Academic Catalog

History (HIS)

HIS 110  American History I  

An inquiry into the history of the United States from the introduction of African and European peoples into the existing populations of the Americas through the period of the Civil War. Includes the cultural origins and initial interactions of African, European and Native American peoples in the Western Hemisphere and the initial phases of a global economy, British Colonization and the establishment of diverse cultures in North America, the Period of the American Revolution, Confederation and Constitution, the establishment of unique political, social and economic structures in the early Republic, cultural and political conflict between Free and Slave States, and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explore variables of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religious background to demonstrate the diversity of American cultural development in colonizing America and the early history of the United States.
Discuss historical information regarding the foundation and formation of the United States to promote a global understanding of the interdependence of peoples and nations that can be used to create dialogue on meaningful and relevant events in their own place and time.
Develop analytical skills through an evaluation of cause and effect of events from pre-Colonization to the Civil War to suggest how and why events happen based upon historical fact sets.
Develop critical thinking skills through an explanation of the significance of historical information within varying contexts, theoretical models and methods.
Explain the difference between types of evidence and interpretation to give students a clear understanding of how to use evidence and commentary from primary and secondary sources to develop interpretive frameworks on a variety of information types.
Use social science methods and models to give students effective tools to compose their own interpretations in both oral and written formats.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 120  American History II  

An inquiry into the history of the United States from the Reconstruction to the present; includes the process of reconstruction of the Union and the rise of Jim Crow, post-Civil War industrialization, immigration and urbanization, the Western frontiers, the emergencies of the Labor Movement, United States diplomatic history, the Progressive Era, World War I, post-war prosperity and the Great Depression, New Deal policy and diplomacy, World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam, Civil Rights Movement and various social movements of the 1960s, the America in the a globalizing world in the latter part of the 20th century.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop critical thinking skills to analyze the political, economic, diplomatic and military changes that have occurred from the Reconstruction to the present.
Explore variables of Race, Ethnicity, Class, Sexuality, and Religious Background to demonstrate the Diversity of American Cultural Development.
Extract facts and commentary from primary and secondary sources to compose historical interpretations in both oral and written formats.
Discuss history historical information to promote an intellectual capacity to create dialogue on meaningful and relevant events in their own place and time.
Analyze the development of the United States in a global framework.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 150  World Civilizations I  

An introductory history of the development of the world's major civilizations to 1500. The course emphasizes the role of economic, social, and political change throughout the ancient and medieval periods of world civilization. Students will gain a greater understanding of the foundations of world civilizations and cultures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Think critically and analytically about the development and nature of separate world cultures created over several centuries.
Explain the creation of the political, economic, social, and religious foundations and stratification of civilization in the ancient period to 1500.
Understand how societies devised different solutions to key difficulties in forging a durable civilization.
Comprehend the role of geography and environment in the development of diverse civilizations.
Understand of the roots of the modern world through the examination of ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and socio-economic diversity of ancient world civilizations.
Discuss the implications of early aspects of globalization in world history.
Utilize information literacy of a variety of source material to examine and discuss world history.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 160  World Civilizations II  

An introductory history of the development of the world's major civilizations since 1500. The course emphasizes the role of economic, social, and political change throughout modern world history. Students will gain a greater appreciation for the interaction and interdependence of nations and cultures within the modern world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Think critically and analytically the development and nature of separate world cultures created over several centuries.
Understand the creation of a global community from 1500 through the twentieth century.
Explain how societies devised different responses to globalization.
Understand the creation of the contemporary world through analysis of the major historical themes from 1500 through the twentieth century.
Comprehend the ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and socio-economic diversity of global societies since 1500.
Utilize information literacy and a variety of source material to examine modern world history.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 190  History Internship  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. pon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE Prerequisites: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

HIS 194  History Internship  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. pon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE Prerequisites: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 199  History Internship  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE Prerequisites: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits

HIS 200  Civil War and Reconstruction  

This course encompasses the critical period of American history from 1850 to 1877. It examines the political, social, diplomatic and economic aspects of the Antebellum, Civil War and Reconstruction periods. It also emphasizes the military and naval activities of the time. Students will be introduced to scholarly writings and research about the primary and secondary sources dealing with the American Civil War and Reconstruction.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the causes, major events, and ramifications of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Think and write critically and analytically about the political, social, diplomatic and economic issues concerning the American Civil War and Reconstruction, its causes, and its outcomes, with an emphasis upon the concepts of Modern War and Total War.
Utilize information literacy to become familiar with scholarly literature and identify differing points of view on controversial political, social, diplomatic, and economic topics pertaining to the American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Utilize information literacy to identify, read, comprehend and synthesize primary and secondary sources dealing with the political, social, diplomatic, and economic aspects of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Evaluate the successes and failures of the American Civil War and Reconstruction with emphasis upon their significance in the issues of race, politics, and culture in American today.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 201  African-American History  

This course is an introductory survey course in black history. It exposes students to the roles played by Africans and people of African descent in world history.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Trace African heritage and culture in both Africa and the United States.
Evaluate the contributions and influence of African people in the development of Western Culture.
Describe the experience and contributions of Afro-Americans in the United States.
Assess the history of the African continent in terms of cultural, political and economic factors from the earliest periods to the present, including Sub-Saharan/Islamic Africa, the pre-colonial eras and post-World War II development.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 224  History of the First World War  

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major causes, events, and ramifications of the Great War. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the problems that led to the conflict, the major events that shaped its outcome, and the effects of the war that still resonate today. Students will also be exposed to primary and secondary sources pertaining to the Great War.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the causes, major events, and ramifications of the Great War.
Think and write critically and analytically about issues concerning the Great War,its causes, and its outcomes; with an emphasis upon the concepts of Modern War, Total War and Global War.
Utilize information literacy to become familiar with scholarly literature and identify differing points of view on controversial topics pertaining to the Great War.
Utilize information literacy to identify, read, comprehend, and synthesize primary and secondary sources dealing with the Great War.
Recognize how the Great War still resonates in the today's global issues.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 225  History of the Second World War  

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major causes, events, and ramifications of the Second World War. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the problems that led to the conflict, the major events that shaped its outcome, and the effects of the war that still resonate today. Students will also be exposed to primary and secondary sources pertaining to the Second World War.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the causes, major events, and ramifications of the Second World War.
Think and write critically and analytically about issues concerning the Second World War, its causes, and its outcomes; with an emphasis upon the concepts of Modern War, Total War, and Global War.
Utilize information literacy to become familiar with scholarly literature and identify differing points of view on controversial topics pertaining to the Second World War.
Utilize information literacy to identify, read, comprehend, and synthesize primary and secondary sources dealing with the Second World War.
Recognize how the Second World War still resonates in today’s global issues.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 235  20th Century World History  

Twentieth Century World History is a course where students will closely examine many of the major events that have played a role in forming much of the contemporary world. Liberalism, Capitalism, Socialism and various forms of Nationalism will be explored through events like World War I and World War II, the Cold War and Post-Colonial liberation movements to show the progress and poverty of human civilization in its latest developments. The course ends with topics like the Internet and the War on Terror to shed light on the dawning of the 21st century.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop critical thinking skills in the analysis and evaluation of global cultural, political, diplomatic, economic and military events that have occurred in the 20th century.
Understand variables of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religious background to understand issues of global diversity in events such as the Holocaust, the Russian Revolution and Islamic Jihadism.
Comprehend the differences between various forms of evidence and commentary through examining some of the most important primary sources of the 20th century , which will enable the student to develop historical interpretations in both oral and written formats.
Discuss historical information and ideas from disparate sources like Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points to Adolph Hitler's writings in Mein Kampf to promote an intellectual capacity to create dialogue on meaningful and relevant events in their own place and time.
Analyze the development of human behavior in a global framework, and note the global impact of a variety of topics from World Wars, to the use of fossil fuels to the internet.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 252  Women in History  

This is a survey course in Women's History. It will not only focus on the historical struggles to attain status but will also examine dominant thought within the discipline such as feminism, postmodernism, Womanist and global theories as related to women.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the evolution of the biological, ideological and political subordination of women.
Examine the different facets of social activism to achieve extension of academic and political rights.
Investigate the dominant issues relating to women such as health, reproductive rights, employment and violence.
Contrast the economic and social status women's lives in different countries and the role of culture in determining their status.
Explore the cultural expressions of women that give definition to their lives.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 256  History of Modern Islam  

A inquiry into the history of the Islam and the Middle East from the life of the Prophet Mohammed, through the cultural and political spread of Islamic peoples into Africa and Europe with the Caliphate, to the Islamic Renaissance of the Early Middle Ages, the Empires of the Ottomans, Safavids and Moguls and into the 20th century with the rise of oil and secular states. The course will complement existing courses on the religion of Islam to show the intersection of religion with political and cultural institutions as they spread from the core Islamic lands in the Arabian Peninsula to the broader world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Assess the causes and effects of major events and developments within the Islamic World and the Middle East.
Trace the origin and the early history of Islamic culture as an outgrowth of the life of the Prophet Mohammed and Arabic culture.
Note the spread of Islam and the rise of extensive scientific, artistic and cultural development with the Islamic Renaissance of the Early Middle Ages, which will begin the expansion of the growth and prosperity of Western Civilization.
Examine the Middle East's role in energy production in the 20th century and how the beliefs of Islam inform economic policy in the emerging global economy.
Draw distinctions and continuities through time with the ongoing battle between secularism and fundamentalism in the Islamic world.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours