Academic Catalog

Music (MUS)

MUS 101  Fundamentals of Music  

This course is designed for the beginning musician, non-music readers and individuals lacking a fundamental understanding of rhythm, notation, clefs, time signatures, key signatures and practical musicianship skills necessary for the study of both instrumental performance and the study of music theory and composition.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and read pitch in G and F clefs.
Discriminate among various rhythmic patterns and notations.
Perform ear training and rhythmic exercises.
Demonstrate basic sight singing skills.
Identify all intervals from seconds to octaves by ear (Major, Minor, Perfect and Tritone).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 110  Music for Children  

Music for Children offers all students an opportunity to explore and experiment with music rudiments, psychology, philosophy, performance and pedagogy. This is a course for students who wish to share their own music experiences with others.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the role music plays in our culture and in the child's educational development.
Identify and relate educational significance to various music activities.
Apply music rudiments to facilitate educational music activities.
Play an autoharp accompaniment while singing.
Select appropriate materials and models of instruction to support educational plans and objectives.
Coordinate several of the above competencies in a single instructional presentation.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 115  Introduction to World Music  

As a selective survey of music, this course is designed to teach students about both traditional and contemporary music from various parts of the world, including Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, central Asia, and the Far East.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate active listening to various styles of non-western music.
Define the characteristics that are unique to each type of music, including instrumentation.
Appreciate the diversity of musical expression in world cultures and how music is experienced within individual cultures.
Understand music making and music appreciation as part of the human experience.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 120  Introduction to Music  

This course is for humanities electives credits. Emphasis is placed on listening, music techniques and design, historic and geographic relationships, and noted personalities.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Characterize general style and techniques expressed through the various stages and periods from 600 AD to the present.
Relate music phases to the attributing aspects of other periods and to the cultural-social attitude and practice of each particular era.
Identify the evolutionary influence of the format and latter 20th-century music styles and techniques found in the American and European cultures.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 121  American Music  

A survey of the evolution of music in the United States from the period of colonization to the present. Themes include European classical influences on the cultural melting pot, and the genre, form and style of concert, folk, pop, jazz and commercial music.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the evolutionary phases of American music as influenced by other cultures and as developed from the 17th century to the present.
Relate the various techniques and styles of American music to the multifaceted characteristics of the social, religious, political, scientific and cultural aspirations of a particular time and a specific American population.
Discriminate among five main evolutionary stages, and identify contributors of each stage.
Recognize the difference among genre, form and style and use each music characteristic in identifying 10 major composers.
Interrelate all past considerations in the evolution and forecasting of current trends of American music and interpret their relationships to the contemporary cultural/social environment.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 122  Reading and Writing Music  

This course is designed for the non-music reader and individuals lacking a comprehensive understanding of rhythm, notation, clefs, time signatures and key signatures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and write in G and F clefs.
Discriminate among various rhythmic patterns and notations.
Develop melodic patterns.
Analyze major and minor modes.
Synthesize and analyze basic triad structures.
Perform in music dictation and ear training.

Prerequisites: MAT 050 or MAT 060. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 123  Jazz: From Blues to ...  

A survey course with emphasis on the various phases and styles of American jazz. Discussions and listenings will include cultural, socio-economic relationships and the evolution of technique and instrumentation.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discriminate among seven specific styles of jazz.
Identify the technical variations of jazz artists and styles.
Describe the contributions of at least 10 noted jazz performers.
Recognize the influences upon and of jazz.
Compare the evolution and role of jazz to other styles of music, both American and worldwide.
Recognize the styles and techniques as they may relate to the cultural aspirations of a people and to the American culture as a whole.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 125  Piano Class I  

Piano Class I is an introductory course in piano-playing techniques. The course is applied and provides facilities for class participation and out-of-class practice. Scales, music reading and the playing of simple folk songs and piano works will be included.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify all keys on the piano and all symbols applicable to basic piano music.
Control various hand positions with left- and right-hand independence.
Perform simple rhythmic designs using upper- and lower-arm coordination and independent finger dexterity.
Demonstrate major and minor scales with appropriate fingering, both hands and parallel motion.
Apply basic harmony as an accompaniment to simple melodies.
Play solo songs and simple piano works.
Sight read simple polyphonic, two-hand piano music.
Perform in an in-class recital.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 126  Piano Class II  

A continuation of Piano Class I. Emphasis is placed on solo and duo playing with appropriately advanced materials and techniques. NOTE: Prerequisites: MUS 125 or permission of instructor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply advanced independent control of both hands including alberti bass, broken chords and arpeggiated chords.
Control a wider range of keyboard use with rapid changes of hand positions.
Play music with chromatic modifications.
Perform complex rhythmic patterns with symmetric and asymmetric accents.
Sight read music applicable to individual skills.
Play solo and duo piano works, including some standard repertoire of Bach, Mozart and others.
Perform in an in-class recital.

Prerequisites: MUS 125.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 127  Survey of American Musical  

In this humanities elective, students study the evolution of musical theater through opera, operetta, minstrel shows and follies to the present. Emphasis is on the interrelationship of both theater and music techniques and styles.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discriminate among several specific phases of musical drama.
Identify the differences between opera and American musicals.
Describe the contributions of at least 10 noted composers and 10 librettists.
Compare the evolutionary stages and roles of the various phases of music drama with the culture, society, economics and politics of each period.
Acknowledge the contributions of noted performers of American musical theater.
Interrelate all past considerations in the evolution of the musical as they may relate to current and future trends in the genre.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 128  Guitar I  

This course teaches the basic skills of guitar playing, including music theory, technique exercises, chord forms and rhythms. Level 1 reading etudes and songs will be assigned for classroom performance. This class is intended for students with little or no previous guitar background.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the fundamentals of guitar technique to the electric or acoustic guitar.
Read music appropriate for the guitar.
Perform technical exercises for left and right hand development.
Apply the concepts of music notation and theory, including chromatic scale, triad and seventh chord formulas, major scale formulas, and triad and seventh chord spellings.
Chart the parameters of musical form as applied to songs.
Play rhythmic accompaniments of traditional and popular songs in diverse styles.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MUS 131  History of Rock and Roll  

This course will survey the different genres of popular music in the United States through the Twentieth Century using an historical approach. Lectures will include listening to and analyzing music examples in relation to the social, technical and historical trends. NOTE: Recommended (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the chronological development of Rock and Roll, its styles, and cultural significance.
Critique musical performances and recordings in various rock styles.
Identify and discuss the role of rock music within its aesthetic, historical and cultural contexts.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours