Academic Catalog

Emergency Services

The College Transfer Office is set up to help Delaware County Community College students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. If you are planning to transfer, you are strongly encouraged to meet with a transfer advisor within your first two semesters (or before you reach 30 transferable college credits from all institutions attended).

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degrees

Emergency Management and Planning (EMER)

The Emergency Management and Planning associate degree program is designed for individuals who are seeking careers that are related to management of emergency and catastrophic situations that are accidental, provoked or natural disasters. The primary focus of the program is to provide an educational vehicle and skill set for professionals such as Emergency Managers, Firefighters, Law Enforcement Officers or Medical or Allied Health personnel to approach emergency situations in a uniform fashion. The technical core of the program focuses on the knowledge and skills required to effectively manage and mitigate emergency and disaster incidents. Individuals employed in the private sector as safety officers or security professionals can also develop and strengthen their skills and effectiveness by completing this program. The competencies and course content has been developed with significant consideration of the coursework developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), state emergency management agencies and local emergency planning committees.

An Associate in Applied Science will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all courses.

Paramedic - Advanced Life Support (EMTP)

The Associate in Applied Science Degree: Paramedic - Advanced Life Support program is designed for individuals who are seeking careers as paramedics. Paramedic careers include 9-1-1 emergency response, inter-facility and critical care transport via ground and aero-medical vehicles. The primary focus of the program is to provide the education, skills and clinical experiences to best prepare the entry level paramedic. The National Emergency Medical Services Education Standards: Paramedic Instructional Guidelines were used in developing the competencies and course content for the Paramedic - Advanced Life Support degree program.

An Associate in Applied Science will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all AHESN courses.

JeffStat helicopter lands for training

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Municipal Police Academy (MPT)

All students successfully completing this certificate will earn thirty-six (36) credits, an ACT 120 certificate and be eligible to begin work as a Municipal Police Officer

Paramedic (MEDX)

The Paramedic, Certificate of Proficiency is designed for individuals who are seeking careers as paramedics. Paramedic careers include 9-1-1 emergency response, inter-facility and critical care transport via ground and aero-medical vehicles. The primary focus of the program is to provide the education, skills and clinical experiences to prepare the entry level paramedic for employment. The National Emergency Medical Services Education Standards: Paramedic Instructional Guidelines were used in developing the competencies and course content.

A certificate will be awarded upon completion of the program with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all program courses.

Trauma Studies (TSC)

The Trauma Studies 15-25 college-credit certificate program provides students, paraprofessionals, and professionals with the skills to recognize trauma and understand trauma outcomes and societal response to trauma, across disciplines.

A Certificate of Competency in Trauma Studies will be awarded upon completion of this curriculum with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all five Trauma Studies courses.

View full A-Z Course List

EMER - Emergency Management and Planning

EMER 105  Incident Management  

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the Incident Command-Unified Command Structure. Additionally, a look at incident management from various perspectives such as local fire departments, industrial settings, the Oklahoma City bombing, and others will be discussed. The student will work in an interactive program to prepare for future roles and responsibilities as those charged with a management role in incident command, control or mitigation. Moreover, the student will learn from the experiences of others, sharpening their understanding and skills relative to the dimensions of emergency incident management.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the terms and regulatory framework of incident management.
Identify the roles and responsibilities associated with incident management.
Differentiate between Incident Command and Unified Command.
Recognize the need for, and the role of, various functionaries in the incident management system.
Define the terms "teamwork" and "cooperation" in incident management.
Identify the consequences of a poor or ineffective incident management structure.
Recognize the need for, and use of, incident management.
Describe how incident management is applied in various emergencies.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

EMER 110  Emergency Planning  

This course will introduce the student to the concepts of Emergency and Crisis Planning. The course provides an overview of the entire concept of planning as an activity to anticipate, prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from any incident. Through a dynamic process, the course will break down the planning process into understandable parts such as hazard analysis, resource assessment, plan development, coordination with others, and plan implementation training and education. In addition, the student will work in an interactive program to establish a planning process for their company or municipality. The student will learn from the experiences and circumstances of others while sharpening their understanding and skills relative to the dimensions of Emergency Planning and Management.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the terms and regulatory framework of emergency planning.
Identify the roles and responsibilities associated with the planning process.
Differentiate between "Emergency Planning" and "Emergency Management".
Recognize the need for Emergency Planning and the role of various functionaries in the process.
Define the terms "teamwork" and "cooperation" in emergency planning.
Identify the pitfalls of a poor or ineffective emergency planning system.
Recognize the need for, and the use of, emergency planning.
Describe how emergency planning affects emergency preparedness, response and recovery.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

EMER 120  Leadership and Influence  

This course will provide the student with an overview of the theories and concepts of leadership development. The course will examine leadership from a value (core values) approach, systems (chain of command) approach, a functional approach, and a skills approach (motivation, supervision, and communications). In addition, the student will study the process approach by looking at leadership as a process of influencing an organization/group to achieve goals.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the terms "leadership" and "influence" relative to emergency response.
Identify the roles and responsibilities associated with leadership.
Differentiate between leadership and ego.
Identify the need for, and the role of, leadership in the incident management system.
Define the terms "teamwork" and "cooperation" relative to leadership and influence in emergency response.
Identify the consequences of poor or ineffective leadership in an emergency.
Recognize what it takes to be influential and the need for influence in certain circumstances.
Describe how leadership can influence people, their response to activities, their safety and their future leadership styles.

Prerequisites: EMER 105 or EMS 204.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

EMER 130  Search and Rescue  

This course will provide the student with the knowledge concerning the general responsibilities, skills, abilities and the equipment needed by those involved in search and rescue efforts. The course also provides the student with practical exercises and search missions where they are required to utilize the proper equipment. The contents of the course include topics in three major areas: survival, support, and search and rescue. Additionally, the student is provided with an excellent opportunity to discuss and investigate the role of search and rescue in relation to incident management as well as the roles and responsibilities of search and rescue leaders. Students will learn from the experiences of others to sharpen their understanding and skills relative to search and rescue.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the components of search and rescue operations and resources.
List the major responsibilities for search and rescue.
Describe the components of Incident Command System (ICS) and their functions.
Differentiate between at least three types of maps used in search and rescue.
Identify the use of topographical maps.
Define the plotting methods or grid systems.
Describe the parts of the compass.
Utilize a compass.
Define the six crucial steps in search and rescue management.
Differentiate between the two basic categories of search tactics (Passive and Active).
Describe the primary types of active search tactics.
Describe the techniques and methods used by searchers.
List searching or tactical skills needed by field searchers.
Explain why knowledge of lost person behavior can be an advantage to the searcher.

Prerequisites: EMER 105 or EMS 204.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

EMER 140  Emergency Management Seminar  

This course will provide the student with a forum for discussion of the basic need for emergency management, emergency planning and incident management. This course will also overview the roles and responsibilities of the Incident Safety Officer in preparation for a series of response drills to implement student knowledge in these areas. In addition, a functional exercise will be conducted to test the course outcomes and competencies.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the application of the various roles and responsibilities in incident management.
Identify the roles and responsibilities associated with incident management.
Identify the difference between Incident Command and Unified Command.
Define the roles of various functionaries in the incident management system.
Define the terms "teamwork" and "cooperation" in incident management.
Evaluate hazards and risks associated with emergency response operations.
Correct hazardous conditions associated with emergency response operations.
Identify and correct unsafe acts that are observed during functional exercises as they apply to recognized standards provided by fire, police, medical and hazardous material regulations.
Develop a plan of action to reduce or alleviate hazards.
Implement a plan of action to reduce or alleviate hazards.

Prerequisites: EMER 105 or EMS 204.

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

EMS - Emergency Medical Services

EMS 100  Emergency Medical Technician  

This intensive program is designed to instruct the pre-hospital care provider in the skills necessary to reduce mortality and morbidity from accident and illness. Topics covered include patient assessment, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical aids to ventilation, trauma management, head, neck and spinal injuries, fractures, medical and environmental emergencies, crisis intervention and vehicle rescue. NOTE Co-requisites: FEMA Incident Command System Levels IS100 and IS700. Ten patient assessment contacts

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Control hazards present to self, victim and bystanders at the scene of a pre-hospital medical emergency situation.
Assess extent of injury to victims suffering pre-hospital accident or illness.
Recognize and provide appropriate emergency care to victims suffering cardiac arrest and/or airway obstruction.
Assess and provide adequate emergency care for victims suffering trauma to one or more body systems.
Communicate patient care information in an effective professional manner both verbally and in writing.
Assess cardiac, respiratory, diabetic and associated medical and environmental emergencies.
Evaluate obstetrical emergencies and provide appropriate assistance and/or emergency intervention to the expectant female.

Prerequisites: (REA 050 or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 040 or MAT 050). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

9 Credits7 Weekly Lecture Hours
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP - EMT Paramedic

EMTP 100  Introduction and Patient Assessment  

This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of advanced life support systems and procedures. Topics such as medical/legal ethics and drug information will be presented. Experiments and case studies will be presented. It will also provide the student with theory, concepts and the applications necessary to measure the pre-hospital scene and its surroundings. Additionally, the student will be able to prioritize care based on patient assessment, which includes body substance isolation, scene safety, recognition and stabilization of life-threatening conditions, identification of patients who require rapid stabilization and transportation for definitive care. NOTE Requirements:: Current Pennsylvania Emergency Medical Technician certification. Students currently certified (without restrictions or administrative actions) by National Registry Emergency Medical Technician must also obtain a Pennsylvania EMT certification; Current Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation certification issued by an approved third party accreditation body as identified by the PA Bureau of Emergency Medical Services; Successful completion of physical examination (including drug screening) performed by the students physician using the physical form provided by DCCC; Clear Pennsylvania State Police criminal background check as mandated by PA Bureau of EMS; Clear child abuse clearance as mandated by the PA Bureau of EMS; Clear FBI background clearance including fingerprinting; Clear criminal background from state of residence.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems as they relate to history, system development, education, research and continuous quality improvement.
Describe the individual’s role in providing emergency patient care.
Outline the individual’s role in promoting community health education, wellness and prevention.
Identify professional, ethical, legal and moral accountability issues and situations.
Identify the components of patient assessment and examination.
Identify life-threatening conditions.
Outline effective patient communication techniques.
Apply interventions as identified during patient assessment.
Identify priorities of management of the medical and traumatic patient.
Effectively provide current and on-going patient care.
Recognize changes in assessment and apply appropriate interventions as indicated.
Identify communication strategies necessary to collect information, interview and assess patients.

6 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 6 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 101  Pharmacology and Airway Management  

This course is designed to stress practices applicable to the paramedic practitioner. Emphasis is placed on medication application, pharmacology and therapeutic concepts and practices. Various approaches are covered to ensure that the student receives broad exposure to all areas required for the paramedic practitioner. Experiments and case studies will be presented during this course. The student will utilize the knowledge of anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system to examine the mechanics of respiration, gases, regulation of respiration, foreign body airway obstructions and airway evaluation. In addition, the student will study the essential parameters of airway evaluation, airway management, and airway procedures. NOTE Requirement: Certification as a current Emergency Medical Technician and current CPR provider; Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the components of human anatomy and physiology as they relate to care for the sick or injured.
Identify the proper use and administration of drugs for various body systems.
Explain pharmacological characteristics, mathematical principles, and purpose in administering pharmacological agents.
Identify communication strategies necessary to collect information, interview and assess patients.
Discuss the assessment and management of the respiratory system.
Identify the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory systems.
Describe variations in assessment and management of the respiratory system.
Outline the mechanics of the respiratory system.
Describe the regulation of the respiratory system.
Describe devices and techniques in the management of the respiratory patient.
Describe conditions and complications associated with the respiratory system.
Utilize pharmacological agents in management of the respiratory system.
Utilize manual and mechanical interventions in management of the respiratory system.
Distinguish between respiration, pulmonary ventilation, and external and internal respiration.
Describe pulmonary circulation.
Describe voluntary, chemical and nervous regulation of respiration.
Outline essential parameters to evaluate the effectiveness of airway and breathing.
Describe the indications, contraindications, and techniques for supplemental oxygen delivery.
Discuss methods for patient ventilation.
Describe the assessment techniques and devices used to ensure adequate oxygenation.

Prerequisites: EMTP 100.

6 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 6 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 102  Trauma Assessment and Management  

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills to recognize the mechanisms of injury, trauma systems, patient assessment and emergency care. The course will also cover, in detail, the importance of length of time that elapses between the incident and definitive care. Additionally, the course addresses the major roles in death reduction in three periods of trauma: through community education, scene interventions, and rapid response. Trauma systems, appreciation of comprehensive trauma systems, blunt trauma, and penetrating trauma will be thoroughly discussed. NOTE Requirement: Certification as a current Emergency Medical Technician and current CPR provider; Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the incidence and scope of traumatic injuries and deaths.
Identify the role of each component of the trauma system.
Predict injury patterns based upon knowledge of the laws of physics related to forces involved in trauma.
Describe the injury patterns that should be suspected when injury occurs from blunt trauma.
Describe the role of restraints in injury prevention and the injury patterns.
Discuss how an organ’s motion may contribute to injury in each body region depending on the forces applied.
Identify selected injury patterns associated with motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) collisions.
Describe injury patterns associated with pedestrian collisions.
Identify injury patterns associated with sports injuries, blast injuries and vertical falls.
Describe factors that influence tissue damage related to penetrating injuries.
Attain certification in Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support.

Prerequisites: EMTP 101.

5 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 103  Cardiology  

This course is designed to prepare the paramedic student to manage numerous types of cardiology emergencies. Topics including the etiology and epidemiology of cardiopulmonary diseases and conditions will be discussed as well as the means of identifying and describing the function of cardiopulmonary system. NOTE Requirement: Certification as a current Emergency Medical Technician and CPR provider; Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the risk factors and prevention education of cardiovascular disease processes.
Distinguish pathophysiology of respiratory emergencies related to ventilation, diffusion, and perfusion.
Assess causes, complications, and conditions of the cardiopulmonary system.
Describe the anatomy and physiology of the cardiopulmonary system.
Identify the electrophysiology of the cardiac system.
Describe cardiovascular disease processes.
Distinguish among varied techniques in managing cardiac and pulmonary emergencies.
Apply emergency intervention on patients suffering from cardiopulmonary conditions.
Attain certification in Advance Cardiac Life Support.

Prerequisites: EMTP 101.

Corequisites: EMTP 102 and EMTP 104 and EMTP 105.

4 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 104  Medical Assessment and Management  

This course is designed to prepare the paramedic student to manage numerous types of medical emergencies. This course will provide the student with information necessary to effectively perform in medical emergency situations pertaining to neurology, hematology, endocrinology, allergy, anaphylaxis, gastroenterology, urology and toxicology. NOTE Requirements: Certification as a current Emergency Medical Technician and CPR provider; Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.
Identify disorders of the nervous, endocrine, and gastro-urinary systems.
Identify neurological disorders.
Describe causative agents and the pathophysiology of ingested poisons.
Assess acute abdominal pain.
Specify disorders of the endocrine system.
Describe the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine glands that assist the body in the maintenance of homeostasis.
Describe the antigen antibody response.
Describe signs and symptoms and management of allergic reactions.
Describe signs and symptoms, complications, and pre-hospital management of gastrointestinal disorders.
Distinguish between poisoning by ingestion, inhalation, and injection.
Recognize conditions relating to drug and alcohol abuse.
Identify key structures and normal functions of the urinary system.
Describe detailed pathophysiology and assessment of urinary system disorders.
Identify abdominal and genitourinary disorders, acute abdominal pain and systemic illnesses.
Apply management and treatment priorities for toxic syndromes.
Discuss the pathophysiology of blood and hematological disorders.
Apply the theory of thermoregulation to various patient presentations.

Prerequisites: EMTP 101.

Corequisites: EMTP 102 and EMTP 103 and EMTP 105.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 105  Clinical Rotations I  

This course is an incorporation of the skills and practices that each student will need to accomplish during the in hospital clinical sessions. The clinical document required by the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP) outlines the specific encounters with the patient that each student must successfully achieve during clinical and hospital sessions. In addition, topics such as intravenous medications bolus through intravenous line, communicating, relaying patient information, and trauma including hospital procedures will be covered. NOTE: Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Perform a comprehensive identification, assessment and management of a variety of advanced life support patients in the in-hospital setting.
Demonstrate knowledge of communication systems for reporting patient care and interventions.
Demonstrate appropriate patient communication techniques.
Document all patient assessments and advanced life support interventions accurately for patients in a variety of in-patient and out-patient clinical settings.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for pediatric patients.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for psychiatric patients.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for trauma patients.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for intensive care unit and intermediate care patients.

Prerequisites: EMTP 101.

Corequisites: EMTP 102 and EMTP 103 and EMTP 104.

2 Credits
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 200  Summative Field Clinical  

Summative Field Clinical is a Capstone course. Students will enroll in this course only after demonstrating skill and knowledge in the didactic and laboratory components of the program. Students will perform and manage an effective assessment of the patient. The student will learn the appropriate procedures to gather evaluate and synthesize information as well as make appropriate decisions based on that information and be able to take the necessary action for patient care. The student will be expected to achieve proficiency by performing these skills on actual patients in a clinical setting. Integrating pathophysiological principles, physical examination findings, formulating a field impression and implementing treatment for the patient with common complaints will be practiced during this time. Alternative learning experiences (simulations, programmed patient scenarios, etc.) will be available as needed. Proficiency in performing all steps and procedures safely and properly will be thoroughly evaluated. NOTE Requirement: Certification as a current Emergency Medical Technician and CPR provider; Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate and discuss how assessment-based management contributes to effective patient and scene assessment.
Demonstrate and describe factors that affect assessment and decision making in the pre-hospital setting.
Demonstrate the proper application and performance of basic life support skills.
Demonstrate safe practices in the pre-hospital environment.
Recognize the need of advanced life support interventions.
Outline effective techniques for scene and patient assessment and choreography of patient assessment and personnel management.
Identify and utilize essential take-in equipment for general and selected patient situations.
Outline strategies that promote an effective patient encounter.
Describe techniques that permit efficient and accurate presentation of the patient.
Demonstrate the ability to serve as a team leader in a variety of pre-hospital emergency responses.
Demonstrate proper performance of advanced life support procedures and skills.
Apply the appropriate advanced life support skills in an emergency situation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: EMTP 102 and EMTP 103 and EMTP 104 and EMTP 105.

Corequisites: EMTP 201 and EMTP 205.

8 Credits0 Weekly Lecture Hours
 16 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 201  Operations and Special Patient Populations  

This course is designed to provide the student with information necessary to effectively perform in specific medical emergency situations. Infectious diseases, disease transmission pathways, behavioral and psychiatric illnesses, obstetrical and gynecological emergencies and rescue operations will be covered. NOTE Requirement: Certification as a current Emergency Medical Technician and CPR provider; Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish among the recognition, transmission, and pathophysiology of infectious diseases.
Discuss the paramedic’s role in the prevention of disease transmission.
Discuss the critical principles of behavior emergencies.
Identify potential causes of behavioral and psychiatric illnesses.
Distinguish varied methods of approaching violent and non-violent patients (adult or child).
Describe the physiology of menstruation and ovulation.
Describe the structure and function of processes during pregnancy.
Describe detailed assessment and management of obstetrical and gynecological emergencies.
Discussion and demonstration of rescue operations.
Attain certification in Pediatric Advanced Life Support.

Prerequisites: EMTP 102 and EMTP 103 and EMTP 104.

Corequisites: EMTP 200 and EMTP 205.

4 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

EMTP 205  Clinical Rotations II  

This course addresses skills and practices each student needs to successfully complete during the in-hospital clinical sessions. The clinical document required by the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP) outlines the specific encounters with the patient that each student must successfully achieve during clinical and hospital sessions. In addition, topics such as intravenous medication bolus through intravenous line, communicating, relaying patient information, and trauma will be experienced, as well as numerous in hospital miscellaneous procedures. NOTE: Pre-requisites must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Perform a comprehensive identification, assessment and management of a variety of advanced life support patients in the in-hospital.
Demonstrate knowledge of communication systems for reporting patient care and interventions.
Demonstrate appropriate patient communication techniques.
Document all patient assessments and advanced life support interventions accurately for patients in a variety of in-patient and out-patient clinical settings.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for pediatric patients.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for maternity patients.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for labor and delivery patients.
Demonstrate appropriate assessment, communications and management for burn patients.

Prerequisites: EMTP 102 and EMTP 103 and EMTP 104 and EMTP 105.

Corequisites: EMTP 200 and EMTP 201.

2 Credits0 Weekly Lecture Hours
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

FST - Fire Science Technology

FST 100  Introduction to Fire Protection  

A course in the history and development of fire protection. Topics covered are the role of the fire service in the development of civilization; personnel in fire protection; general introduction to fire hazards; and a discussion of the problems and possible solutions for current and future fire protection.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the operation of the major sprinkler systems employed in residential and commercial sites.
Explain the internal operation of a fire pump, and the pump's relationship to the engine and transmission.
Explain the accumulation, storage, purification and distribution of water for domestic and fire-fighting use.
Describe proper fire alarm protection for residential buildings, including single family dwellings, dormitories and high-rise apartment buildings.
Explain the safe operation of an aerial ladder truck when used as a rescue tool or water tower and when being used for routine work.
Explain the safe operation of an articulated boom when used as a rescue tool or water tower and when being used for routine work.
Construct a disaster plan for their municipality that would be used in the event of conflagration, airplane crash, flood or other disaster.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 101  Principles of Fire Science Administration  

Fire-Science Administration details the skills and techniques necessary for proper management of all aspects of fire service.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Delineate the scope of management principles.
Apply managerial functions to various positions in fire service.
Explicate behavioral science aspects in management application.
Direct managerial skills to achieve organizational needs.
Assess a management-by-objective program in a fire service.
Detail the objectives of fire prevention and the fire-inspection process.
Outline and use pre-fire planning.
Describe personnel management.
Depict sound training techniques for fire personnel.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 102  Fire Prevention Theory and Application  

This course is designed to cover the basics of the development of fire-prevention laws and ordinances for elimination of fire hazards, inspection, organization, practices and procedures. Theory and application of laws and ordinances in modern concepts of fire prevention are also covered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Organize a viable fire-prevention program.
Trace the development of the science of fire prevention.
Explicate the Fire Prevention Code.
Conduct a thorough fire safety program.
Maintain accurate records and reports via the Systems Analysis method.
Use the Life Safety Code properly, including its means of egress and physical features.
Apply the Life Safety Code regulations to the institutional, residential, mercantile and industrial areas.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 103  Fire and Arson Investigation  

This course enables students to become familiar with the problems inherent in determining the causes of fires, recognition of arson, preservation of evidence and successful prosecution of those responsible.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Organize a viable fire-prevention program.
Trace the development of the science of fire prevention.
Explicate the Fire Prevention Code.
Conduct a thorough fire safety program.
Maintain accurate records and reports via the Systems Analysis method.
Use the Life Safety Code properly, including its means of egress and physical features.
Apply the Life Safety Code regulations to the institutional, residential, mercantile and industrial areas.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 200  Fire Operation Strategies  

This course entails the various tactics and strategies involved in extinguishing fires. Emphasis is on the development of skills in analyzing and reacting to crises.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Detail the general rules of safety and cite the most common deficiencies.
Detail proper operating functions of engine and ladder companies at the fire scene.
Evaluate fire conditions and select effective hoseline placement, proper methods of ventilation, use of fog and appropriate safety measures.
Explicate procedures used in fighting major fires, fires in buildings under construction and fires in various types of buildings.
Delineate the procedures for post-fire analysis in order to improve performance.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 201  Fire Protection in Building Construction  

This course is designed to expose students to the various types of building construction and the fire problems (including building collapse) of each.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
List the six common types of construction used in this area.
Explicate the shifting of the various types of loads in a building during fire situations.
Detail the appropriate methods of fire fighting for the various types of wood, siding, sheathing, masonry, concrete and steel buildings.
Recognize and cite approved fire-fighting techniques for the various types of voids inherent in buildings.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 202  Fire Systems in Industry  

This course is designed to acquaint students with the various aspects of private fire protection, from designing the physical facilities to instituting safety factors to extinguishing conflagrations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Assess occupational opportunities in industrial fire protection.
Delineate the management responsibilities concerning property conservation.
Detail the traits needed in and responsibilities of a director of property conservation.
Depict the procedures required to begin a property conservation program.
Provide the minimal functions required of the plant emergency organization.
Establish a viable watch service.
Classify the various types and components of sprinkler systems.
Describe the advantages of each of the four basic types of alarm systems.
Preplan for the normal property conservation emergency situations.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FST 220  Seminar Fire Science  

This course is designed for advanced students and presents a series of topics only occasionally encountered. Much of the material is supplemental to previous course work. Students are expected to present a research project to the class. NOTE: Pre-Requisite 6 cr. in Fire Science.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the specific extinguishing properties of water, foam, concentrates and inert gases.
Explicate procedures involved in electrical fires.
Detail the types and legal aspects of fire alarm systems.
Provide guidelines for fire operations at high-rise emergencies.
Plan effective and motivating ongoing training for fire personnel.
Delineate appropriate administrative techniques of budgeting, record keeping and preplanning for diverse emergency situations.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT - Municipal Police Training

MPT 100  Introduction to Law Enforcement  

This course teaches the police candidate the role of a police officer in the community. It defines police power and authority, the potential impact of its misuse on the community as well as social control. Understanding the function of the police within the context of the United States Constitution will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explicate the social control of police behavior.
Describe and apply principles of police discretionary conduct.
Analyze and describe the role of personal and professional conduct.
Describe the place of police in our society.
Show the relationship of police conduct to an ethical code.
Detail the difference between civil and criminal behavior.
Describe the role of public and community relations in police work.
Delineate the role of law and administration of law in our society.
Depict penology in Pennsylvania.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 101  Professional Development  

This course teaches appropriate skills for the maintenance of mental and physical well-being and appropriate professional standards of conduct. It provides relevant theory and instruction numerous areas such as the elements of physical fitness and its relationship to police work. Moreover, the physical and psychological benefits of physical fitness and the importance of establishing a healthy lifestyle in specific areas of physical training, nutrition and weight control will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the use of force continuum and explain its levels, constraints and cues.
Identify circumstances where use of non-deadly force is authorized by law.
Identify circumstances where use of deadly force is authorized by law.
Demonstrate techniques used to subdue persons using locks, grips, holds, etc.
Describe stress-inducing situations that can affect the conduct of individual police officers.
Depict police leadership traits and techniques.
Analyze psychological barriers to confrontation by police of their own emotional and psychological problems.
Describe the effect on an officer's emotional state when exercising police power and authority.
Demonstrate physical conditioning by performing push-ups, sit-ups, and a mile and one-half run, weight-lifting and sit-and-reach exercises.

4 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

MPT 102  Law and Procedures  

This course teaches the police officer candidate to recognize and cite Pennsylvania criminal statutes, the rules of criminal procedures and applicable Constitutional provisions. Distinctions between criminal and civil law, federal, state and local statutes will be thoroughly addressed. In addition, topics of discussion will include, but will not be limited to, understanding the basic laws and rules that govern the power, authority, and jurisdiction of police officers in Pennsylvania.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the US.
and Pennsylvania Constitution provisions that provide the legal basis for the exercise of police power.
Provide the legal basis for the exercise of police power.
Recognize and cite provisions of Pennsylvania statutes that define criminal conduct.
Apply rules and statutory provisions for arrest, search warrants, electronic surveillance and bail.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 103  Law and Procedures II  

This course is a continuation of Law and Procedures I which teaches the police officer candidate to recognize and cite Pennsylvania criminal statute, the rules of criminal procedures and applicable Constitutional provisions. Instruction in this course will be on theory and skills associated with the significant steps in the arrest, post-arrest, pretrial, trial and post-trial processes.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize and cite provisions of the Mental Health Act, Protection from Abuse Act, Liquor Control Act, and Crime Victims Compensation Act.
Identify major provisions of the Controlled Substance Act pertinent to their enforcement capacity.
Identify the major provisions of the cell phone laws.
Recognize provisions of environmental laws, safety concerns, and jurisdictional issues.
Identify circumstances when a search incident to arrest is authorized.
Describe a suppression hearing.
Identify ethical considerations in search and seizure.
Identify consequences of conducting an unlawful search.
Define the legal requirements to search a person, house, etc.
Define a lawful frisk.

Prerequisites: MPT 102.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 104  Vehicle Code  

This course is designed to provide the student with relevant theory and skills in analyzing the provisions of the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code and decisions of operating under the influence detection. Sources of standards for armed pedestrian behavior and the function of law enforcement within the context of the highway transportation system will be defined.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply appropriate provisions of the Motor Vehicle Code to specific factual situations.
Demonstrate procedures for breath, urine and/or chemical tests to determine the presence of alcohol or controlled substances.
Differentiate applicable provisions of the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code and the Criminal Code.
Detail the role of PennDOT and traffic safety enforcement.
Cite provisions of the Motor Vehicle Code for issuing citations and arresting individuals for code violations.

2 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 105  Motor Vehicle Collision Inspection and Related Issues  

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the relationship of the cause and analysis of vehicle collisions. Proper identification and documentation of physical evidence as it relates to collisions upon the highway, as well as collision scene, traffic direction and control will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define reportable and non-reportable, traffic and non-traffic motor vehicle collisions.
Perform the proper sequence of action at collision scene.
Recognize appropriate legal requirements pertaining to the need to complete state traffic collision reports.
Utilize proper search technique for physical evidence at collision scene.
Specify proper method for measuring skid marks based on type and extent of skid.
Identify the term hazardous materials.
Define why hazardous materials are a problem and who has to deal with them.
Apply PennDOT basic safety guidelines.

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

MPT 106  Patrol Procedures and Operations  

This course presents the principles of police patrol procedures and operations as the foundation at any police department. It introduces the student to the mental preparation necessary to effectively perform duties and function as a patrol officer.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply standard accepted principles of police patrol.
Detail incident procedures for vehicular accidents and violations as well as apprehension of suspects.
Specify arrest, impounding, and security procedures applicable to patrol activities.
Define human relations skills applicable to patrol procedures.
Delineate Miranda warnings requirements.
Identify purposes and procedures for safe roadblocks.
Identify markings and colors common to gangs in Pennsylvania.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 107  Principles of Criminal Investigation  

This course is designed to present basic principles of criminal procedures. It defines the role of a responding officer at the scene of a police event as well as, demonstrates the technical capacity to effectively conduct crime scene management preliminary investigations and other patrol-related investigations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define a preliminary investigation.
Identify the general unreliability of eyewitness identification and steps to make such identifications more reliable.
Coordinate and apply methods of establishing value of stolen and recovered property.
Demonstrate proper procedures for conducting the initial investigation of rape, sexual assault, and sex crimes.
Recognize the most common forms of drugs.
Define proper surveillance techniques.
Apply principles of preliminary, crime site and follow-up investigation.
List applicable rules of evidence.
Detail applicable procedures to protect crime sites and to preserve evidence.
Perform principles of interview and interrogation.
Differentiate criminal investigation from civil investigation.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 200  Human Relations  

This course introduces the basic principles by which students can improve their observation skills and perceptions of human behavior. Other topics addressed are sensitivity issues and how people react to authority. The importance of understanding cultural differences and ethnic intermediation will be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
List and describe basic universal aspects of the communication process.
Identify the impact of role awareness, reference groups and motivation of human behavior.
Apply proper procedures for conducting initial investigation of bias/hate crimes.
Process legal requirements regarding emergency detention of a mentally ill person.
Categorize necessary information to be presented in an oral statement.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 202  Crisis Management  

This course enhances the students ability to make judgments and understand the various elements of juvenile crime and the juvenile criminal justice system. To enable students to understand how to bring a dispute under control will be defined. This course will also teach behavioral skills necessary for the successful and positive resolution of dispute situations. The ability to identify and learn the necessary skills for conflict management will be thoroughly addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply Constitutional and other legal requirements for arresting an individual or taking the individual into custody.
Specify and demonstrate procedures required for arrest of individuals and for searches of those taken into custody.
Delineate unique problems involved in the detention of mentally ill, emotionally unstable and physically handicapped individuals.
Describe and apply principles for use of force in arrest and custody situations.
List procedures for extricating hostages and responding to prisoner escapes.
Identify proper safety procedures before entering a dispute.
Identify the scope of and the authority of the Juvenile Court.
Define juvenile delinquent, child in need of supervision and runaway.
Define elements of the Domestic Violence Act.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 204  Firearms  

This course is designed to teach police officer candidates the fundamentals of proper use of firearms. The course incorporates application of the tactical and decision-making skills necessary for them to apply this critical skill in actual situations to protect themselves and the public from harm.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply safety rules when using firearms.
Illustrate proper procedures for use of pistols, shotguns and holsters.
Define deadly and non-deadly force applications.
Identify basic principles of ballistics.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 205  Operation of Patrol Vehicles  

This course is designed to teach the skills necessary for safe operation of police vehicles. Students will be well-versed in the control and handling of an emergency response vehicle. Mastery of the principles of safe driving coupled with refinement in driving skills under adverse and simulated emergency conditions will sharpen the students driving reactions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Operate police vehicles under normal and emergency circumstances.
Describe and analyze an officers responsibilities for civil and/or criminal penalty in case of police vehicle accident.
Demonstrate skills for safe driving and pursuit of fleeing individuals or vehicles.
Detail proper vehicle protection systems.

2 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 206  Report Writing and Case Preparation  

This course is designed to teach and demonstrate evaluation techniques for accurately recording an incident report. The course enables students to identify the characteristics essential to a good report as well as check for completeness and accuracy.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply techniques of listening and one-on-one communication.
Apply rules to prepare police officers as witnesses.
Illustrate written reports and note-taking skills.
Demonstrate public communication as a police officer through prepared speeches, testimony, and extemporaneous talks.
Perform proper procedures of notification to a victims family of death or injury.
Specify communication techniques for emergency notification.
Identify characteristics as essential to a good report.
Define the purpose of the law of evidence.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 207  Emergency Response Training  

This course trains the police officer candidate to provide immediate emergency care prior to arrival of paramedical aid to the site. It provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to work as a first responder in an emergency to help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until additional medical help arrives.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply principles of emergency medical care to crisis situations.
List emergency medical problems confronted by police officers.
Detail procedures for obstetrical emergencies.
Stipulate procedures for care of AIDS patients and protection of officers.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 208  Handling Arrested Persons  

This course introduces the police officer candidate to emergency case management of disorderly mentally ill, criminal or psychologically distraught individuals. The course also covers officer safety and strategy in preparing and pre-planning in an arrest. In addition, it familiarizes the student with the parts and operational mechanisms and use of handcuffs and teaches safe and efficient transport of individuals placed in custody.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe various violent and dangerous situations, more particularly those involving domestic disputes, mentally ill individuals, and violent criminals.
Recognize and describe mental illness.
Detail suicide and hostage-taking events.
Analyze and apply principles of response to dangerous, potentially dangerous, or hostile crisis situations.
Apply proper procedures to conduct field search of arrested persons.
Identify proper procedure to handcuff suspects or prisoners.

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

TSC - Trauma Studies

TSC 230  Recognizing Trauma  

This course provides students with a foundation in understanding trauma. Multiple cross-cultural definitions of trauma will be considered. The course explores the causes of trauma, including but not limited to domestic and community violence, mass shootings, school shootings, war, sexual assault and harassment, child sexual abuse, physical abuse, neglect, accidents, natural disasters, suicide, and other traumatic loss. Students will understand the symptoms related to traumatic reactions, across physical, neurobiological, cognitive, behavioral, emotional, social, and developmental domains. Techniques for hypothetically assessing trauma will be explored. NOTE: Pre-Requisite: In addition to PSY 140, students must have completed at least one Trauma Studies program elective.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define trauma through various cross-cultural perspectives.
Identify primary causes of trauma.
Recognize the symptoms associated with traumatic reactions.
Examine rates of different types of trauma and identify reliable sources for current data.
Develop a hypothetical plan for trauma assessment.
Demonstrate proficiency in accessing, interpreting, and communicating findings from trauma-related research.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

TSC 236  Trauma Outcomes and Societal Response  

This course provides students with an understanding of traumatic reactions to prepare professionals to respond to those suffering after a traumatic event compassionately and effectively, across clinical and non-clinical settings, so that interventions support prevention, resilience, and treatment. Common trauma outcomes will be discussed. Clinically, diagnosis and treatment options will be reviewed with an emphasis on crisis intervention and evidence-based treatments. Non-clinically, trauma-sensitive considerations and interventions will be discussed systemically, across families, communities, and the workplace. Legal and ethical issues surrounding trauma will be reviewed. The course will highlight protective and risk factors that increase/decrease traumatic reactions and review the experiences of posttraumatic growth and resiliency in the face of trauma. Students will understand the potential of shock, desensitization, burnout, vicarious trauma, and compassion fatigue among professionals and will be able to recognize the importance of professionals’ self-care.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize common trauma outcomes.
Identify clinical diagnostic options and evidence-based clinical prevention and intervention strategies.
Non-clinically, recognize trauma-sensitive considerations across systems and related legal and ethical issues.
Highlight protective and risk factors for trauma.
Relate traumatic reactions to posttraumatic growth and resiliency.
Recognize vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue and the importance of helpers’ self-care.

Prerequisites: TSC 230.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours