Academic Catalog

Communication Arts

The College Transfer Office is set up to help Delaware County Community College students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. If you are planning to transfer, you are strongly encouraged to meet with a transfer advisor within your first two semesters (or before you reach 30 transferable college credits from all institutions attended).

Associate in Arts (AA) Degrees

Communication Arts (COMM)

The Communication Arts major at Delaware County Community College blends the theoretical with the practical by providing students with a foundation in the study of human communication that prepares them to continue academic study in the field. In particular, students select specialized programs and related electives by choosing one of three degree program options:  Communication Studies, Journalism, or Theatre. When selecting a Communication Arts program option, including courses and electives, the student should consult four-year transfer institution requirements.

The Communication Studies option is designed for students who wish to continue academic study in human communication including, but not limited to, interpersonal, intercultural, public speaking and media studies.

Communication Arts, Journalism Option (JOUR)

The Communication Arts major at Delaware County Community College blends the theoretical with the practical by providing students with a foundation in the study of human communication that prepares them to continue academic study in the field. In particular, students select specialized programs and related electives by choosing one of three degree program options:  Communication Studies, Journalism, or Theatre. When selecting a Communication Arts program option, including courses and electives, the student should consult four-year transfer institution requirements.

The Journalism option is designed for students who wish to continue academic study in journalism, public relations and/or mass communication. Students contemplating a career in print media, electronic media, photojournalism, or public relations should select this program.

Communication Arts - Theater Option (THEA)

The Communication Arts major at Delaware County Community College blends the theoretical with the practical by providing students with a foundation in the study of human communication that prepares them to continue academic study in the field. In particular, students select specialized programs and related electives by choosing one of three degree program options: Communication Studies, Journalism, or Theatre. When selecting a Communication Arts program option, including courses and electives, the student should consult four-year transfer institution requirements.

The Theatre option is designed for students who wish to continue academic study in theatre, acting (for stage or film), directing and/or technical theatre (lights, sound, set construction, etc.). Students who wish to continue to a four-year degree in theatre or performance art should choose this option.

DCCC production of A Midsummer Night's Dream

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Theater Arts, Certificate of Competency (THEC)

The Certificate of Competency in Theatre Arts is designed for students who wish to have sufficient theatre training to be able to pursue a career in the theatre, or who wish to apply for certain graduate level theatre training programs which accept students without a B.A. All Theatre Arts courses are transferable for those students who wish to pursue a B.A. in Theatre or Communication Arts. In the Theatre Arts Certificate of Competency program, students are given a strong background in a broad range of theatre skills, including acting, set construction and design, lighting design, costume and make-up design and theatre history. Students may then choose from elective courses in Theatre Arts to complete the requirements for the Certificate of Competency.

View full A-Z Course List

COMM - Communication Studies

COMM 100  Interpersonal Communication  

This course focuses on the theory and the practice of human communication with an emphasis on one-on-one (dyadic) communication in diverse relationships and various contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish between interpersonal communication and other types of human communication.
Describe the individual, cultural, and social factors that affect interpersonal communication.
Explain the interconnectedness of communication and culture within interpersonal relationships.
Explain the role of verbal and nonverbal expression in interpersonal relationships.
Explain the role of technology in interpersonal communication.
Describe the role of interpersonal communication in developing, negotiating, maintaining, and terminating relationships.
Identify listening styles and barriers to active listening.
Identify the consequences of different conflict management behaviors.
Describe the ethical responsibilities of a communicator.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Oral Communication (OC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 102  Communication Across Cultures  

This course focuses on communication among and between people of different cultures. It is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts, theories, and research pertaining to intercultural communication. Students can also expect to engage in in-class exercises, activities, and discussions regarding everyday encounters with people from different socio-economic (class) backgrounds, racial, ethnicities, sexual orientations, gender, physical abilities and religious belief systems.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the interconnectedness of communication and culture.
Demonstrate a self-awareness and an understanding of others' cultural values, beliefs, and communication styles.
Describe the influence of culture on one's identity formation and identity management.
Explain the role of language in perception and culture.
Describe the characteristics of intercultural conflict and culturally-based conflict styles.
Explain the cultural value orientation patterns held by different cultures.
Analyze the way the history (eg, political, intellectual, social, family, national, and cultural-group) informs an intercultural communication encounter.
Describe cultural shock and the various academic approaches to understanding it.

Prerequisites: COMM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 104  Introduction to Mass Communication  

This course introduces students to the industrialized production, distribution, regulation, consumption and analysis of print, electronic and new media industries. Students will review the history of mass communication in the media industries and explore career options in this field. They will also study the interrelated nature of media and society.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the origins of the media industries.
Analyze the impact of print, electronic and new media upon society.
Explain the changing nature of the media industries in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
Explain the convergence of media forms.
Assess the various mass communication career opportunities in the media industries.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 105  Small Group Communication  

A study of the techniques involved in effective group communication including: discussion, decision making, problem solving and resolving conflict in groups. Students learn theories of group dynamics and the nature of norms, goals, roles and leadership styles in small, task oriented groups. The class is a laboratory where students actively participate in structured group experiences requiring preparation and evaluation.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the dynamics of effective group communication needed to maintain a small group.
Identify and manage interpersonal conflicts in group settings.
Recognize and identify differences in culture and communication styles as they apply to small group communication.
Distinguish between defensive and supportive group communication climates.
Recognize each of the following as they apply to small group communication: role, individual goal, group goal, norm, group cohesion, and feedback.
Explain the principles necessary to lead a discussion or group meeting.
Participate productively in small group contexts.

Prerequisites: COMM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 106  New Media and Culture  

This course introduces students to theories, industrial trends and consumer practices related to digital media. Topics will include media convergence, media literacy, and cultural criticism in the digital age as well as audience/fan studies. Upon completion of this course, students will gain a foundational knowledge of recent scholarly work related to the field of media studies.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain contemporary digital media industries.
Describe mediated consumer practices.
Apply media theories to the study of digital and new media technologiesExplain the role media literacy and critical consumption plays in a democratic society.
Explain the influence digital media platforms and computer-mediated communication has on culture.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 111  Public Speaking  

This course enables students to deliver a variety of presentations. Students are introduced to various methods of delivery, organizational patterns, and types of presentational aids. Emphasis is placed on preparing presentations for multiple audiences and occasions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize appropriate techniques for managing communication apprehension.
Construct and deliver a variety of presentations.
Construct and use appropriately designed visual aids.
Locate and effectively incorporate supporting material drawn from a variety of sources.
Organize content in a logical manner according to presentation type.
Deliver a presentation employing effective stylistic techniques.
Demonstrate effective listening skills as both a speaker and a listener of presentations.
Demonstrate ethical responsibilities of a speaker.
Adapt presentation message to audience and occasion

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Oral Communication (OC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 115  Introduction to Public Relations  

This course treats public relations as communication-the process of organizations relating to their various "publics." Students explore the theory, principles and techniques of contemporary public relations as practiced in business, government, nonprofit and civic groups, cultural organizations, education and the community. Students prepare press releases, public service announcements, speeches, slide programs or other appropriate communication vehicles. For students in all curricula and programs.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe public relations as a communication function of organizations.
List 10 basic principles of effective public relations.
Identify and describe career opportunities/possibilities within the student's field of study, interests or aptitude area in public relations.
Cite examples from the American past of public relations campaigns or principles that changed a "public's" view of an organization, a movement, an institution or a tradition.
Anticipate and analyze critical and negative views of public relations.
Identify the use of communicative art forms such as music, poetry, art, dance, film or story telling, in any public relations campaign mounted by a significant American organization.
Use, where appropriate, contemporary technology such as desktop publishing or computer software or slide and sound show or photography or student-produced video in designing a public relations campaign on a contemporary American problem, organization or movement.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 190  Communications Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit

COMM 194  Communications Internship (2 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

2 Credits

COMM 199  Communications Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits

COMM 200  Argumentation and Debate  

To survive, compete, thrive and find success in an often-turbulent modern world requires a sound working knowledge of the rules of persuasion and the ability to use the tools of verbal reasoning, logic and evidence to support one's position.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate that he/she/they can effect change through the use of persuasive skill.
Debate both the affirmative and the negative positions of a current controversial proposition.
Prepare a "brief" showing the supportable positions on any contemporary social, political or economic question.
Use the principles of library research and nonprint media to support their persuasive position.

Prerequisites: COMM 111.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

COMM 201  Communication Theory  

This course examines the major paradigms within the study of human communication by introducing students to both historical and contemporary communication theories from various branches of the discipline. Students will evaluate and apply the theories in and across a variety of contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define theory.
Demonstrate an understanding of theory/model development.
Distinguish between the major paradigms within the communication discipline.
Identify key branches of study within the communication discipline.
Apply major communication theories.
Critique communication theories by identifying constructs and limitations.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

DRA - Drama

DRA 100  Introduction to Theatre  

This course surveys the world's dramatic literature by concentrating on text analysis of a representative sample of plays of varying periods (ancient, classical, modern) and types (tragedy, comedy, drama). Emphasis is placed on the plays in performance. Field trips to theatrical productions may be scheduled. This is not an acting course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify through the development of theatre the social, cultural, economic, religious and political forces that have shaped the student's world.
Identify positive values through attending plays that will broaden and enrich the student's life.
Develop and expand the student's sensory perception through the critical reading of play texts.
Write and present oral critiques of plays seen and studied, using standards of drama criticism that enlarge the student's appreciation of the art form.
Apply theatre attendance in life as a continuing educational experience that enhances career aspirations and broadens cultural perspective.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

DRA 105  Acting Shakespeare  

Acting Shakespeare is designed with the knowledge that the plays of Shakespeare were written to be spoken aloud, by actors on a stage. This course will investigate the plays of Shakespeare with that reality in mind, and introduce students to the myriad techniques Shakespeare used in his writing which assist the actor in the performance of his characters and the onstage telling of his stories. Acting and performance techniques from Shakespeare's day to the present will be explored through vocal and movement exercises. Students are required to read several Shakespearean plays and to analyze the texts with the goal of performing monologues and scenes from those plays. Plays in performance will be emphasized and students will watch filmed stage productions. Students will be required to see a live theatrical production of a Shakespearean play when possible.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate, through text analysis and performance, an understanding of the fundamentals of Shakespeare's verse and prose and how these relate to the acting of those texts.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of acting techniques which have been applied to the works of Shakespeare throughout history.
Bring to life one of Shakespeare's characters from the plays, both physically and psychologically, and be able to communicate that character's needs and intentions through performance.
Effectively use vocal techniques to bring Shakespeare's words, rhythms, and imagery to life.
Work within a group and show an awareness of ensemble dynamics and cooperation.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

DRA 110  Acting I  

This acting course is designed to provide students with the basic rudiments of acting. Emphasis is on movement, breathing, voice (diction, projection, emphasis, interpretation), and script and character analysis. Students are required to read several plays and to attend at least two performances at area theaters. The hour TBA is provided for rehearsals. Theatre majors are encouraged to take DRA 100 in conjunction with this course as it provides insight into script analysis and staging practices. NOTE: Prerequisites: DRA 110 or comparable experience.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the procedure for bringing a written script to performance.
Demonstrate basic voice and movement techniques.
Evaluate acting techniques.
Recognize the various components of an artistic endeavor, including the roles of self-discipline, motivation, flexibility, cooperation and creativity.
Perform short monologues and dialogues.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

DRA 111  Acting II  

Acting II is a continuation of Acting I. In this course, students refine skills they developed in Acting I and continue to explore the acting process through readings, theatre attendance and performance work. Emphasis is on character development through improvisation, script analysis, movement and scene projects. Students also examine the role of imagination, perception and creativity in acting.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify period acting styles.
Demonstrate physical and aesthetic awareness of acting techniques.
Demonstrate an understanding of character interpretation through movement and voice control.
Work effectively with others on acting projects.
Demonstrate imaginative and creative talents through the actualization of theoretical concepts of acting.

Prerequisites: DRA 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

DRA 114  Theatre Arts Practicum  

This course is designed to give students practical experience in theatrical production of a play. Students can choose to work as actors, production crew members, or costume and wardrobe crew members in producing a play at Delaware County Community College. The play will be performed for paying audiences. This course gives students hands on experience in preparation for entering a career in Theatre and allows students to realize the intense collaborative nature of the Theatre.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Work within a group and demonstrate an awareness of ensemble dynamics and cooperation.
Demonstrate knowledge of the various production elements needed to produce Theatre.
Safely operate tools and equipment used in the construction of sets, costumes and lighting design.
Demonstrate a responsible work ethic and an understanding of working within a highly diverse group of artists.

1 Credit

DRA 116  Stagecraft  

This is a workshop course; you will learn by doing. Students have the opportunity to learn how to paint scenic efforts, design stage lighting and sound, and construct basic set pieces and architectural details. Students will also learn the basics of costume and makeup design and apply those basic concepts, creating costumes and applying makeup designs such as corrective makeup and old-age. Students must attend all rehearsals and performances where they will serve as members of the stage crew or the lighting and sound crew. Students can expect to work a considerable number of hours outside the normal classroom meeting time.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Design a simple stage set.
Design basic stage lighting.
Use basic carpenter's tools safely and with precision.
Paint simple scenic efforts, such as rocks, wood, texture, etc.
Orchestrate the movements of a stage crew to efficiently remove and erect stage sets before during and after performances.
Operate a basic lighting control board and sound equipment on cue.
Apply basic and old-age makeup.
Apply scars and bruises using makeup techniques learned in class.
Demonstrate knowledge of period makeup, hair, and costumes.
Design costumes for a specific play from concept to final design.
Create makeup and hair design for specific play.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

DRA 130  Voice and Movement  

Voice and Movement is designed to introduce students to major vocal and movement techniques and practices used by professionals such as actors to maximize their effectiveness as public speakers and to create vibrant, multi-faceted characters for stage and film. This course teaches the inner workings of the human voice and the processes of articulation used to speak and pronounce sounds, and will emphasize the effective use of such techniques as proper breathing, stress, inflection, vocal quality, focus, rate of speech and pace, and others. Students will also learn various movement techniques such as gesture, mime, Alexander technique, Viewpoints, and the Suzuki method. The class will investigate the body/voice connection, and how these techniques work together in public speaking and in the creation of a stage or film character.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the physical actions and anatomical parts of the body used to produce sound and speech.
Demonstrate in performance a knowledge of the different styles and methods of physical movement used in the art of speaking and acting.
Apply tools and concepts learned to create an effective public speaking voice.
Analyze a script or speech to identify rhetorical devices and rhythms of speech.
Create a physical and vocal description of a theatrical character based on analysis of a script.
Apply methods and techniques learned to manipulate the voice and physicality of the body in the creation and performance of a theatrical character.
Work within a group and demonstrate an awareness of ensemble dynamics and cooperation.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG - English

ENG 130  Fundamentals of Journalism I  

This is a writing-intensive course designed for students contemplating a career in journalism. The course will focus on the principles and techniques of journalism with an emphasis on the print media, primarily weekly and daily newspapers. Topics include the nature of news, news gathering techniques, news reporting, digital journalism, ethics of journalism and journalism law.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define "news".
Discuss the impact of electronic media on print media.
Explain the organization and hierarchy of a typical newspaper.
Define newspaper terms.
Interview sources.
Write a lead.
Write news and feature copy according to AP Style.
Create a blog.
Explain journalism law with respect to libel and invasion of privacy.
Identify and summarize three ethical philosophies pertaining to journalism.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 131  Fundamentals of Journalism II  

This writing intensive course is designed for students contemplating a career in journalism, public relations or advertising. Students will continue to practice news gathering and writing techniques learned in Fundamentals of Journalism I (ENG130) as well as techniques in copy editing. While doing so, students will assist in the writing, editing and production of the campus newspaper. Students will also learn to write copy for public relations, advertising and broadcast media.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Write and edit news and feature stories according to AP Style.
Edit news and feature stories using copy-editing symbols.
Submit articles electronically to an editor.
Write broadcast copy.
Write advertising copy.
Write a news release.
Create a press kit for a public relations event.

Prerequisites: ENG 130.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 205  Creative Writing: Introduction  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine and create various elements of prose and poetry. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help move them from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; over the course of the semester, students will read, analyze and critique classmates’ submissions, a process which will help yield more effective works of prose and poetry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the elements necessary to build effective works of poetry and prose.
Create prose that demonstrates the ability to establish developed character that can move through a narrative structure.
Craft poetry that effectively employs sound, imagery and structure.
Examine and evaluate prose and poetry to create a body of polished work that demonstrates knowledge of the effectual elements of each genre.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic poetry and prose.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 206  Creative Writing: Non-Fiction and Memoirs  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of nonfiction. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; students will read, analyze and critique classmates' submissions. In addition to writing their own works, students will read a wide range of published nonfiction and should have a basic understanding of the various modes within the genre.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and discuss the work of important nonfiction texts in terms of structure, dramatic arc, central metaphors and symbols, physicality, and dialogue.
Describe the different types of creative nonfiction: personal essay, memoir, travel writing, profile/biography, feature article/literacy journalism, food writing, etc.
Gather research for a nonfiction piece.
Create nonfiction pieces that include narrative, scene development, character development, dialogue, description, and reflection.
Compose drafts and develop a revision plan.
Share work with fellow writers with a intent of considering feedback and potentially incorporating the ideas of others.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 207  Creative Writing: An Introduction to Playwriting  

This course introduces students to the concepts of dramatic writing, with an emphasis on character and structure. The course is intended to provide the student with practical experience in the creative process of composing stage-worthy plays.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and discuss the work of important playwrights in terms of structure, dramatic arc, central metaphors and symbols, physicality, and dialogue.
Describe the standard format of play.
Research ideas for use in plays.
Formulate different dramatic ideas.
Create dialogue, characters, and relationships intended for the stage.
Compose and revise plays.
Share work with fellow writers with the intent of listening to feedback and potentially incorporating the ideas of others into the work.
Work with actors to refine dialogue.
Use physical-mental exercises to inspire and sustain dramatic writing.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 208  Creative Writing II - Short Story  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of fiction. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; each week, students will read, analyze and critique classmates’ submissions—a process which will help yield vivid characters, compelling scenes and sustained conflict.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the elements necessary to build effective works of fiction, including: characterization, narration, setting, scene, plot, theme and conflict.
Create works of fiction that demonstrate the ability to lead characters through a cohesive narrative structure.
Analyze and evaluate prose in order to discern the literary elements which produce the most success in prose.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic and effectual works of fiction.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 209  Creative Writing: Poetry  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of poetry. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; students will read, analyze and critique classmates' submissions - a process which will help yield proficiency and understanding of form, vivid imagery, and compelling use of language and wordplay.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize and understand the elements necessary to build effective poems, including; music and sound, figurative language, persona and voice, imagery, theme and tone.
Create poems that demonstrate the ability to purposefully utilize language in a cohesive lyric or narrative structure.
Analyze and evaluate poetic techniques and elements in order to discern which produce the most successful verse in a given context or purpose.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic and effectual poetic works.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 222  Introduction to Shakespeare  

This course is a study of representative Shakespearean plays set against the literary, political and social setting that spawned them. Attention is paid to Shakespeare's influence not only in the development of the drama, but also in the literary tradition of the English-speaking world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the particular types of plays and poetic verse of Shakespeare.
Reconstruct the text of Shakespeare's plays in order to view them as dramatic productions.
Examine how literary elements function within Shakespeare's work.
Read and comprehend Shakespeare's language.
Analyze Shakespeare's writings as products of the Renaissance cultural climate.
Recognize the correlations between historical context and literary sources in Shakespeare's work.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours