Academic Catalog

Society and Human Behavior

The College Transfer Office is set up to help Delaware County Community College students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. If you are planning to transfer, you are strongly encouraged to meet with a transfer advisor within your first two semesters (or before you reach 30 transferable college credits from all institutions attended).

Associate in Arts (AA) Degrees

Global Studies (GLOS)

The major in Global Studies will give students interdisciplinary perspectives on the interplay of local and global communities as well as prepare students to participate effectively in this global environment. The program is designed for students planning to earn at least a bachelor’s degree in areas such as International Relations, International Studies, Global Affairs, National Security Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies.

History (HIS)

The History Program is designed primarily but not limited to those students who wish to pursue a Baccalaureate Degree in History. The program of study will provide students with the foundational history courses as well as those courses that meet their general education requirements. Upon successful completion of an Associate in Arts Degree in History they will be able to transfer into parallel programs.

Social Work (SWO)

The Social Work Associate in Arts curriculum was developed to meet the needs of current and prospective students interested in transferring to a college or university and eventually earning a Bachelor in Social Work degree. The curriculum provides students with the introductory-level knowledge in the field of social work study and supports a seamless transfer to the junior level status at a four-year college or university offering a Council of Social Work Education-Accredited Bachelor in Social Work degree (BSW).

Social Workers serve some of the most vulnerable populations; therefore this degree addresses the significant history, policies, theories and applied practices utilized when working with marginalized individuals, families, groups and communities. Social Workers use a person and environment construct that views human challenges through a diverse, multi-systemic lens. An overarching goal of the program is to prepare students to demonstrate the basic knowledge, values and skills that are required of a beginning social work practitioner.

Various transfer institutions require differing elective courses; therefore students are highly encouraged to work closely with a transfer counselor, from the DCCC Career and Counseling Center, to ensure a seamless transfer process to a four-year institution.

Associate in Science (AS) Degrees

Psychology (PSY)

The Psychology program is designed for students planning to earn at least a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology or a closely related field. The curriculum focuses on developing a solid foundation of knowledge regarding human thought, behavior and emotion, both individual and collective. The various courses are intended to foster the development of cultural, personal and professional awareness. Additionally, students are encouraged to strengthen critical thinking, technological and communication skills.

Sociology (SOC)

The associate’s degree in Sociology is designed for students planning to earn at least a bachelor’s degree in Sociology. The program’s curriculum is also an excellent choice for students who desire a more comprehensive understanding of social group behavior, as well as those who plan to practice in one of the social science professions. Concentration in the curriculum develops student understanding of group dynamics, social interactions, including their genesis and evolution and environmental factors that shape human perceptions and behavior. The curriculum focus is not only paramount to learning the theories, skills, practices and values required for transfer to a bachelor’s degree-bearing program, but also develops students’ analytical skills and provides them with an enriched educational experience.

View full A-Z Course List

HIS - History

HIS 110  American History I  

An inquiry into the history of the United States from the introduction of African and European peoples into the existing populations of the Americas through the period of the Civil War. Includes the cultural origins and initial interactions of African, European and Native American peoples in the Western Hemisphere and the initial phases of a global economy, British Colonization and the establishment of diverse cultures in North America, the Period of the American Revolution, Confederation and Constitution, the establishment of unique political, social and economic structures in the early Republic, cultural and political conflict between Free and Slave States, and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explore variables of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religious background to demonstrate the diversity of American cultural development in colonizing America and the early history of the United States.
Discuss historical information regarding the foundation and formation of the United States to promote a global understanding of the interdependence of peoples and nations that can be used to create dialogue on meaningful and relevant events in their own place and time.
Develop analytical skills through an evaluation of cause and effect of events from pre-Colonization to the Civil War to suggest how and why events happen based upon historical fact sets.
Develop critical thinking skills through an explanation of the significance of historical information within varying contexts, theoretical models and methods.
Explain the difference between types of evidence and interpretation to give students a clear understanding of how to use evidence and commentary from primary and secondary sources to develop interpretive frameworks on a variety of information types.
Use social science methods and models to give students effective tools to compose their own interpretations in both oral and written formats.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 120  American History II  

An inquiry into the history of the United States from the Reconstruction to the present; includes the process of reconstruction of the Union and the rise of Jim Crow, post-Civil War industrialization, immigration and urbanization, the Western frontiers, the emergencies of the Labor Movement, United States diplomatic history, the Progressive Era, World War I, post-war prosperity and the Great Depression, New Deal policy and diplomacy, World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam, Civil Rights Movement and various social movements of the 1960s, the America in the a globalizing world in the latter part of the 20th century.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop critical thinking skills to analyze the political, economic, diplomatic and military changes that have occurred from the Reconstruction to the present.
Explore variables of Race, Ethnicity, Class, Sexuality, and Religious Background to demonstrate the Diversity of American Cultural Development.
Extract facts and commentary from primary and secondary sources to compose historical interpretations in both oral and written formats.
Discuss history historical information to promote an intellectual capacity to create dialogue on meaningful and relevant events in their own place and time.
Analyze the development of the United States in a global framework.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 150  World Civilizations I  

An introductory history of the development of the world's major civilizations to 1500. The course emphasizes the role of economic, social, and political change throughout the ancient and medieval periods of world civilization. Students will gain a greater understanding of the foundations of world civilizations and cultures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Think critically and analytically about the development and nature of separate world cultures created over several centuries.
Explain the creation of the political, economic, social, and religious foundations and stratification of civilization in the ancient period to 1500.
Understand how societies devised different solutions to key difficulties in forging a durable civilization.
Comprehend the role of geography and environment in the development of diverse civilizations.
Understand of the roots of the modern world through the examination of ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and socio-economic diversity of ancient world civilizations.
Discuss the implications of early aspects of globalization in world history.
Utilize information literacy of a variety of source material to examine and discuss world history.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 160  World Civilizations II  

An introductory history of the development of the world's major civilizations since 1500. The course emphasizes the role of economic, social, and political change throughout modern world history. Students will gain a greater appreciation for the interaction and interdependence of nations and cultures within the modern world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Think critically and analytically the development and nature of separate world cultures created over several centuries.
Understand the creation of a global community from 1500 through the twentieth century.
Explain how societies devised different responses to globalization.
Understand the creation of the contemporary world through analysis of the major historical themes from 1500 through the twentieth century.
Comprehend the ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and socio-economic diversity of global societies since 1500.
Utilize information literacy and a variety of source material to examine modern world history.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 190  History Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. pon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE Prerequisites: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

HIS 194  History Internship (2 Credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. pon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE Prerequisites: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 199  History Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE Prerequisites: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits

HIS 200  Civil War and Reconstruction  

This course encompasses the critical period of American history from 1850 to 1877. It examines the political, social, diplomatic and economic aspects of the Antebellum, Civil War and Reconstruction periods. It also emphasizes the military and naval activities of the time. Students will be introduced to scholarly writings and research about the primary and secondary sources dealing with the American Civil War and Reconstruction.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the causes, major events, and ramifications of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Think and write critically and analytically about the political, social, diplomatic and economic issues concerning the American Civil War and Reconstruction, its causes, and its outcomes, with an emphasis upon the concepts of Modern War and Total War.
Utilize information literacy to become familiar with scholarly literature and identify differing points of view on controversial political, social, diplomatic, and economic topics pertaining to the American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Utilize information literacy to identify, read, comprehend and synthesize primary and secondary sources dealing with the political, social, diplomatic, and economic aspects of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Evaluate the successes and failures of the American Civil War and Reconstruction with emphasis upon their significance in the issues of race, politics, and culture in American today.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 201  African-American History  

This course is an introductory survey course in black history. It exposes students to the roles played by Africans and people of African descent in world history.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Trace African heritage and culture in both Africa and the United States.
Evaluate the contributions and influence of African people in the development of Western Culture.
Describe the experience and contributions of Afro-Americans in the United States.
Assess the history of the African continent in terms of cultural, political and economic factors from the earliest periods to the present, including Sub-Saharan/Islamic Africa, the pre-colonial eras and post-World War II development.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 224  History of the First World War  

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major causes, events, and ramifications of the Great War. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the problems that led to the conflict, the major events that shaped its outcome, and the effects of the war that still resonate today. Students will also be exposed to primary and secondary sources pertaining to the Great War.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the causes, major events, and ramifications of the Great War.
Think and write critically and analytically about issues concerning the Great War,its causes, and its outcomes; with an emphasis upon the concepts of Modern War, Total War and Global War.
Utilize information literacy to become familiar with scholarly literature and identify differing points of view on controversial topics pertaining to the Great War.
Utilize information literacy to identify, read, comprehend, and synthesize primary and secondary sources dealing with the Great War.
Recognize how the Great War still resonates in the today's global issues.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 225  History of the Second World War  

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major causes, events, and ramifications of the Second World War. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the problems that led to the conflict, the major events that shaped its outcome, and the effects of the war that still resonate today. Students will also be exposed to primary and secondary sources pertaining to the Second World War.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the causes, major events, and ramifications of the Second World War.
Think and write critically and analytically about issues concerning the Second World War, its causes, and its outcomes; with an emphasis upon the concepts of Modern War, Total War, and Global War.
Utilize information literacy to become familiar with scholarly literature and identify differing points of view on controversial topics pertaining to the Second World War.
Utilize information literacy to identify, read, comprehend, and synthesize primary and secondary sources dealing with the Second World War.
Recognize how the Second World War still resonates in today’s global issues.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 235  20th Century World History  

Twentieth Century World History is a course where students will closely examine many of the major events that have played a role in forming much of the contemporary world. Liberalism, Capitalism, Socialism and various forms of Nationalism will be explored through events like World War I and World War II, the Cold War and Post-Colonial liberation movements to show the progress and poverty of human civilization in its latest developments. The course ends with topics like the Internet and the War on Terror to shed light on the dawning of the 21st century.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop critical thinking skills in the analysis and evaluation of global cultural, political, diplomatic, economic and military events that have occurred in the 20th century.
Understand variables of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religious background to understand issues of global diversity in events such as the Holocaust, the Russian Revolution and Islamic Jihadism.
Comprehend the differences between various forms of evidence and commentary through examining some of the most important primary sources of the 20th century , which will enable the student to develop historical interpretations in both oral and written formats.
Discuss historical information and ideas from disparate sources like Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points to Adolph Hitler's writings in Mein Kampf to promote an intellectual capacity to create dialogue on meaningful and relevant events in their own place and time.
Analyze the development of human behavior in a global framework, and note the global impact of a variety of topics from World Wars, to the use of fossil fuels to the internet.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 252  Women in History  

This is a survey course in Women's History. It will not only focus on the historical struggles to attain status but will also examine dominant thought within the discipline such as feminism, postmodernism, Womanist and global theories as related to women.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the evolution of the biological, ideological and political subordination of women.
Examine the different facets of social activism to achieve extension of academic and political rights.
Investigate the dominant issues relating to women such as health, reproductive rights, employment and violence.
Contrast the economic and social status women's lives in different countries and the role of culture in determining their status.
Explore the cultural expressions of women that give definition to their lives.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HIS 256  History of Modern Islam  

A inquiry into the history of the Islam and the Middle East from the life of the Prophet Mohammed, through the cultural and political spread of Islamic peoples into Africa and Europe with the Caliphate, to the Islamic Renaissance of the Early Middle Ages, the Empires of the Ottomans, Safavids and Moguls and into the 20th century with the rise of oil and secular states. The course will complement existing courses on the religion of Islam to show the intersection of religion with political and cultural institutions as they spread from the core Islamic lands in the Arabian Peninsula to the broader world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Assess the causes and effects of major events and developments within the Islamic World and the Middle East.
Trace the origin and the early history of Islamic culture as an outgrowth of the life of the Prophet Mohammed and Arabic culture.
Note the spread of Islam and the rise of extensive scientific, artistic and cultural development with the Islamic Renaissance of the Early Middle Ages, which will begin the expansion of the growth and prosperity of Western Civilization.
Examine the Middle East's role in energy production in the 20th century and how the beliefs of Islam inform economic policy in the emerging global economy.
Draw distinctions and continuities through time with the ongoing battle between secularism and fundamentalism in the Islamic world.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY - Psychology

PSY 130  Personal and Career Development  

This course examines the theoretical and empirical issues related to personal growth and career development. The purpose of this course is to increase self-awareness, understand the career development process, and practice the ability to effect personal change. Emphasis is on self-awareness, personal growth, and career exploration that is examined theoretically and applied to the self and others in a diverse society. Content includes identity development, self-assessment, social influence, self-esteem, mindfulness, career development, and behavior change.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply the psychological theories fundamental to identity (self) development, personality, and behavioral change.
Demonstrate self-awareness by identifying their personality traits, interests, skills, and values.
Identify the factors that contribute to an individual’s career development and apply this knowledge to their own career choices.
Summarize psychological factors that can influence the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle.
Describe how coping strategies, including mindfulness, can be applied to everyday living.
Explain how individual differences and worldview may influence beliefs, values, and interaction with others and vice versa.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Corequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 140  General Psychology  

This course is a one-semester introduction to the basic principles and major theoretical approaches that are used to explain human behavior, with emphasis on understanding and application of such principles and theories as they relate to ourselves and our surroundings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the nature of psychology and describe the methods used by psychologists to study behavior.
Identify the major physiological structures involved in the study of behavior.
Identify the principles of sensation and perception.
Describe current theories of learning and thinking explaining their influence in education, life-span development, and other life situations.
Describe the major trends in explaining human emotion and motivation and how they are assessed.
Identify the major theories of human personality and development.
Evaluate the impact of major trends in analyzing ourselves, interpersonal and social relationships and the origins, classification and treatment of mental disorders.
Explain the relationship among physiology, perception, learning, cognition, motivation, and personality, applying them to understanding life situations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 190  Psychology Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

1 Credit

PSY 194  Psychology Internship (2 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

2 Credits

PSY 199  Psychology Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 200  Personality Theories  

Emphasis in this course is on the understanding and application of basic concepts of psychodynamic, trait, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic-existential perspectives to personal and interpersonal functioning. Biological influences on personality are also considered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Detail the characteristics of psychodynamic theories.
Describe the Five-Factor and other trait approaches to personality.
Describe behavioral perspectives on personality.
Identify the characteristics of cognitive theories of personality.
Describe humanistic and existential personality views and the basics of positive psychology.
Discuss the role of biological processes in personality development and expression.
Explain how an eclectic blend of several major personality theories can be applied to common life situations and experiences.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 202  Theories of Counseling  

This course is a one-semester introduction to the basic theoretical approaches used in counseling. This course is designed to give students an overview of the different psychological theories used by counselors, therapists and human service professionals. A goal of the course is to allow students with an interest in human services to better understand the options open to both counselors and clients when engaging in the therapeutic process. While the curriculum will not make counselors of the students who complete this course, it will provide a foundation of knowledge about the major theories.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe relevant counseling theories.
Understand various ethical issues in the practice of counseling.
Describe the terminology associated with various theories.
Identify the major contributors associated with various theories.
Explain the assumptions of each theory.
Identify the goals of each theory.
Identify the roles of the therapist and the client within each theory.
Explain the process of therapy for each theory.
Identify the various techniques associated with each theory.
Evaluate the strengths and limitations of each theory.
Describe the characteristics of a multiculturally competent counselor.

Prerequisites: PSY 140 and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 203  Counseling Skills  

This experiential course is a one-semester introduction to the basic skills used in the helping process. The course is designed for individuals pursuing a career in social work, or other related human service fields of study. The focus is on development, synthesis, analysis and demonstration of critical reasoning in the use of the core skills that facilitate effective and culturally responsive helping relationships. This course includes both didactic instruction and the development of basic techniques through frequent, applied counseling skills lab activities and written self reflection assignments.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the knowledge, values and skills of the Social Work or Psychology or Counseling profession at the introductory level and analyze the decisions made for use of certain counseling skills in practice lab activities.
Demonstrate the effective use of basic counseling skills for introductory practice.
Assess self-awareness by personal reflection and self-correction in periodic written personal evaluations showing the development of a professional identity and cultural competency.
Analyze and synthesize multiple sources of knowledge, including: prevention, intervention, theory, cultural competency and evaluation in the applied lab activities.
Demonstrate, in alignment with the NASW or APA or ACA Standards for Cultural Competency, the introductory level knowledge, values and counseling skills necessary to work from a strengths perspective with diverse populations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (PSY 140 or SWO 101) and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 204  Addiction, Drugs, and the Brain  

In order to develop a greater knowledge of the nature and complexity of addiction, the course provides an introduction to basic principles of psychopharmacology, including the neurochemistry of drug action, chemical signaling in the nervous system, and the anatomy of several neurotransmitter systems, as well as the behavioral assessment of drug effects. Students will develop an understanding of the addiction process utilizing a biopsychosocial perspective that involves knowing about the neurobiological, behavioral and social factors that influence drug use and abuse. Topics examined may include, but are not limited to, addictions to substances as well as other addictive behaviors, various psychopharmacological principles and research techniques, the mechanism of action of several drugs of abuse, and pharmacological treatments for psychological disorders such as Substance Use Disorder and psychotic, mood, and anxiety disorders. Prevention and treatment options will be discussed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological perspectives of addiction.
Explain the physiology and neural mechanisms of the addiction process.
Identify and describe the mechanism of action of major substances and behaviors of abuse.
Examine basic concepts in pharmacology and various psychopharmacological principles and research techniques.
Explain the pharmacological treatments for psychological disorders including, but not limited to, Substance Use Disorder and psychotic, mood, and anxiety disorders.
Identify programs that provide prevention services as well as those which provide rehabilitation programs and support services.
Identify populations where addiction is highly prevalent and explain the psychological and sociological factors that may be contributing to this phenomenon.

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or BIO 110 or BIO 150.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 205  Human Sexuality  

Utilizing a biopsychosocial model, this course seeks to foster healthy attitudes toward sexuality by providing knowledge and having discussions about the formation of sexual beliefs and myths, the anatomy and physiology of human sexual systems, the psychological and social aspects of sex and gender roles, love and sexuality, sexual minorities, and the legal aspects of sexuality. (Note: material of a sensitive nature will be discussed in this course).

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and explain the nature of human sexuality as a scientific discipline.
Describe and analyze major theoretical perspectives of human sexuality from biological, behavioral, social, political, and historical perspectives.
Identify and explain different research methods used to examine human sexuality and variations in sexual behavior.
Discuss psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to issues addressing human sexuality, gender, and sexual orientation.
Understand historical and contemporary issues surrounding sexuality in our society.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role of emotions in sexual expression.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 210  Lifespan Human Development  

This course investigates how and why people of diverse backgrounds change over time. It surveys theories, research and controversies of human development from conception to death. It analyzes the physical, cognitive and psycho-social development in ecological contexts from multidisciplinary perspectives. Emphasis is on how to promote well-being and growth, and to overcome developmental challenges throughout life span.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic universal principles underlying human development.
Describe the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of lifespan development.
Explain major theories and methodologies related to lifespan human development.
Describe and analyze major changes across different stages throughout lifespan (prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, aging, and death and dying).
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of lifespan human development in today's global context.
Describe and discuss major crises, disabilities, undesirable developmental outcomes and the historical social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination) on developmental differences.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth for optimal personal development in today's complex society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 215  Industrial Psychology  

The study of organizations and groups from a psychological perspective. The course covers fundamentals of organizational behavior, motivation and reward systems, leadership and organizational change, rumor, resistance to change, management styles and stress as it applies to the workplace. It is designed to meet the special needs of business administration students, as well as business management and psychology majors. It will also prove of great value to anyone contemplating any supervisory or management position, such as in nursing, education, social work and construction technology.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define organizational behavior, list the key elements and understand why it is important to understand the psychological principles affecting the workplace.
Understand and explain a motivational theory that pertains to industrial and organizational psychology.
Understand the nature of organizational communications, including the factors that influence decision making.
Understand the nature of leadership and be able to list at least three leadership skills.
Explain "social environment" conformity.
Understand the power of rumor and how it might be controlled.
Explain the concept of industrial participation by employees including: (1) process, (2) prerequisites, (3) benefits, (4) types, and (5) limitations.
Be familiar with the social problems and ethical issues that cause stress and distress in the workplace.
Know the various responsibilities incumbent upon worker and employer regarding referral and treatment of social problems in industry.
Understand the nature of "change" in the workplace.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and PSY 140. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 220  Abnormal Psychology  

The nature of abnormal behavior, its etiology and classification together with a brief examination of treatment methods are emphasized. Psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic-existential, and socio-cultural perspectives will be considered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and compare ambiguities inherent in the psychological and cultural definitions of abnormality.
Identify and describe major historical and current theoretical perspectives regarding the causation of abnormal behavior and explain how each is regarded in society.
Identify and describe the major mental disorders and summarize the diagnostic criteria for each.
Define and give examples of key terms and research methods used in studying abnormal psychology.
Identify and describe the titles, training, and responsibilities of professionals working in the field of mental health.
List and describe the major treatment methods of mental disorders.
Identify major legal and ethical challenges in which law and abnormal psychology intersect.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 221  Social Psychology  

This course examines theories and research in the study of the social influences on individual behavior. It explores the various ways people think about and relate to one another. Topics include self-concept, persuasion, conformity, and aggression. Emphasis is placed on diversity, social justice issues, and different perspectives on the interaction of person and context.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply psychological theory and research to social issues and problems.
Describe aspects of the self as they relate to social and cultural influences.
Assess the significance of attitudes on perception, moral judgment, prejudice and prosocial behavior.
Depict the impact of violence and aggression on the individual, the group and society.
Cite the ways in which social factors can dictate individual behavior.
Analyze the ways humans relate to one another, including prejudice and discrimination.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 225  Experiences in Diversity  

This course critically examines systems of stratification within the United States. Topics include: race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender and sexual orientation. Study is concentrated on understanding the legal and policy based frameworks which created and perpetuate group-based inequality for various people in the U.S.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the etiology of racist, homophobic, ethnocentric, and sexist ideologies.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation.
Describe the impact of minority and majority status as it pertains to economic, psychological and social experience.
List contradictions between the idea that we all have certain inalienable rights and the reality that certain groups in our society continue to be denied many of those rights.
List contributions of those outside of the "mainstream" and understand how those marginalized "others" started social movements which challenged the US to become more democratic, and inclusive.
Describe the systematic ways that inequality due to race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation are perpetuated and possibly eradicated by society’s social institutions.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 235  Educational Psychology  

This course introduces students to theories, research, and applied topics related to teaching and learning. It studies developmentally appropriate education with learner diversity and multicultural influences. Emphasis is on how to effectively motivate learners through appropriate teaching design, class management and assessment, and how to connect theory to teaching and learning practices in today’s global contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and evaluate major theories and approaches related to cognitive development, teaching and learning.
Analyze and evaluate learners’ physical, cognitive and social-emotional characteristics of development.
Describe and analyze teacher’s role in motivating learners.
Identify and discuss effective instructional design, class management, assessment, and other teaching/learning practices in today’s global contexts.
Identify and analyze social/cultural influences (including discrimination and inequality) on learner distress, and accommodations for students from diverse (such as special needs, poverty, multicultural, multilingual and other) backgrounds.
Apply effective principles to promote self-understanding and personal/career development.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 241  Child Development  

This course examines physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in ecological contexts from conception to adolescence. It surveys various theories and research of child development, and examines social/cultural influences that may shape or compromise normal development and transitions in today's global contexts. Emphasis is on how to promote healthy growth and overcome developmental challenges during this life stage.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the basic principles underlying child development.
Describe and analyze the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of development from prenatal to adolescence.
Describe and explain major theories and research methods of child development.
Identify and evaluate major changes at different stages (prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle and late childhood, adolescence).
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of child development in today's global context.
Describe and analyze social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination) on normal and atypical childhood development and transitions.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth, to promote optimal personal/career development for both individual and family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 242  Adolescent Psychology  

This course examines physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in ecological contexts from puberty to maturity. It surveys various theories and research of adolescent development. It examines social/cultural influences that may shape/compromise development and transitions in today's global contexts. Emphasis is on how to promote healthy growth and overcome developmental challenges during adolescence.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the basic principles underlying adolescent development.
Describe and analyze the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of development from puberty to maturity.
Describe and explain major theories and research methods of adolescent development.
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of adolescent development in today's global context.
Describe and analyze social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination, etc) on adolescent development and transitions.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth, to promote optimal personal/career development for both individual and family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 255  Intro to Biological Psychology  

Biological psychology (sometimes called physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience) is the study of how different systems in the body, primarily the nervous system, coordinate to produce experience and behavior. This course is designed to be an introduction to this interdisciplinary field of study. Topics range from the cellular basis of neuronal activities, the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes and disorders. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behavior to clinical disorders. Successful completion of this course will provide a strong foundation of basic knowledge and methodological competencies in Biological Psychology/Neuroscience required of Psychology majors at 4-year institutions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the structure and function of the nervous system, neuroanatomy, and the divisions of the nervous system.
Analyze the structure and function of neurons, the electrical and chemical communication between neurons, and the major neurotransmitters.
Describe and evaluate the biological and physiological basis of psychological experience and behavior (including sensory and motor experience, motivation, learning and memory, consciousness, reproductive behaviors, psychological disorders and addiction).
Understand developmental changes in the brain and nervous system across the lifespan.
Evaluate the psychological and behavioral consequences of damage to the physiological systems.
Interpret and communicate research findings within the field of biological psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 290  Adulthood and Aging  

This course is an examination of the biological, physical, psychological, cognitive, affective, social and cultural changes that occur as people move from adulthood into old age. It explores the controversies, myths, and realities of growing older in America. As well, the course emphasizes the similarities and differences of adulthood and aging across cultures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic principles underlying development from the adult years through the end of life.
Identify the major physical and biological changes in adult development from adulthood to old age.
Describe the various cognitive changes in adult development, such as those related to memory, intelligence, thinking, and problem solving.
Evaluate the various theoretical explanations of cognitive, affective, socio-cultural and personality development in adult development through old age.
Evaluate the relevance of cross-cultural research findings in adult development and aging.
Examine multiple perspectives on death and dying, considering the individual, family, and culture.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC - Sociology

SOC 100  Human Relations  

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic principles of sociology with emphasis on human relationships in community and industrial settings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the importance of human relations in the community and occupational spheres.
Interact effectively in the social context.
Describe the significance of self-awareness in building good human relationships.
Distinguish between the formal and informal structures of an organization as they relate to appropriate human relations.
Describe appropriate employee on-the-job behavior, especially during the first few probationary months.
Describe how the impact of human relations in the leadership and motivational areas can affect productivity.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 110  Introduction to Sociology  

This course studies the factors that determine social organization, social injustice, behavior and change as they are considered in relation to the individual student's own life and society. Study is concentrated on social intervention, culture, social class, national and global inequality, institutions and socialization.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the sociological perspective to their own lives.
Further personal development through knowledge and in the socialization process.
Describe the impact of the five major social institutions on society and themselves.
Assess present and possible future effects of social change on their culture's and values.
Depict the effects of living in a modern complex society.
Use the three major sociological theoretical perspectives to analyze a major concept within sociology.
Describe the systematic ways that oppression and privilege are built into and perpetuated by social institutions.
Describe the various ways in which global interdependence impacts the social, economic and political society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 120  Social Problems  

This course studies contemporary social problems from theoretical and practical perspectives. Theoretical assessments of the national and international origins and etiology that support and sustain social injustice, inequality, and conflict will be supported through data sources.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the sociological perspective to the national and international social problems.
Describe the origin, development, and society's possible treatment of at least two contemporary and social problems detailing how the rules of society and its social institutions attempt to sustain, perpetuate and/or eradicate inequity and injustice.
Describe the systematic ways that oppression is facilitated by powerful people and society's social institutions.
Describe the various ways in which global interdependence impacts the people in society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 131  Sport, Culture and Society  

Sports are cultural phenomena encompassing many facets of social life. Sports, Culture, and Society is designed to analyze society’s engagement in competitive sports as spectators. The course will explore the role of sports in society and the various types of social responses to the culture of sports. Topics that will be analyzed include media and sports, social inequality and sports, youth and sports, education and sports, gender and sports, politics and sports, violence in sports, and ethics in sports. The course will focus upon current events in the American culture that influence how people in society respond to sports.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand how and why sports have been created and organized in particular ways.
Articulate the ways that social, political and economic factors influence the growth, popularity and visibility of sports in society.
Describe the role sports play in school activities for youth.
List ways in which the media depict sports relative to gender.
Describe the positive and negative outcomes of participation in sports on group engagement and social growth.
Describe the manners in which sports motivate aggressive and violent behavior in society.
Understand the social processes that occur in connection with sports (competition, conflict, socialization, group cooperation).
Evaluate how sports have an impact on people's thoughts about their bodies and about gender, race/ethnicity, social class and disability.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 180  Marriage and The Family  

This course explores various types of family relationships in society and how sustaining and changing the values, beliefs and rules in relationships are supported and altered through society's institutions in diverse societies.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the American family in terms of the three major sociological theories.
Explain the concepts concerning who marries whom.
Describe how the rules in institutions shape perceptions of what constitutes a family and may reinforce inequality and discrimination.
Explain human reproduction, including prenatal aspects, childbirth, contraceptive techniques and socially transmitted diseases.
Assess possible future changes in what family forms, marriage forms and living arrangements are as they may affect the American family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 210  Cultural Anthropology  

The societal and individualistic characteristics of culture are explored by examining and comparing several cultures. The evolution of community living from hunting and gathering societies to contemporary urban and suburban and there effects of individual behavior are explored.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the cultural anthropological perspective to his/her own life.
Demonstrate usage of the fundamental principles involved in the study of culture to daily living.
Explain various types of "world views" as found in different cultures.
Describe the impact of the cultural environment upon the student's personality.
Assess the effects of cultural change upon the student's own and his/her culture's fundamental values.
Describe the systematic ways that social institutions may inhibit cultural change and reinforce inequality.
Describe global interdependence from a "world view" and how it impacts various cultures and societies.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 215  Experiences in Diversity  

This course critically examines systems of stratification within the United States. Topics include: race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender and sexual orientation. Study is concentrated on understanding the legal and policy based frameworks which created and perpetuate group-based inequality for various people in the U.S.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the etiology of racist, homophobic, ethnocentric, and sexist ideologies.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation.
Describe the impact of minority and majority status as it pertains to economic, psychological and social experience.
List contradictions between the idea that we all have certain inalienable rights and the reality that certain groups in our society continue to be denied many of those rights.
List contributions of those outside of the "mainstream" and understand how those marginalized "others" started social movements which challenged the US to become more democratic, and inclusive.
Describe the systematic ways that inequality due to race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation are perpetuated and possibly eradicated by society's social institutions.

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 219  The Sociology of Race And Immigration  

In this class we will scrutinize the Eurocentric construction of race, delving into how it was used as a central organizing principle in North American society. We will also explore racism as an ideology, and how it was and is used to create, promote and perpetuate racial inequality. In focusing on racism, we will discuss social policies which promote (d) and protect(ed) white wealth, while at the same time denying people of color access to opportunity and resources. In this context we will discuss white privilege, color-blindness, and affirmative action policies. In addition, we will research the immigration debate. In order to do this, we will work on defining the catch-all term “diversity, and then examine (1) immigration to the USA, paying close attention to the manner in which various group experiences were (and are) similar to, and different from, one another; (2) theories of integration; and (3) the multiculturalism debate. Furthermore, we will examine the “other” from the viewpoint of those marginalized in society. Therefore, we will explore the relationship between the dominant - hegemonic - culture, and sub-cultural beliefs, attitudes, challenges, and attempts to redefine group status. This means we will focus upon power relationships and the dynamics of group attempts to access power, and how social movements have shaped and transformed U.S. social fabric. This class will be both historical in nature and present-day oriented. We will take the time to study the past because without such knowledge we can neither understand nor examine the current system of racial domination. Such inquiry will help shed light on how historical circumstances continue to impact and shape current racialized identities and disparities. A field trip may be required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the social construction of racial and ethnic categories.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race, ethnicity, racism and racial stratification.
List the racial contradictions inherent in US society, and different strategies toward resolving them.
Describe various immigrant experiences in the US using macro theories of integration.
Analyze public policies and laws which shape group identity and social movements.
Present ideas clearly in a formal and professional manner.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 215 or PSY 225.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 220  Social Psychology  

This course examines theories and research in the study of the social influences on individual behavior. It explores the various ways people think about and relate to one another. Topics include self-concept, persuasion, conformity, and aggression. Emphasis is placed on diversity, social justice issues, and different perspectives on the interaction of person and context.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply psychological theory and research to social issues and problems.
Describe aspects of the self as they relate to social and cultural influences.
Assess the significance of attitudes on perception, moral judgment, prejudice and prosocial behavior.
Depict the impact of violence and aggression on the individual, the group and society.
Cite the ways in which social factors can dictate individual behavior.
Analyze the ways humans relate to one another, including prejudice and discrimination.

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 240  Human Geography  

This class will look at how places and regions are interconnected, how they are unique, and how people, ideas, and things moving from one locale to another can change a place or region. After taking this class, students will view their surroundings in new ways by asking questions like: Why are peoples, cultures, and places what they are? Why are they where they are? How can geography help me understand today's changing world?

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define and describe the role of geography as an academic discipline its relation to other subjects, and career possibilities.
Explain the major course themes of globalization and cultural diversity, and how they relate to the various course topics.
Describe the major concepts and principles concerning our human relationship to, and use of, the earth's environment from an historical perspective.
Describe the major aspects of population growth and migration (both internal and international) and list the consequences of continued growth.
Describe the major geographical themes as applied to aspects of human culture such as language, music, religion, and social customs.
Describe the major world agricultural systems.
Describe the primary geographical aspects of economic development, the ways in which it varies, and the ways that countries can promote development.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 260  Research Methodology  

This course investigates and analyzes both quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It is designed to give students the skills to examine social science issues through creating and utilizing empirical research. Study is concentrated on experimentation, types of research sources, survey construction and field participation. Research papers are required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the scientific method and its assumptions as a way of knowing and why it is used in research.
Explain the relationship between theory and research.
Apply the steps in the research design and distinguish between correlational designs.
Describe and distinguish the difference between independent and dependent variables and techniques of experimental control.
Create a literature review on a relevant social science topic.
Detail the process of creating a hypothesis and question for examination through research.
Describe index and scales construction.
Explain the differences between quantitative and qualitative research including correlation, association and causation.
Describe the meaning of validity and reliability in research while demonstrating an understanding of construct, internal and external validity and the threats to validity.
Explain the importance of the IRB and ethics in research.
Explain the difference between random and systematic error.
Apply methods to measure causal and/or associative changes in a dependent variable.
Describe the difference between primary and secondary data.
Describe the experimental and quasi-experimental design.
Explain single IV, factorial and single case designs.
Conduct mock interview and debriefing.
Describe the purpose of a research proposal and write a sample proposal in APA research format.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Literacy (IL)

Prerequisites: (MAT 050 or MAT 060 or MAT 100 or MAT 110 or MAT 111 or MAT 120 or MAT 121 or MAT 125 or MAT 126 or MAT 128 or MAT 135 or MAT 136 or MAT 140 or MAT 141 or MAT 150 or MAT 151 or MAT 152 or MAT 160 or MAT 161 or MAT 200 or MAT 210 or MAT 230 or MAT 260 or MAT 261) and ENG 100 and (SOC 100 or SOC 110 or SOC 120 or SOC 131 or SOC 180 or SOC 210 or SOC 215 or SOC 219 or SOC 220 or SOC 240 or PSY 130 or PSY 140 or PSY 200 or PSY 202 or PSY 203 or PSY 204 or PSY 205 or PSY 210 or PSY 215 or PSY 220 or PSY 221 or PSY 225 or PSY 235 or PSY 241 or PSY 242 or PSY 290).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SWO - Social Work

SWO 101  Introduction to Social Work and Human Services  

This is a one semester introduction to social work and human services and the major policies and practices that are used to understand human strengths and challenges. The course explores the skills, values and knowledge base needed to effectively work as a culturally competent, social work or human service professional in a multidisciplinary setting.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the historical foundation and current role of a Social Worker and a Human Service Worker.
Describe the structure and content of a professional helping relationship.
Identify interventions based on the major case management and counseling models in the field of social work.
Demonstrate the skills necessary for interviewing individuals in a social service or agency setting.
Understand the limitations of implementing services in social service systems.
Explain the impact of the shift of responsibility for social welfare programs from the federal, to the state, to the local government, in the United States.
Demonstrate how knowledge of oppression, privilege, culture, racism, institutional racism, stereotypes, discrimination, and ethnic identity relate to the skills necessary to perform the tasks of a culturally competent human service staff member.
Plan and design an intervention program targeted to a specific population's need for group services.
Evaluate the ethical dilemmas surrounding the concepts of self-determination, mandated treatment, HIV/Aids, child abuse, the right to die and class differences between the worker and the client.
Identify the emotional and physical symptoms and causes of professional burnout along with the methods designed to prevent it.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SWO 201  Domestic Violence: Impact on Individuals, Families and Communities  

This course is a one semester overview of the complexities underlying domestic violence in America, with a particular focus on Pennsylvania. Experts define domestic violence as behavioral patterns that are purposeful, often violent and used to maintain power and control over an intimate partner. Students will examine the historic and cultural context and expanded definition of domestic violence along with the current best practices to prevent and eliminate this problem. This course is designed to enhance the knowledge of students interested in the field of social work as they critically evaluate the complex overlapping of family dynamics, work place concerns and other social problems with the impact of physical, sexual, emotional, economic and psychological abuse. Special attention will be paid to the current best practices designed to assist children, individuals, families and communities with the goals of safety and self-determination.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define domestic violence, the cycle of violence and related concepts.
Identify and explain the roles of the perpetrator, victim and bystander.
Describe the support/benefits and limitations of the current legal and police responses to domestic violence incidents.
Identify governmental and social service agencies available to assist victims, perpetrators and bystanders.
Describe the structure, content and limitations of a professional helping relationship.
Identify local agencies and models of strength-based interventions and treatment practices.
Demonstrate how knowledge of oppression, privilege, culture, racism, institutional racism, stereotypes, discrimination, and ethnic identity relate to the skills necessary to perform the tasks of a culturally competent social worker.
Evaluate the ethical dilemmas surrounding the concept of self-determination and mandated-treatment as these relate to people who experience domestic violence.
Identify the emotional and physical symptoms and causes of professional burnout along with the methods designed to prevent it.

Prerequisites: ENG 100 and PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SWO 203  Counseling Skills  

This experiential course is a one-semester introduction to the basic skills used in the helping process. The course is designed for individuals pursuing a career in social work, or other related human service fields of study. The focus is on development, synthesis, analysis and demonstration of critical reasoning in the use of the core skills that facilitate effective and culturally responsive helping relationships. This course includes both didactic instruction and the development of basic techniques through frequent, applied counseling skills lab activities and written self reflection assignments.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the knowledge, values and skills of the Social Work or Psychology or Counseling profession at the introductory level and analyze the decisions made for use of certain counseling skills in practice lab activities.
Demonstrate the effective use of basic counseling skills for introductory practice.
Assess self-awareness by personal reflection and self-correction in periodic written personal evaluations showing the development of a professional identity and cultural competency.
Analyze and synthesize multiple sources of knowledge, including: prevention, intervention, theory, cultural competency and evaluation in the applied lab activities.
Demonstrate, in alignment with the NASW or APA or ACA Standards for Cultural Competency, the introductory level knowledge, values and counseling skills necessary to work from a strengths perspective with diverse populations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: ENG 100 and (PSY 140 or SWO 101).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SWO 210  Human Behavior and the Social Environment  

This course focuses on the internal and external variables that influences human development across the lifespan. Students will study the range of social systems in which people live, describe empirically-based knowledge of human behavior in the social environment, identify concepts, assumptions and critiques of developmental theories and assess the level of impact that diversity and socio-economic levels have on human development. In addition to exploring bio-psycho-social theories students will utilize social work conceptual frameworks to guide evaluation of existing case studies, programs, and interventions. Various constructs from the Social Work profession will be utilized throughout the course. These include but are not limited to: bio-psycho-social, Person in Environment (PIE), strengths-perspective, Problem Solving Process/Generalist Intervention Model, NASW Code of Ethics and systems theory. This course is a required course for the DCCC, Associate in Arts Degree in Social Work. NOTE: Students who are planning to transfer to a 4-year institution and complete a Bachelor of Social Work degree (BSW) are advised to plan early for transfer and meet with an advisor and transfer specialist.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe, compare and contrast empirically-based theories of human behavior in the social environment throughout the lifespan, including: the Person in Environment Perspective, strengths-perspective, Problem Solving Process/Generalist Intervention Model, NASW Code of Ethics, systems theory and bio-psycho-social contexts.
Demonstrate beginning knowledge of the various aspects of diversity and socio-economic levels that impact human development and behavior, including their own, by identifying concepts, assumptions and critiques of developmental theories related to all stages of life.
Assess client functioning within the social environment from various perspective, including the eco-system perspectives and explain how social institutions impact a client’s functioning in the dynamic environment over the lifespan.
Evaluate results from a client case study, published within an academic Social Work textbook or journal (or related discipline), by applying the theories presented in this course to the case study and describe the individual's functioning from an eco-systems perspective and how the interventions were used to support the client.
Identify concepts, assumptions and critiques of developmental theories related to the stages of life across the lifespan.
Utilize technology to access information.

Prerequisites: (SWO 101 or HUS 101) and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SWO 220  Social Welfare Policy  

This course is designed to prepare the beginning social work practitioner with an awareness of the range and complexity of problems addressed by the social welfare system. Students will gain knowledge of the historical development of social welfare programs, in the United States, and the evolution of these programs over time. Students will identify and examine their own attitudes and values toward social issues. Knowledge of the social work profession and its’ contributions to social policy development will also be examined within this framework. This course supports the introductory competencies of one of the four major-specific content areas of the TOAC-PA agreement for transfer and is a required course for the Associate of Arts in Social Work degree at Delaware County Community College. NOTE: Students who are planning to transfer to a 4 year institution and complete a Bachelor of Social Work degree (BSW) are advised to plan early for transfer and meet with a transfer advisor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the concept that the present social welfare system is a product of historical forces.
Develop an understanding of the history of social work as a profession and identify its values associated with social issues and related social policies.
Identify key existing social problems as they relate to vulnerable populations.
Demonstrate an awareness of how society has chosen to cope with and resolve a current social problem.
Identify, discuss and analyze key societal components and systems that have supported the systematic devaluation and discrimination toward certain groups in our society.
Examine one’s own attitudes and values as they relate to social issues.
Articulate directives from the Social Work Code of Ethics which relate to social issues and social welfare policies.
Explain what is meant by the Statement, “policy directs practice”.
Explain how poverty is defined and measured in the US.

Prerequisites: (SWO 101 or HUS 101) and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours