles as these relate to both specific cultural stories and to stories across cultures.
Compare and contrast literary form and content, including genres, authorship, and styles of writing, that allow us to differentiate and compare stories from across the globe.
Compose essays that analyze literary works, including those or marginalized or under-represented peoples, in relation to various social, economic and historic contexts, and/or aesthetic traditions.
Demonstrate an ability to analyze and/or synthesize secondary sources, use current information literacy techniques, and document sources according to MLA-style in the context of a multi-source project.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 241  World Literature II  

This course continues the balanced, selective study of great representative literary works from the Renaissance to the present day in their geographic, historic, socio-economic, and political contexts. Attention is given to genres, writing styles, and applicable critical approaches. The "emerging" literatures--works by women, colonials, post-colonials and those groups generally denied a voice--are studied in an attempt to enlarge the cannon and render it inclusive.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major writers and their influences in and contributions to world literature.
Discuss dominant themes/genres/writing styles in the established and emerging literatures.
Identify major historical and philosophical influences of modern life as they are represented in literary artifacts.
Demonstrate in discussions and writing an awareness of the struggle of writers of the emerging literatures to find a voice, an audience, and a hearing.
Respond to the writers and literature encountered in the form of critical, analytical, and/or argumentative multi-source essays that employ current information literacy techniques and apply correct MLA documentation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 243  Topics in Contemporary Literature  

This course is a study of literature that has been produced in the past few decades. It may feature selected topics and/or themes from a variety of fiction, drama, and poetry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify various themes and techniques found in postmodern literature such as irony, pastiche, intertextuality, metafiction, temporal distortion, etc.
Identify literature as the product of a particular cultural climate.
Recognize the ways in which postmodern literature is a response to modern literature.
Examine the use of literacy elements found in the reading selections.
Compose critical essays that analyze the reading selections.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 245  Black American Literature  

Black American Literature is a comprehensive survey of the writings of African Americans beginning with the 18th century through the present. By way of reading, lecture and discussion, students will analyze the various genres, topics, mores and traditions identified with African Americans and their historical and cultural significance.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the roles of African Americans in the larger culture as reflected in selected literature.
Trace historical developments among Blacks in America from their African roots through slavery, the Civil War and the industrialized 20th century.
Analyze literary elements of the works studied.
Discuss the origins of racial stereotypes, discrimination and segregation as they appear in selected works.
Write an essay discussing the aforementioned topics.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 250  Children's Literature  

This course is a critical and analytical study of a variety of texts that represent the many genres of children's literature. It will emphasize how children are influenced by literature and how children's literature reflects the values of the particular culture that produces it.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the characteristics of the different genres of children's literature.
Determine and apply criteria for what may be considered as quality children's literature.
Analyze literary elements such as theme, character, and setting.
Evaluate the contributions that illustrations can make to a text.
Identify literature as a product of a particular cultural climate.
Discuss critically issues of gender, ethnicity, culture, and the individual that are present in the texts.
Design and research a written project that relates to a student's particular interest in children's literature.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours