Academic Catalog

Humanities (HUM)

HUM 100  Introduction to Visual Arts  

This course introduces students, through a broad overview, to the nature of art, the people who make art, forms of art takes and the cultural significance of art. Students consider the various roles of artists and how those roles evolved historically within a socio-cultural context. Additionally, students will learn how global concerns affecting marginalized populations, politics, economics, technology, and the environment impact the art that is produced. A thorough introduction to the elements and principles of design will lay the foundation for visual literacy on which students will analyze and critique various disciplines including drawing, painting, photography, film, video, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and environmental design. Issues concerning aesthetics, creativity, and perception will also be addressed in this course. NOTE: Alternate pre-requisite - permission of the instructor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify several themes and purposes of art.
Identify the visual elements and apply them in analysis of various two-and three-dimensional media.
Identify the principles of design in art.
Apply principles of design and personal aesthetics to criticism and analysis of various art media.
Demonstrate an understanding of a comprehensive list of terms common in the art world and apply those terms in written criticism.
Demonstrate a knowledge of a variety of roles artists have assumed in society.
Demonstrate a knowledge of the traits characteristic of these artists and their styles.
Demonstrate a knowledge of tools, methods and materials used in a broad spectrum of two-and three-dimensional media.
Demonstrate a sense of the chronological history of the arts.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 110  Early Cultures through the Middle Ages  

This survey course introduces students to various cultural constructs within a global context. Students will examine and discuss similarities and differences of socio-cultural, historical gender, religious and environmental struggles from prehistoric times through the middle ages. Literature, the visual/performing arts and archaeology practices will be used to study social equity, economic issues, and basic theories of the early human experience. Furthermore, this course will help students gain an understanding and critical awareness as they experience the broader world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the artistic, social, cultural and religious achievements of the first civilizations.
Explain the historical and aesthetic development of various cultural patterns from per-history to the Renaissance.
Articulate the contributions of diverse peoples to literature, government, religion, visual and performing arts.
Articulate the major aesthetic principles of poetry, prose, painting, music, architecture and sculpture within this time period.
Trace the influences of these earlier cultures on the present day global community.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 120  Renaissance Humanism to Twenty-First Century Globalism  

This course continues the survey begun in HUM 110 of the cultural legacy of the global community. In an historical context, students will survey the literature and the visual and performing arts of various societies from the Baroque (17th century) to the Post-Modem (21st century) period. Students will also examine the impact of science and technology, as well as the social and cultural realities in this period.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the artistic, social, cultural and religious achievements from the Baroque to the 21st century.
Explain the historical and aesthetic development of various cultural patterns from the Baroque to the 21st century.
Articulate the contributions of diverse peoples to literature, science, religion, visual and performing arts, and modern technology.
Articulate the major aesthetic principles of poetry, prose, painting, music, architecture and sculpture within this time period.
Trace the influences of these more recent cultures on the present day global.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 121  Myth  

This writing-intensive course surveys ancient and modern world myths that still have an impact on our self-concepts and/or inform our ideas of society, power, and social structure. Narrative myths are studied as well as their interpretations in visual art and music. Beginning with a focus on Babylonian and Egyptian mythology, the course uses literature, art, music and film to evaluate mythology's place in helping us to understand the human condition and in understanding how humans perceive and structure society. Readings vary from semester to semester, but will include stories from major world mythologies, various geographic regions, and various historical periods, for example Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Germanic, Asian, North and South American, African, and Australian traditions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze and interpret myths to gain an understanding of how they function and change within/across historical contexts, societies, groups, and cultures.
Identify and paraphrase mythological themes and motifs that are universal across world cultures.
Identify how mythic stories reveal and support social structures and cultural values.
Compare aspects of myth-based fiction as seen in film, novels, popular culture, and television.
Identify versions of myths in rituals, visual art, and music.
Analyze in writing and discussion the differences between the original myths and their current manifestations.
Demonstrate the concept of “storytelling” rights as these relate to power and prestige.
Discuss in writing how myths/stories can construct ideas about race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation and how stories can be used to institutionalize inequities.
Using elements of the writing process, produce a well-documented, well-researched final paper on an assigned topic in mythology.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU), Written Communication (WC)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 141  Film Language  

This course is intended to engage students in analysis of the film medium, to help them relate the art of film to their lives and their language and to stimulate their appreciation of the visible world. The course includes a brief survey of film history, a study of the subject matter and bias of the documentary film and visible forms of poetry in the art film. NOTE: Alternate pre-requisite - permission of instructor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify types of films.
Recognize stages in film history.
Identify elements of cinematic technique.
Discuss the aesthetics of film.
Recognize the existence of varying critical approaches.
Recognize a good film.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 142  American Cinema  

This introductory course in film studies surveys American motion pictures as an industry, a form of artistic expression and a powerful cultural and societal influence. Students taking this course as distance learning should be aware of its independent study aspects.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate a familiarity with American film history from the silent screen to the present.
Demonstrate a knowledge of the basic technical and critical vocabulary of motion pictures.
Apply that vocabulary to understand artistic expression in motion pictures.
Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of the movie industry's economic structure as it evolved through the twentieth century.
Demonstrate an informed view of "realism" in motion pictures in order to avoid passive acceptance of what is presented on the screen.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 160  Introduction to World Religions  

This course introduces students to the five major religions of the world: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. We will read, research and discuss the historical, ethical and spiritual foundation of each religion, its beliefs and practices, in order understand its place in the perennial search for Truth and its relevance in the world today. The goal of this course is to set the stage for authentic inter-religious dialogue to prevent religious conflict and dogmatic discrimination.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the developmental stages of each of the five major religions.
Evaluate the principal tenets of each of these belief systems.
Describe the most important practices of each of these religions.
Analyze the inter-relative or conflicting theological, social and historical tenets of the five religions discussed from a global perspective.
Recognize how the tenets or beliefs of each religion fostered or hindered integration or separation within their cultural background and in comparison to the other religions discussed.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 162  Islam  

This class is an in-depth analysis of the historical, religious, ethical and political foundations of ISLAM, including the life of the prophet Mohommed, the Qur'an and its various branches, especially Sufism.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Improve their reading comprehensive and writing skills.
Improve their research skills (traditional and on-line).
Understand the development and history of Islam.
Understand the relationship between Islam and the other Judeo-Christian traditions.
Recognize the important cultural and spiritual contributions of Islam.
Describe the most important rituals and tenets of Islam.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 168  Buddhism  

This class is an in-depth analysis of the historical, philosophical, religious and ethical foundations of Buddhism, including the life of Gautama Siddhartha, the three major branches of Buddhism (i.e. Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana) and Buddhism in the West. Some basic meditation instruction will be included in the course. NOTE: Recommended Pre-Req - HUM 160

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Conduct college-level research-traditional and online on the critical aspects of Buddhism.
Understand the relationship between Buddhism and other religious traditions.
Describe the essential aspects of Buddhist philosophy at the college level.
Understand the historical development of Buddhism.
Develop an informed approach to Buddhist culture and religion.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 205  Latino American Culture  

This course provides an overview of the Latino-American cultural heritage. Based on elements from anthropology, culture (both folk and popular), film, folklore, language and linguistics, theater and drama, and literature, the course examines various cultural traditions within Latino-American society.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and describe significant events and factors that have characterized and influenced the various traditional, folk and popular cultures of Latinos residing in the United States.
Identify major Latino personalities and their contributions to culture in the United States.
Demonstrate the ability to describe the cultural experiences of Latinos as residents and citizens in the United States.
Describe the contributions of Latinos to American culture.
Apply course concepts and use appropriate terminology when describing the Latino cultural experience.
Conduct a research project and make a presentation on a significant topic or issue relating to Latino-American culture.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 212  The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Florence  

Through an experiential approach, students will study the Renaissance as it flowered in Florence, the Italian city most associated with the birth of that cultural/historical era and its emphasis on humanism. Students will be introduced to the landmarks of Florentine history from its Roman beginnings to the Sixteenth Century. The study of Renaissance art and architecture will begin with an over-view of the ideas central to the Classical world and end with the transition to Mannerism. Classroom lectures will be the springboard to the onsite experience of art/architecture in both sacred and secular places. In addition to viewing art in museums and churches, students will be introduced to well- known cultural artifacts that mirrored everyday life in the palazzo as well as the more common Renaissance home. The changing role of the artist in society , the larger themes and purposes of art, the vocabulary of art and the principles of design will be topics of discussion, study and practice. The course is part of a study abroad experience. Living in Florence will provide students with a first- hand knowledge of the Florentine people who created part of the Italian culture. NOTE: Alternate pre-req - Permission of instructor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the importance of the archaeological finds of Fiesole’s Roman Temple, Roman theater, and Roman baths.
Define the terms “classical antiquity”.
Define the term “Renaissance” and articulate exactly what was reborn.
Understand how Renaissance architects were inspired by the “language and principles of classical architecture”.
Trace the impact of classical humanism on Renaissance art, architecture and culture in general.
Understand the struggle between the Guelphs and the Ghibelines and their impact on Florence and Siena.
Explain the evolution of the guild system and its power in Renaissance Florentine politics, and the significance of Or San Michele.
Understand the importance of the precursors of the Renaissance: Cimebue, Sts.
Dominic and Frances, Nicola and Giovanni Pisano, Duccio di Buoninsegna, Dante Alighieri, Giotto, Martini, Lorenzetti, Orcagna, and Andrea da Firenze.
Define the following common terms in architecture and identify them in buildings both sacred/secular: arch, dome, post and lintel, cupola, colonnade, capital, entablature, flutes, shaft, Latin Cross, choir, transept, sacristy, coffered ceiling, side aisles, pendentives, bays, niches, facade, balustrade, cantilever, pilaster, loggia, nave, the Orders, round arch and vault, pointed arch.
Trace the rise of the architect from the cathedral mason/carpenter.
Articulate the importance of Vitruvius and his treatise on architecture.
Recognize the visual elements and the principles of design and be able to use them in a limited written analysis of paintings and sculpture.
Understand the geographical and political framework of the Italian city-states and their competiveness.
Explain the “casiato” as a source of information about artists and their patrons.
Identify major architectural and sculptural achievements in Florence 1400-1460.
Identify major artists and their paintings in Florence 1400-1460.
Identify the major works of Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo and Raphael in the late 15th Century (Florence and Rome).
Demonstrate a basic understanding of Brunelleschi’s perspective system.
Articulate the difference between linear perspective and atmospheric perspective.
Demonstrate a broad understanding of the Renaissance genius as a phenomenon in Renaissance Italy.
Explain basic social, cultural, political and geographical conditions that caused the arts to flourish in Florence.
Understand the chronological/historical development of art in Florence through both a study of theory and repeated encounters with the art on-site or in museums.
Articulate the controversy over the impact of the Black Death on the art that followed it.
Name and identify the 5 Orders of architecture known in the Renaissance.
Understand the term “patronage” and articulate the role of the Medici as patrons of the arts.
Explain how the Renaissance house became an outward symbol of status and wealth through its art and furnishing.
Describe the role of ceramic ware in Renaissance culture.
Explain the role of palace architecture in Renaissance cities.
Recognize a variety of scenes from the life of Jesus Christ.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

HUM 295  Mindfulness Education and Stress Reduction for College Students: The Art of Breathing  

This is an inter-discplinary, co-taught course that offers a systematic approach to stress reduction. It is also designed to help students to learn, study, experience and evaluate the numerous benefits of mindfulness practice, such as enhanced critical thinking, improved academic abilities, conflict resolution, increase in personal effectiveness in dealing with life stressors particular to college students. The course is taught by a team of humanities and nursing faculty and will include mindfulness practices, body work (yoga, Tai Chi, Chi Ghong), scientific/clinical neurobiological data collection and evaluation and research on the connection between body and mind, as well as the historical and philosophical roots of mindulness practice. Particular attention will be paid to teaching to reduce test anxiety, especially for high status testing for professional certification such as PRAXIS and NCLEX. Note: This course is a pilot/special studies course that may or may not transfer. This course cannot be required as a prerequisite course or a progam course. One section of this course will be offered in Fall, 2016, Spring, 2017 and, Fall, 2017

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the nature of mindfulness and describe methods to practice it.
Identify theories of stress reduction.
Research and understand the historical roots and philosophy of mindfulness.
Use bodywork techniques for stress reduction.
Investigate the connections between well-being and mindfulness.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours