Academic Catalog

Psychology (PSY)

PSY 130  Personal and Career Development  

This course examines the theoretical and empirical issues related to personal growth and career development. The purpose of this course is to increase self-awareness, understand the career development process, and practice the ability to effect personal change. Emphasis is on self-awareness, personal growth, and career exploration that is examined theoretically and applied to the self and others in a diverse society. Content includes identity development, self-assessment, social influence, self-esteem, mindfulness, career development, and behavior change.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply the psychological theories fundamental to identity (self) development, personality, and behavioral change.
Demonstrate self-awareness by identifying their personality traits, interests, skills, and values.
Identify the factors that contribute to an individual’s career development and apply this knowledge to their own career choices.
Summarize psychological factors that can influence the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle.
Describe how coping strategies, including mindfulness, can be applied to everyday living.
Explain how individual differences and worldview may influence beliefs, values, and interaction with others and vice versa.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Corequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 140  General Psychology  

This course is a one-semester introduction to the basic principles and major theoretical approaches that are used to explain human behavior, with emphasis on understanding and application of such principles and theories as they relate to ourselves and our surroundings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the nature of psychology and describe the methods used by psychologists to study behavior.
Identify the major physiological structures involved in the study of behavior.
Identify the principles of sensation and perception.
Describe current theories of learning and thinking explaining their influence in education, life-span development, and other life situations.
Describe the major trends in explaining human emotion and motivation and how they are assessed.
Identify the major theories of human personality and development.
Evaluate the impact of major trends in analyzing ourselves, interpersonal and social relationships and the origins, classification and treatment of mental disorders.
Explain the relationship among physiology, perception, learning, cognition, motivation, and personality, applying them to understanding life situations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 190  Psychology Internship (1)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

1 Credit

PSY 194  Psychology Internship (2)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

2 Credits

PSY 199  Psychology Internship (3)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 200  Personality Theories  

Emphasis in this course is on the understanding and application of basic concepts of psychodynamic, trait, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic-existential perspectives to personal and interpersonal functioning. Biological influences on personality are also considered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Detail the characteristics of psychodynamic theories.
Describe the Five-Factor and other trait approaches to personality.
Describe behavioral perspectives on personality.
Identify the characteristics of cognitive theories of personality.
Describe humanistic and existential personality views and the basics of positive psychology.
Discuss the role of biological processes in personality development and expression.
Explain how an eclectic blend of several major personality theories can be applied to common life situations and experiences.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 202  Theories of Counseling  

This course is a one-semester introduction to the basic theoretical approaches used in counseling. This course is designed to give students an overview of the different psychological theories used by counselors, therapists and human service professionals. A goal of the course is to allow students with an interest in human services to better understand the options open to both counselors and clients when engaging in the therapeutic process. While the curriculum will not make counselors of the students who complete this course, it will provide a foundation of knowledge about the major theories.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe relevant counseling theories.
Understand various ethical issues in the practice of counseling.
Describe the terminology associated with various theories.
Identify the major contributors associated with various theories.
Explain the assumptions of each theory.
Identify the goals of each theory.
Identify the roles of the therapist and the client within each theory.
Explain the process of therapy for each theory.
Identify the various techniques associated with each theory.
Evaluate the strengths and limitations of each theory.
Describe the characteristics of a multiculturally competent counselor.

Prerequisites: PSY 140 and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 203  Counseling Skills  

This experiential course is a one-semester introduction to the basic skills used in the helping process. The course is designed for individuals pursuing a career in social work, or other related human service fields of study. The focus is on development, synthesis, analysis and demonstration of critical reasoning in the use of the core skills that facilitate effective and culturally responsive helping relationships. This course includes both didactic instruction and the development of basic techniques through frequent, applied counseling skills lab activities and written self reflection assignments.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the knowledge, values and skills of the Social Work or Psychology or Counseling profession at the introductory level and analyze the decisions made for use of certain counseling skills in practice lab activities.
Demonstrate the effective use of basic counseling skills for introductory practice.
Assess self-awareness by personal reflection and self-correction in periodic written personal evaluations showing the development of a professional identity and cultural competency.
Analyze and synthesize multiple sources of knowledge, including: prevention, intervention, theory, cultural competency and evaluation in the applied lab activities.
Demonstrate, in alignment with the NASW or APA or ACA Standards for Cultural Competency, the introductory level knowledge, values and counseling skills necessary to work from a strengths perspective with diverse populations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (PSY 140 or SWO 101) and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 204  Foundations of Addiction  

The main goal of this course is for students to develop knowledge of the nature and complexity of addiction. Emphasis in this course is on developing an understanding of the addiction process utilizing a biopsychosocial perspective. Topics examined include, but are not limited to, addictions to substances, gambling, and other addictive behaviors. Prevention and treatment options will be discussed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological perspectives of addiction.
Describe societal issues associated to addiction.
Explain the physiology of the addiction process.
Identify and describe the major substances and behaviors of abuse.
Explain the techniques involved in the treatment of addiction.
Identify programs that provide prevention services as well as those which provide rehabilitation programs and support services.
Identify populations where addiction is highly prevalent and explain the psychological and sociological factors that may be contributing to this phenomenon.
Identify legal and ethical standards involved in working with clients with addiction.

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or BIO 110 or BIO 150.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 205  Human Sexuality  

Utilizing a biopsychosocial model, this course seeks to foster healthy attitudes toward sexuality by providing knowledge and having discussions about the formation of sexual beliefs and myths, the anatomy and physiology of human sexual systems, the psychological and social aspects of sex and gender roles, love and sexuality, sexual minorities, and the legal aspects of sexuality. (Note: material of a sensitive nature will be discussed in this course).

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and explain the nature of human sexuality as a scientific discipline.
Describe and analyze major theoretical perspectives of human sexuality from biological, behavioral, social, political, and historical perspectives.
Identify and explain different research methods used to examine human sexuality and variations in sexual behavior.
Discuss psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to issues addressing human sexuality, gender, and sexual orientation.
Understand historical and contemporary issues surrounding sexuality in our society.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role of emotions in sexual expression.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 210  Lifespan Human Development  

This course investigates how and why people of diverse backgrounds change over time. It surveys theories, research and controversies of human development from conception to death. It analyzes the physical, cognitive and psycho-social development in ecological contexts from multidisciplinary perspectives. Emphasis is on how to promote well-being and growth, and to overcome developmental challenges throughout life span.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic universal principles underlying human development.
Describe the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of lifespan development.
Explain major theories and methodologies related to lifespan human development.
Describe and analyze major changes across different stages throughout lifespan (prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, aging, and death and dying).
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of lifespan human development in today's global context.
Describe and discuss major crises, disabilities, undesirable developmental outcomes and the historical social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination) on developmental differences.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth for optimal personal development in today's complex society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 215  Industrial Psychology  

The study of organizations and groups from a psychological perspective. The course covers fundamentals of organizational behavior, motivation and reward systems, leadership and organizational change, rumor, resistance to change, management styles and stress as it applies to the workplace. It is designed to meet the special needs of business administration students, as well as business management and psychology majors. It will also prove of great value to anyone contemplating any supervisory or management position, such as in nursing, education, social work and construction technology.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define organizational behavior, list the key elements and understand why it is important to understand the psychological principles affecting the workplace.
Understand and explain a motivational theory that pertains to industrial and organizational psychology.
Understand the nature of organizational communications, including the factors that influence decision making.
Understand the nature of leadership and be able to list at least three leadership skills.
Explain "social environment" conformity.
Understand the power of rumor and how it might be controlled.
Explain the concept of industrial participation by employees including: (1) process, (2) prerequisites, (3) benefits, (4) types, and (5) limitations.
Be familiar with the social problems and ethical issues that cause stress and distress in the workplace.
Know the various responsibilities incumbent upon worker and employer regarding referral and treatment of social problems in industry.
Understand the nature of "change" in the workplace.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and PSY 140. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 220  Abnormal Psychology  

The nature of abnormal behavior, its etiology and classification together with a brief examination of treatment methods are emphasized. Psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic-existential, and socio-cultural perspectives will be considered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and compare ambiguities inherent in the psychological and cultural definitions of abnormality.
Identify and describe major historical and current theoretical perspectives regarding the causation of abnormal behavior and explain how each is regarded in society.
Identify and describe the major mental disorders and summarize the diagnostic criteria for each.
Define and give examples of key terms and research methods used in studying abnormal psychology.
Identify and describe the titles, training, and responsibilities of professionals working in the field of mental health.
List and describe the major treatment methods of mental disorders.
Identify major legal and ethical challenges in which law and abnormal psychology intersect.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 221  Social Psychology  

This course examines theories and research in the study of the social influences on individual behavior. It explores the various ways people think about and relate to one another. Topics include self-concept, persuasion, conformity, and aggression. Emphasis is placed on diversity, social justice issues, and different perspectives on the interaction of person and context.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply psychological theory and research to social issues and problems.
Describe aspects of the self as they relate to social and cultural influences.
Assess the significance of attitudes on perception, moral judgment, prejudice and prosocial behavior.
Depict the impact of violence and aggression on the individual, the group and society.
Cite the ways in which social factors can dictate individual behavior.
Analyze the ways humans relate to one another, including prejudice and discrimination.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 225  Experiences in Diversity  

This course critically examines systems of stratification within the United States. Topics include: race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender and sexual orientation. Study is concentrated on understanding the legal and policy based frameworks which created and perpetuate group-based inequality for various people in the U.S.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the etiology of racist, homophobic, ethnocentric, and sexist ideologies.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation.
Describe the impact of minority and majority status as it pertains to economic, psychological and social experience.
List contradictions between the idea that we all have certain inalienable rights and the reality that certain groups in our society continue to be denied many of those rights.
List contributions of those outside of the "mainstream" and understand how those marginalized "others" started social movements which challenged the US to become more democratic, and inclusive.
Describe the systematic ways that inequality due to race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation are perpetuated and possibly eradicated by society’s social institutions.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 235  Educational Psychology  

This course introduces students to theories, research, and applied topics related to teaching and learning. It studies developmentally appropriate education with learner diversity and multicultural influences. Emphasis is on how to effectively motivate learners through appropriate teaching design, class management and assessment, and how to connect theory to teaching and learning practices in today’s global contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and evaluate major theories and approaches related to cognitive development, teaching and learning.
Analyze and evaluate learners’ physical, cognitive and social-emotional characteristics of development.
Describe and analyze teacher’s role in motivating learners.
Identify and discuss effective instructional design, class management, assessment, and other teaching/learning practices in today’s global contexts.
Identify and analyze social/cultural influences (including discrimination and inequality) on learner distress, and accommodations for students from diverse (such as special needs, poverty, multicultural, multilingual and other) backgrounds.
Apply effective principles to promote self-understanding and personal/career development.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 241  Child Development  

This course examines physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in ecological contexts from conception to adolescence. It surveys various theories and research of child development, and examines social/cultural influences that may shape or compromise normal development and transitions in today's global contexts. Emphasis is on how to promote healthy growth and overcome developmental challenges during this life stage.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the basic principles underlying child development.
Describe and analyze the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of development from prenatal to adolescence.
Describe and explain major theories and research methods of child development.
Identify and evaluate major changes at different stages (prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle and late childhood, adolescence).
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of child development in today's global context.
Describe and analyze social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination) on normal and atypical childhood development and transitions.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth, to promote optimal personal/career development for both individual and family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 242  Adolescent Psychology  

This course examines physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in ecological contexts from puberty to maturity. It surveys various theories and research of adolescent development. It examines social/cultural influences that may shape/compromise development and transitions in today's global contexts. Emphasis is on how to promote healthy growth and overcome developmental challenges during adolescence.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the basic principles underlying adolescent development.
Describe and analyze the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of development from puberty to maturity.
Describe and explain major theories and research methods of adolescent development.
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of adolescent development in today's global context.
Describe and analyze social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination, etc) on adolescent development and transitions.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth, to promote optimal personal/career development for both individual and family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 255  Intro to Biological Psychology  

Biological psychology (sometimes called physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience) is the study of how different systems in the body, primarily the nervous system, coordinate to produce experience and behavior. This course is designed to be an introduction to this interdisciplinary field of study. Topics range from the cellular basis of neuronal activities, the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes and disorders. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behavior to clinical disorders. Successful completion of this course will provide a strong foundation of basic knowledge and methodological competencies in Biological Psychology/Neuroscience required of Psychology majors at 4-year institutions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the structure and function of the nervous system, neuroanatomy, and the divisions of the nervous system.
Analyze the structure and function of neurons, the electrical and chemical communication between neurons, and the major neurotransmitters.
Describe and evaluate the biological and physiological basis of psychological experience and behavior (including sensory and motor experience, motivation, learning and memory, consciousness, reproductive behaviors, psychological disorders and addiction).
Understand developmental changes in the brain and nervous system across the lifespan.
Evaluate the psychological and behavioral consequences of damage to the physiological systems.
Interpret and communicate research findings within the field of biological psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 290  Adulthood and Aging  

This course is an examination of the biological, physical, psychological, cognitive, affective, social and cultural changes that occur as people move from adulthood into old age. It explores the controversies, myths, and realities of growing older in America. As well, the course emphasizes the similarities and differences of adulthood and aging across cultures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic principles underlying development from the adult years through the end of life.
Identify the major physical and biological changes in adult development from adulthood to old age.
Describe the various cognitive changes in adult development, such as those related to memory, intelligence, thinking, and problem solving.
Evaluate the various theoretical explanations of cognitive, affective, socio-cultural and personality development in adult development through old age.
Evaluate the relevance of cross-cultural research findings in adult development and aging.
Examine multiple perspectives on death and dying, considering the individual, family, and culture.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours