Academic Catalog

Sociology (SOC)

SOC 100  Human Relations  

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic principles of sociology with emphasis on human relationships in community and industrial settings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the importance of human relations in the community and occupational spheres.
Interact effectively in the social context.
Describe the significance of self-awareness in building good human relationships.
Distinguish between the formal and informal structures of an organization as they relate to appropriate human relations.
Describe appropriate employee on-the-job behavior, especially during the first few probationary months.
Describe how the impact of human relations in the leadership and motivational areas can affect productivity.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 110  Introduction to Sociology  

This course studies the factors that determine social organization, social injustice, behavior and change as they are considered in relation to the individual student's own life and society. Study is concentrated on social intervention, culture, social class, national and global inequality, institutions and socialization.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the sociological perspective to their own lives.
Further personal development through knowledge and in the socialization process.
Describe the impact of the five major social institutions on society and themselves.
Assess present and possible future effects of social change on their culture's and values.
Depict the effects of living in a modern complex society.
Use the three major sociological theoretical perspectives to analyze a major concept within sociology.
Describe the systematic ways that oppression and privilege are built into and perpetuated by social institutions.
Describe the various ways in which global interdependence impacts the social, economic and political society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 120  Social Problems  

This course studies contemporary social problems from theoretical and practical perspectives. Theoretical assessments of the national and international origins and etiology that support and sustain social injustice, inequality, and conflict will be supported through data sources.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the sociological perspective to the national and international social problems.
Describe the origin, development, and society's possible treatment of at least two contemporary and social problems detailing how the rules of society and its social institutions attempt to sustain, perpetuate and/or eradicate inequity and injustice.
Describe the systematic ways that oppression is facilitated by powerful people and society's social institutions.
Describe the various ways in which global interdependence impacts the people in society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 131  Sport, Culture and Society  

Sports are cultural phenomena encompassing many facets of social life. Sports, Culture, and Society is designed to analyze society’s engagement in competitive sports as spectators. The course will explore the role of sports in society and the various types of social responses to the culture of sports. Topics that will be analyzed include media and sports, social inequality and sports, youth and sports, education and sports, gender and sports, politics and sports, violence in sports, and ethics in sports. The course will focus upon current events in the American culture that influence how people in society respond to sports.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand how and why sports have been created and organized in particular ways.
Articulate the ways that social, political and economic factors influence the growth, popularity and visibility of sports in society.
Describe the role sports play in school activities for youth.
List ways in which the media depict sports relative to gender.
Describe the positive and negative outcomes of participation in sports on group engagement and social growth.
Describe the manners in which sports motivate aggressive and violent behavior in society.
Understand the social processes that occur in connection with sports (competition, conflict, socialization, group cooperation).
Evaluate how sports have an impact on people's thoughts about their bodies and about gender, race/ethnicity, social class and disability.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 180  Marriage and The Family  

This course explores various types of family relationships in society and how sustaining and changing the values, beliefs and rules in relationships are supported and altered through society's institutions in diverse societies.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the American family in terms of the three major sociological theories.
Explain the concepts concerning who marries whom.
Describe how the rules in institutions shape perceptions of what constitutes a family and may reinforce inequality and discrimination.
Explain human reproduction, including prenatal aspects, childbirth, contraceptive techniques and socially transmitted diseases.
Assess possible future changes in what family forms, marriage forms and living arrangements are as they may affect the American family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 210  Cultural Anthropology  

The societal and individualistic characteristics of culture are explored by examining and comparing several cultures. The evolution of community living from hunting and gathering societies to contemporary urban and suburban and there effects of individual behavior are explored.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the cultural anthropological perspective to his/her own life.
Demonstrate usage of the fundamental principles involved in the study of culture to daily living.
Explain various types of "world views" as found in different cultures.
Describe the impact of the cultural environment upon the student's personality.
Assess the effects of cultural change upon the student's own and his/her culture's fundamental values.
Describe the systematic ways that social institutions may inhibit cultural change and reinforce inequality.
Describe global interdependence from a "world view" and how it impacts various cultures and societies.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 215  Experiences in Diversity  

This course critically examines systems of stratification within the United States. Topics include: race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender and sexual orientation. Study is concentrated on understanding the legal and policy based frameworks which created and perpetuate group-based inequality for various people in the U.S.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the etiology of racist, homophobic, ethnocentric, and sexist ideologies.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation.
Describe the impact of minority and majority status as it pertains to economic, psychological and social experience.
List contradictions between the idea that we all have certain inalienable rights and the reality that certain groups in our society continue to be denied many of those rights.
List contributions of those outside of the "mainstream" and understand how those marginalized "others" started social movements which challenged the US to become more democratic, and inclusive.
Describe the systematic ways that inequality due to race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation are perpetuated and possibly eradicated by society's social institutions.

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 219  The Sociology of Race And Immigration  

In this class we will scrutinize the Eurocentric construction of race, delving into how it was used as a central organizing principle in North American society. We will also explore racism as an ideology, and how it was and is used to create, promote and perpetuate racial inequality. In focusing on racism, we will discuss social policies which promote (d) and protect(ed) white wealth, while at the same time denying people of color access to opportunity and resources. In this context we will discuss white privilege, color-blindness, and affirmative action policies. In addition, we will research the immigration debate. In order to do this, we will work on defining the catch-all term “diversity, and then examine (1) immigration to the USA, paying close attention to the manner in which various group experiences were (and are) similar to, and different from, one another; (2) theories of integration; and (3) the multiculturalism debate. Furthermore, we will examine the “other” from the viewpoint of those marginalized in society. Therefore, we will explore the relationship between the dominant - hegemonic - culture, and sub-cultural beliefs, attitudes, challenges, and attempts to redefine group status. This means we will focus upon power relationships and the dynamics of group attempts to access power, and how social movements have shaped and transformed U.S. social fabric. This class will be both historical in nature and present-day oriented. We will take the time to study the past because without such knowledge we can neither understand nor examine the current system of racial domination. Such inquiry will help shed light on how historical circumstances continue to impact and shape current racialized identities and disparities. A field trip may be required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the social construction of racial and ethnic categories.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race, ethnicity, racism and racial stratification.
List the racial contradictions inherent in US society, and different strategies toward resolving them.
Describe various immigrant experiences in the US using macro theories of integration.
Analyze public policies and laws which shape group identity and social movements.
Present ideas clearly in a formal and professional manner.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 215 or PSY 225.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 220  Social Psychology  

This course examines theories and research in the study of the social influences on individual behavior. It explores the various ways people think about and relate to one another. Topics include self-concept, persuasion, conformity, and aggression. Emphasis is placed on diversity, social justice issues, and different perspectives on the interaction of person and context.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply psychological theory and research to social issues and problems.
Describe aspects of the self as they relate to social and cultural influences.
Assess the significance of attitudes on perception, moral judgment, prejudice and prosocial behavior.
Depict the impact of violence and aggression on the individual, the group and society.
Cite the ways in which social factors can dictate individual behavior.
Analyze the ways humans relate to one another, including prejudice and discrimination.

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 240  Human Geography  

This class will look at how places and regions are interconnected, how they are unique, and how people, ideas, and things moving from one locale to another can change a place or region. After taking this class, students will view their surroundings in new ways by asking questions like: Why are peoples, cultures, and places what they are? Why are they where they are? How can geography help me understand today's changing world?

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define and describe the role of geography as an academic discipline its relation to other subjects, and career possibilities.
Explain the major course themes of globalization and cultural diversity, and how they relate to the various course topics.
Describe the major concepts and principles concerning our human relationship to, and use of, the earth's environment from an historical perspective.
Describe the major aspects of population growth and migration (both internal and international) and list the consequences of continued growth.
Describe the major geographical themes as applied to aspects of human culture such as language, music, religion, and social customs.
Describe the major world agricultural systems.
Describe the primary geographical aspects of economic development, the ways in which it varies, and the ways that countries can promote development.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 260  Research Methodology  

This course investigates and analyzes both quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It is designed to give students the skills to examine social science issues through creating and utilizing empirical research. Study is concentrated on experimentation, types of research sources, survey construction and field participation. Research papers are required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the scientific method and its assumptions as a way of knowing and why it is used in research.
Explain the relationship between theory and research.
Apply the steps in the research design and distinguish between correlational designs.
Describe and distinguish the difference between independent and dependent variables and techniques of experimental control.
Create a literature review on a relevant social science topic.
Detail the process of creating a hypothesis and question for examination through research.
Describe index and scales construction.
Explain the differences between quantitative and qualitative research including correlation, association and causation.
Describe the meaning of validity and reliability in research while demonstrating an understanding of construct, internal and external validity and the threats to validity.
Explain the importance of the IRB and ethics in research.
Explain the difference between random and systematic error.
Apply methods to measure causal and/or associative changes in a dependent variable.
Describe the difference between primary and secondary data.
Describe the experimental and quasi-experimental design.
Explain single IV, factorial and single case designs.
Conduct mock interview and debriefing.
Describe the purpose of a research proposal and write a sample proposal in APA research format.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Literacy (IL)

Prerequisites: (MAT 050 or MAT 060 or MAT 100 or MAT 110 or MAT 111 or MAT 120 or MAT 121 or MAT 125 or MAT 126 or MAT 128 or MAT 135 or MAT 136 or MAT 140 or MAT 141 or MAT 150 or MAT 151 or MAT 152 or MAT 160 or MAT 161 or MAT 200 or MAT 210 or MAT 230 or MAT 260 or MAT 261) and ENG 100 and (SOC 100 or SOC 110 or SOC 120 or SOC 131 or SOC 180 or SOC 210 or SOC 215 or SOC 219 or SOC 220 or SOC 240 or PSY 130 or PSY 140 or PSY 200 or PSY 202 or PSY 203 or PSY 204 or PSY 205 or PSY 210 or PSY 215 or PSY 220 or PSY 221 or PSY 225 or PSY 235 or PSY 241 or PSY 242 or PSY 290).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours