Academic Catalog

Hospitality

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degrees

Culinary Arts (CUL)

The Culinary Arts, A.A.S. program prepares students for employment in various segments of the foodservice industry in positions such as restaurant chef, banquet chef, sous chef, kitchen manager, production cook, line cook and prep cook. The program includes academic courses, skills development in kitchen lab courses and practical internship experience.

Hotel and Restaurant Management (HRM)

The Hotel/Restaurant Management (HRM) program is designed for individuals seeking specialized training and knowledge as preparation for a career in the vast hospitality industry. The successful graduate can enter the industry at a supervisory level and perform management functions and duties to this industry.

Career fields within hospitality include:

  • Hotel Accounting
  • Food Cost Control
  • Airline Food Operations
  • Catering & Event Planning
  • Convention Operations
  • Cruise Line Food Service
  • Quick Service Supervision (fast food)
  • Food and Beverage Broker
  • Gaming & Casino Food Operations
  • Hotel Housekeeping Supervision
  • Bar Operations
  • Restaurant  Sales
  • Country Club Supervisor
  • Sporting Venue Food Service
  • Theme Park Operations
  • Restaurant Supervisor

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Culinary Arts, Certificate of Competency (CULC)

The Culinary Arts Certificate of Competency prepares students for employment in various segments of the foodservice industry in positions such as restaurant chef, banquet chef, sous chef, kitchen manager, production cook, line cook and prep cook. The certificate includes courses providing skill development in kitchen lab courses and is designed for a student who either wants to enter the field of Culinary Arts or pursue the Culinary Arts Associate in Applied Science Degree.

View full A-Z Course List

CUL - Culinary Arts

CUL 115  Professional Cooking I  

Students will be introduced to the use and care of professional foodservice equipment, basic knife skills, basic cooking methods, weighing and measuring, culinary terminology and applying kitchen sanitation and safety. Students will practice hands-on development of these skills in a professional kitchen.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the safe and proper use and care of commercial foodservice equipment.
Demonstrate safe kitchen work habits and safe food handling.
Demonstrate a proficiency in basic knife skills.
Demonstrate a proficiency in accurate weighing and measuring of wet and dry food ingredients.
Demonstrate a proficiency in production of stocks and leading sauces.
Demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of basic cooking techniques.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of basic culinary terminology.
Demonstrate the ability to identify various food products.

Prerequisites: MAT 040 or MAT 050. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

CUL 150  Baking and Pastry Foundations I  

Students are introduced to the principles of baking, and to the skills and techniques needed for production of baked goods and pastries for commercial foodservice. Topics include planning, selecting ingredients, scaling, mixing, baking, assembling, and decorating. Students will practice hands-on development of these skills in a professional kitchen.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of basic baking techniques.
Demonstrate an understanding of the science of ingredient interaction in baking.
Demonstrate a proficiency in accurate weighing and measuring (scaling) of wet and dry ingredients.
Demonstrate a proficiency in proper mixing of ingredients.
Demonstrate a proficiency in basic baking skills.
Demonstrate a proficiency in production of various baked goods.
Demonstrate the ability to assemble and decorate a variety of baked goods and pastries.

Prerequisites: MAT 040 or MAT 050. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

CUL 151  Baking and Pastry Foundations II  

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of Pastry Design and Plated Desserts. Students lean the basic and advance methods that enable them to produce components for plated desserts, garnishes, and buffet presentations. Students will be introduced to the basic and advanced processes of creating four star desserts. Students will learn the art of creating classical desserts, sauces, pulled candy and sugar work as well as holiday/multi-cultural confections.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding and use of baking fundamentals to create dessert buffet items.
Design and execute a dessert buffet presentation.
Demonstrate an understanding of the use of chocolate in candy and garnish production.
Prepare restaurant desserts such as Creme Brulee, Ice Cream, Souffles and frozen desserts.
Design and execute components for plated dessert presentations.
Calculate costing and yield of plated desserts.
Demonstrate the proper use of commercial baking equipment.
Prepare classical desserts and sauces.

Prerequisites: CUL 150.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

CUL 199  Culinary Externship  

Externship and/or Experiential Learning will provide an opportunity for Culinary Arts students, who have demonstrated a proficiency with basic skills to gain practical field experience. This field experience will allow the students to apply their acquired skills and develop greater proficiency in a real world situation. Students participating in this 180 hour experience will also earn 3 college credits for this experience.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to apply kitchen safety and sanitation concepts learned in HRM.
Demonstrate the ability to perform in a professional setting in a professional manner with regard to attendance, punctuation, teamwork, attitude, production volume and quality, and ability to meet prescribed deadlines.
Demonstrate the ability to maintain a journal of their work experience including a log of duties performed, skills demonstrated, special project assignments, challenges encountered, supervisor reviews and self-reflections.
Demonstrate the ability to apply basic cooking skills learned in CUL 115 / CUL 230 or CUL 150 / CUL 151.
For Cooking Assignments (CUL 115 / CUL 230)- Proper use of commercial food service equipment, safe kitchen work habits, safe food handling, proficiency in knife skills and the use of kitchen tools, proficiency in weights, measures and recipe conversions.
For Baking Assignments (CUL 150 / CUL 151) Proper application of baking techniques, proficiency in proper mixing of ingredients, proficiency in production to various baked goods, proficiency in the use of kitchen tools, proficiency in weights, measures and recipe conversions.

Prerequisites: HRM 110 and ((CUL 115 and CUL 230) or (CUL 150 and CUL 151)).

3 Credits

CUL 210  Foodservice Purchasing  

This course provides an overview of the process of selection and procurement used in various foodservice operations. Main topics include: distribution systems; purchasing goals and options; financial considerations; receiving, storage and issuing of food and non-food products.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of effective purchasing.
Demonstrate knowledge of various purchasing options available in food service.
Exhibit the ability to develop product specifications.
Demonstrate the ability to determine appropriate purchase amounts.
Demonstrate an understanding of the financial responsibilities of a purchaser.
Identify the key strategies for directing the purchasing function.
Identify the elements representing value in purchasing.
Identify various selection factors when purchasing food and non-food items.

Prerequisites: MAT 040 or MAT 050. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

CUL 215  Menu Planning and Cost Control  

This course will present the menu as a vital management tool that influences all foodservice functions. It also presents various strategies for controlling costs with techniques for developing menu content, menu design and pricing.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the history of foodservice and the development of various cuisines.
Demonstrate an understanding of modern foodservice and how it meets current market demands.
Exhibit the ability to plan and produce various types of menus, for commercial and non-commercial operations, to meet established criteria.
Demonstrate the ability to follow strategies for effective cost control and profitabilityIdentify the key aspects of menu design and the importance of the menu as a merchandising tool.
Demonstrate an understanding of various methods of menu analysis and exhibit the ability to use resulting data.

Prerequisites: MAT 040 or MAT 050. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

CUL 220  Nutrition and the Hospitality Industry  

This course is designed for the student preparing for a career in the hospitality industry The student will learn the basic concepts of nutrition and understand how to apply them when designing menus for a variety of consumers. The student will also become familiar with proper food safety as well as state and federal nutrition-related regulations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of basic nutrition and nourishment concepts.
Define vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats and carbohydrates.
Demonstrate an understanding of current public health dietary issues, including identification of the underlying causes and possible solutions.
Demonstrate the application of current FDA dietary guidelines when developing a menu.
Define and demonstrate an understanding of the concept of exchange lists.
Correctly identify the current trends and issues affecting food selection and menu planning for good nutrition practices.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 050. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

CUL 230  Professional Cooking II  

Students will practice and apply the skills and techniques learned in CUL 115 (Professional Cooking I) to the production of soups and compound sauces, meat and seafood fabrication, food preparation for commercial foodservice, basic garde manger production, plating and garnishing. Students will practice hands-on development of these skills in a professional kitchen.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the production of compound sauces and soups.
Demonstrate meat, poultry and seafood fabrication and portioning.
Demonstrate a proficiency in food preparation skills and cooking techniques for commercial foodservice applications.
Demonstrate basic techniques in garde-manger.
Identify various spices, herbs and food stuff.
Demonstrate how to prepare classical entrees.
Demonstrate how to use culinary equipment and tools not normally found in American kitchens.
Demonstrate an understanding of the theory and practice of advanced cooking techniques.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of advanced culinary terminology.

Prerequisites: CUL 115.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

CUL 231  Garde Manger  

Students will further develop the skills and techniques learned in CUL 230 (Advanced Culinary Skills and Techniques), with emphasis on volume cooking, plating techniques, plate presentation, and garnishing. Students will practice hands-on development of these skills in a professional kitchen.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate proficiency in classical and modern plate presentations.
Demonstrate proficiency in production and safe handling of volume foods for banquets and catering including soups, sauces, proteins, starches and vegetables.
Apply basic garde-manger skills in production of various cold foods.
Prepare hot and cold foods for buffet presentation.

Prerequisites: CUL 230.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

CUL 232  International Cuisine  

Students will learn to prepare Classical and International Cuisines, including Regional American, Asian, European, Latin and Middle Eastern foods. Students will practice hands-on development of these skills in a professional kitchen.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate proficiency in identifying ingredients from various world-wide cuisines.
Prepare regional American cuisine.
Prepare Classical French cuisine.
Prepare traditional and modern Latin cuisine.
Prepare a variety of Middle Eastern foods.
Prepare a variety of traditional and modern Asian cuisines.
Prepare a variety of European foods.
Prepare a variety of Indian foods.

Prerequisites: CUL 230.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

HRM - Hotel/Restaurant Management

HRM 100  Introduction to Hospitality  

This course introduces students to the vast lodging and food service industry. The origins and history of the modern American hotel/motel business and the enormous growth of the food industries are presented in the context of global tourism. Supervisory duties including organizational theory, resource management of the prime cost associated with these businesses, and asset control processes are introduced. Career opportunities are examined as an essential part of the course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Structure task performance in an organization within the lodging/food service industry.
Apply a basic knowledge of the vastness of the hospitality industry to personal career development.
Understand the role(s) of various operational functions.
Use the basic knowledge of record keeping and financial controls common to this industry.
Increase revenue through marketing.

Prerequisites: ENG 050 and REA 050 and (ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 040 or MAT 050). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 110  Food Sanitation and Safety Supervision  

This is a course for food handlers and especially for supervisors employed in the retail foodservice industry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Satisfactorily pass the food handlers examination administered by the college.
Identify the causes of food-borne illness.
Purchase, handle, store, prepare and serve food in accordance with generally accepted sanitation procedures.
Maintain sanitary facilities and equipment.
Prepare an Integrated Pest Management system, and develop and maintain an employee safe work environment.
Apply federal, state and local regulations/laws specific to food-service procedures.
Implement a self-inspect sanitation and safety program in a food-service operation.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 3 Weekly Lab Hours

HRM 140  Tourism: Principles, Practices, Philosophies  

In this course the student will acquire adequate tourism vocabulary. Student will study the why and how of tourism as an important factor in the wealth of any nation. And in global terms, the course provides an overview of the principles, practices, and philosophies that affect the cultural, social, economic, psychological, and marketing aspects of the travel and tourism industry. Among the topics covered are: meetings and conventions, role of social media, basic tourism marketing principles including mobile/social media marketing. The student will study the history of travel, future prospects and problems in the industry, especially the need for sustainable economic development. The student will explore their personal philosophy of travel as a factor in life's enrichment and identify career opportunities in this vast industry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Appreciate the importance of tourism's economic contribution.
Understand consumer travel behavior.
Achieve a personal philosophy of travel as a factor in life's enrichment.
Understand basic tourism marketing principles and applicable technology.
Apply tourism supply/demand principles as the basic for policy and planning.
Distribution of destination services with emphasis on consumer orientation.
Study the tourism policy in the Delaware Valley region.
Identify possible career opportunities in this field.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 040 or MAT 050). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 145  Sales and Marketing in Hospitality  

In this course the student will learn to explain and apply the theory of successful hospitality marketing and sales. The topics of developing hospitality marketing and sales plans will be covered. The organization of the typical sales and marketing office within the corporate and individual property will be discussed. Various personal sales techniques such as suggestive selling and upselling in the hotel/restaurant reservation and direct patron contacts will be explained. Marketing to all segments of tourism including social, education, government, fraternal, recreation and non-profit will be presented.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish marketing from sales.
Identify trends that affect marketing and sales in the hospitality industry.
Identify and describe the key steps of a hospitality marketing plan.
Summarize the duties and responsibilities of staff and management positions typically found in a lodging property marketing and sales operation.
Perform the five steps of a hospitality presentation sales cell.
Explain effective telephone communication, email, technology (CRS) and special social media for room and foodservice reservations.
Describe internal marketing and sales promotion.
Explain the role of hospitality advertising, public relations, and publicity.
Explain how lodging and foodservice/restaurant are meeting the current needs of business including meeting planners.
Identify considerations for marketing hospitality products and services to international travelers and other special segments such as social, education, domestic tourists, sports teams, and government travelers.
Summarize trends affecting the food and beverage industry, and describe positioning strategies and techniques for restaurant and beverage operations.
Explain how hotels market and sell to conventions, catered events and trade shows.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 155  Managing Lodging Operations  

This course covers in detail the procedures of the hotel/motel front office, including the duties of the manager, desk agent, night auditor, reservations, credit and cash handling. Meaningful statistics and reports are examined. The interdepartmental roles including housekeeping, maintenance, security and other uniformed staff are discussed. The relationship between employees and guest, room design/layout and the future role of computers are presented.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop a hotel organization structure.
Use basic procedures of a room-reservation system.
Apply specific knowledge of the lodging industry to careers.
Register, sell and assign guest rooms.
Derive room-pricing strategies using various decision-making techniques.
Communicate interdepartmentally using machines, terminology, symbols and racks.
Prepare accounts and control cash using manual and machine procedures.
Use basic procedures of the night audit.
Prepare and use hotel statistical ratios.
Apply basic knowledge of the use of computers.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 162  Laws of Innkeepers  

This course is an applied approach to the legal responsibilities of the operational department heads in lodging properties and all areas of food service. Topics include room reservation contract law, torts, ADA requirements, Civil Rights legislation, tip credit reporting requirements, labor law, dram shop, PA Title 18, 47 and 36. All supervisors and department heads benefit from this practical approach to avoiding the legal problems in this industry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Outline the duties the law creates to protect guests and restaurant/hotel operators.
Discuss areas where food service and lodging properties may be affected by federal, state and local regulations.
Formulate guidelines related to Civil Rights laws.
Identify specific management actions to avoid liability in areas of food and property.
Establish legal guidelines with regard to employee selection, wages and union relations.
Outline procedures to reduce crimes against the business.
Outline tests for the legality and enforceability of contract requirements in food service.
Discuss the legal aspects of lodging and food-service franchising

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 165  Managing Hospitality Human Resources  

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of human resources in the hospitality industry including labor cost forecasting, recruitment, selection, assessment of job performance, compensation and incentive pay programs and benefit plans for both supervisors and hourly employees. Students will discuss the role of collective bargaining on the industry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); distinguish between EEOC laws and affirmative action.
Describe how the results of job analysis are used to job descriptions and job specifications.
Explain and apply methods for forecasting labor demand, and identify the advantages and disadvantages of internal and external recruiting.
Describe the importance of the selection process, and identify the types of selection errors and biases managers must overcome when interviewing job applicants.
Explain the purpose of an orientation program.
Identify and describe the stages of the training cycle, and explain how a training needs assessment is developed and conducted.
Describe the functions of performance appraisals.
Describe types of compensation, and outline the major influences on compensation plans.
Outline the steps and identify options for establishing pay structures and identify the characteristics and advantages of effective incentive programs.
Describe the impact of the various Civil Rights laws on the industry.
Describe four general categories of employees’ benefits and several factors to consider when developing benefit plans.
Outline the reasons employees join unions.
Identify mandatory, voluntary, and illegal collective bargaining issues.
Describe how management should prepare for collective bargaining.
Explain the purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and describe the enforcement of OSHA standards and requirements.
Describe the hospitality industry’s turnover problem, demonstrates how to calculate turnover rates, and identify the costs, causes and impact of turnover.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 199  Hotel and Restaurant Management Internship CSEL  

Internship and/or College Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) provides qualified, enthusiastic students with opportunities to receive academic credit for work experience in the hospitality field. Internships and/or CSEL combine classroom theory with practical, real-world employment experiences. Students participating in this 180 experience will earn 3 college credits for this experience. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have earned 21 or more credits at DCCC Have an overall average grade point average of 2.5 Obtain written recommendation from a DCCC instructor of Hotel and Restaurant Management or Culinary Arts Submit an updated resume and application for this course to the Office of Student Employment Services

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop, observe and perform technical skills as required in the hospitality work position assigned by employer.
Develop, observe and perform interpersonal skills as required in the hopitality work position assigned by employer.
Observe and use the equipment and technology used in the hospitality work position assigned by employer.
Submit written reports and/or journals as required by the Office of Student Employment Services and supervising faculty.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 253  Restaurant Management  

The procedures, practices and methods of food service operational management are presented in detail. The following topics are discussed: menu planning, pricing, merchandising, food purchasing, receiving, storage, issuing, inventory and controls. Kitchen supervision and design (workflow); employee training, labor cost/payroll analysis are topics of discussion.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply organizational theory to the practical performance of management functions.
Use internal operational controls.
Plan and design a menu.
Purchase, receive, store and issue food.
Design and lay out the operational areas.
Deliver prepared foods to consumers.
Perform administrative tasks with regard to personnel.
Promote and merchandise products and services of a food-service operation.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 254  Catering & Event Planning  

This course emphasizes the use of standardized recipes, work improvement techniques, menu pre-costing/pricing in the planning of quantity foodservice operations. Discussions include catering, on/off premise event planning, sales and marketing practices and operational reports/record keeping. Students will plan a quantity food event.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Use formulas in determining food yields and perform recipe conversions for large groups.
Eliminate unnecessary work in a quantity food situation through the use of continuous process improvement.
Use banquet/catering management practices, policies and procedures as they relate to planning, organizing, staffing and controlling a large party/event.
Explore the current computer software designed for catering management.
Plan and cost a special event for a large event with meal.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HRM 255  Beverage Management  

This is a course for those wishing to learn how to operate a beverage outlet and serve controlled beverages responsibly. This is not a bartending course. The course includes restaurant bar operations, hotel room beverage service, catering bar systems and beer distributors. The federal standards of identity under USCA 27 and Pennsylvania Law Title 47 and any appropriate criminal codes will be presented.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Make personal choices in career development and business decisions with regard to beverage management.
Structure task performance within a beverage operation.
Purchase, receive, store and issue beverages in accordance with generally accepted procedures.
Properly use equipment, tools and terminology specific to beverage operations.
Demonstrate the basic practices of mixology.
Apply merchandising techniques within an overall marketing strategy of a beverage operation.
Gather and apply information for internal control and operational decision making.
Discuss third-party liability as affected by the environment of a beverage operation.
Apply federal, state and local regulations/laws specific to beverage commerce.

Prerequisites: HRM 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours