Academic Catalog

Liberal Arts

The College Transfer Office is set up to help Delaware County Community College students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. If you are planning to transfer, you are strongly encouraged to meet with a transfer advisor within your first two semesters (or before you reach 30 transferable college credits from all institutions attended).

Associate in Arts (AA) Degrees

English (ENG)

The A.A. in English has been designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year institution and earn a bachelor’s degree in English. This degree is comprised of core Liberal Arts courses and English electives which are intended to provide students with the necessary foundation to be successful in more advanced courses. Students in this program are strongly encouraged to consult with their English advisor and a transfer counselor for appropriate guidance in the choice of their electives.

Liberal Arts (LA)

The Liberal Arts curriculum provides the core liberal arts component of most bachelor’s degree programs and prepares students for transfer to four-year colleges or universities. The interdisciplinary curriculum is well-suited for students who are either undecided about their major or who are seeking a broad, general education before narrowing the focus of their course of study. After completing this program, students will be well-positioned to pursue any number of different Bachelor of Arts programs at four-year institutions. Since curriculum requirements of other institutions vary, students should meet with a transfer advisor at DCCC to obtain information concerning entrance requirements for the specific school and program in which they are interested.

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degrees

General Studies (GEN)

The General Studies program is designed for those students who wish to earn an associate in applied science degree which meets the College’s Academic Learning Goals and allows the maximum flexibility in course selection. Students who wish to broaden their cultural backgrounds or increase their understanding of global issues and concerns may choose to select this program. Students who were previously awarded a certificate of competency or proficiency may be permitted to apply those college level credits to this program. While General Studies is not designed to be a transfer program, careful course selection can facilitate transfer to another academic program or institution. General Studies may not be awarded as part of a dual degree.

Depending on a student’s interest in either a particular field of study or a specific four-year transfer institution, it is recommended that 18 credits within the General Studies program be devoted to aiding the student either in developing his/her knowledge in that field of study or in achieving seamless transfer to a four-year college. Students may elect to take 3 or 6 credits through the college’s Co-Op/Internship Program (CSEL). Students should meet with their advisors and/or transfer counselor to determine which courses best meets their goals for this focused concentration of study.

Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) Degrees

Creative Writing

This curriculum is designed for students who wish to hone their skills in the field of creative writing. Students will develop their craft in fundamental and advanced level courses necessary to become competent practitioners, ultimately pursuing concentrations in poetry, play/screenwriting, memoir or short story writing. This program serves students who are firmly committed to pursuing careers in which creative writing is the foundational element. While students in English courses utilize literacy artifacts as occasions to exercise critical thought, students pursuing this degree concern themselves with the production of literacy artifact itself, a related but very different enterprise.

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Spanish for the Professions 1, Certificate (SPA1)

This certificate is designed for learners interested in acquiring basic Spanish language skills that will prepare them to communicate in basic Spanish professionally and as supplementary preparation for many professional fields, such as paralegal, early childhood education, and business.  

Spanish for the Professions 2, Certificate (SPA2)

This certificate is designed for learners interested in acquiring intermediate Spanish Language skills that will prepare them to communicate at an intermediate level in professional Spanish and as supplementary preparation for many professional fields, such as paralegal, early childhood education, and business.

View full A-Z Course List

ENG - English

ENG 050  Developmental English  

This course is intended to prepare students for college-level writing by using a multi-step approach and providing a comprehensive review of grammar. Students will move from paragraph to essay writing while developing basic research skills. Students will develop their critical thinking skills through reading and writing. NOTE: Credits from the course are not applicable toward a degree.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate critical thinking and writing in various rhetorical situations.
Demonstrate awareness of the rhetorical situation by making appropriate choices for a given writing task.
Craft a thesis that can be supported with evidence in the body and conclusion.
Demonstrate that writing is a process.
Apply formal conventions of written American English with respect to grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.
Provide critical assessment of college-appropriate texts.
Synthesize basic research skills.

Prerequisites: ESL 044. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 099  ALP English  

ENG 099 provides individualized instruction and regular practice in writing essays for college audiences and critically reading and understanding college-level texts. Specific attention will be paid to effective reading strategies and a recursive understanding of the writing process. This course is part of DCCC's Accelerated Learning Program, which enables students to complete developmental coursework in English while simultaneously enrolling in ENG 100. This program enables students to develop their skills quickly and to complete their college English requirements faster than with the typical sequential approach to these classes. Students wishing to enroll in college level courses with ENG 099, have the option to enroll in any of the following courses: HIS 110, HIS 120, HIS 150, HIS 160, HUM 160, SOC 110 or SOC 120. NOTE: Corequisite - Every section of ENG 099 will be linked to a section of ENG 100 taught by the same instructor. Students who register for a section of ENG 099 must simultaneously register for the corresponding ENG 100 section.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Practice effective writing strategies for all steps of the writing process, including invention, planning, drafting, revising, and editing.
Write for various contexts with an awareness of audience.
Write thesis-driven essays that are clearly organized and developed with appropriate evidence.
Demonstrate critical reading skills by annotating, analyzing, and thoughtfully responding to a variety of challenging texts.
Demonstrate critical reading, thinking, and writing in various rhetorical situations and make appropriate rhetorical choices for given writing tasks.
Demonstrate proficient comprehension of and a critical assessment of college-appropriate texts using strategic and critical reading.
Practice basic research skills such as developing a research question, accessing reliable sources, and evaluating content.
Manage commonly experienced obstacles to effective writing, such as procrastination and writing-related anxiety.
Demonstrate intellectual engagement through regular, punctual attendance and active, in-class participation.

Concurrent: ENG 100

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 100  English Composition I  

This course reviews the principles of composition, including rhetoric, grammar and usage. It emphasizes critical thinking, the recursive nature of writing, the writing of analytical essays, and the application of information literacy skills.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply college-level critical thinking and writing in various rhetorical situations.
Compose original, thesis-based essays with cogent, well-supported evidence.
Use appropriate rhetorical techniques for a specific writing task.
Demonstrate organizational skills in constructing an essay with an introduction, conclusion, and transitions.
Explore and evaluate appropriate academic databases to find credible primary and secondary sources.
Synthesize appropriate sources to produce a research paper with accurate documentation.
Employ prewriting, drafting, and revision strategies.
Apply formal conventions of standard English with respect to grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Information Literacy (IL), Written Communication (WC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 112  English Composition II: Writing About Literature  

ENG 112 is a writing course emphasizing both literature and information literacy skills that reinforce basic principles of composition learned in ENG 100. The course develops critical thinking through the study of literature and the use of advanced research techniques to write analytical/critical and research essays. NOTE: Prerequisite ENG 100 requires grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate critical thinking and writing in response to literature.
Compose original, thesis-based analytical/critical essays in response to literature.
Express ideas logically and clearly using appropriate rhetorical techniques.
Analyze fiction, poetry, drama, and other literature using the elements of literature from different critical perspectives.
Access and evaluate source material using current information literacy skills.
Synthesize source material using MLA documentation in a plagiarism-free, multi-source essay/research paper based on a work of literature.
Revise, edit, and proofread to produce final drafts applying formal conventions of American English with respect to grammar, mechanics and punctuation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Information Literacy (IL), Written Communication (WC)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 115  Research for English Majors  

This course introduces English majors to the organization, retrieval and evaluation of electronic and print information in their field. Students will understand the evolving nature of information in the digital age. Emphasis will be on developing viable research questions, using academic library systems effectively, evaluating traditional and emerging scholarly resources in a variety of formats, and using the information in an ethical manner by citing resources according to current MLA standards.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish between literary criticism; book, film and theater reviews; and biographical articles.
Identify critical approaches to literature, such as feminist, Marxist, reader-response, psychoanalytical, etc.
Identify major journal databases and aggregate databases in their field (includes e-books and e-ref books) such as JSTOR and the Gale Literature Resource Center.
Use advanced features of databases, such as Boolean searching, limiters, etc.
Become familiar with features of online book catalogs at Delaware County Community College Library and other academic and public libraries.
Evaluate literacy criticism in books and essays.
Use reference book/e-books, handbooks and Internet to retrieve cultural, historical and background information on authors, literary movements, timelines and literary theories.
Evaluate the role of “free” Internet web sites in the field of English and related areas of study, such as grammar sites, ready reference sites, citation generators, Google Books, Google Scholar, Open Source Movement.
Demonstrate knowledge of MLA citation standards for a variety of resources.
Be aware of software and user services relevant to their field, such as subscription citation generators (endnote, refworks), turnitin, and smarthinking.
Compose and present original literary analysis in both print and multimedia forms.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 130  Fundamentals of Journalism I  

This is a writing-intensive course designed for students contemplating a career in journalism. The course will focus on the principles and techniques of journalism with an emphasis on the print media, primarily weekly and daily newspapers. Topics include the nature of news, news gathering techniques, news reporting, digital journalism, ethics of journalism and journalism law.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define "news".
Discuss the impact of electronic media on print media.
Explain the organization and hierarchy of a typical newspaper.
Define newspaper terms.
Interview sources.
Write a lead.
Write news and feature copy according to AP Style.
Create a blog.
Explain journalism law with respect to libel and invasion of privacy.
Identify and summarize three ethical philosophies pertaining to journalism.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 131  Fundamentals of Journalism II  

This writing intensive course is designed for students contemplating a career in journalism, public relations or advertising. Students will continue to practice news gathering and writing techniques learned in Fundamentals of Journalism I (ENG130) as well as techniques in copy editing. While doing so, students will assist in the writing, editing and production of the campus newspaper. Students will also learn to write copy for public relations, advertising and broadcast media.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Write and edit news and feature stories according to AP Style.
Edit news and feature stories using copy-editing symbols.
Submit articles electronically to an editor.
Write broadcast copy.
Write advertising copy.
Write a news release.
Create a press kit for a public relations event.

Prerequisites: ENG 130.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 205  Creative Writing: Introduction  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine and create various elements of prose and poetry. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help move them from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; over the course of the semester, students will read, analyze and critique classmates’ submissions, a process which will help yield more effective works of prose and poetry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the elements necessary to build effective works of poetry and prose.
Create prose that demonstrates the ability to establish developed character that can move through a narrative structure.
Craft poetry that effectively employs sound, imagery and structure.
Examine and evaluate prose and poetry to create a body of polished work that demonstrates knowledge of the effectual elements of each genre.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic poetry and prose.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 206  Creative Writing: Non-Fiction and Memoirs  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of nonfiction. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; students will read, analyze and critique classmates' submissions. In addition to writing their own works, students will read a wide range of published nonfiction and should have a basic understanding of the various modes within the genre.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and discuss the work of important nonfiction texts in terms of structure, dramatic arc, central metaphors and symbols, physicality, and dialogue.
Describe the different types of creative nonfiction: personal essay, memoir, travel writing, profile/biography, feature article/literacy journalism, food writing, etc.
Gather research for a nonfiction piece.
Create nonfiction pieces that include narrative, scene development, character development, dialogue, description, and reflection.
Compose drafts and develop a revision plan.
Share work with fellow writers with a intent of considering feedback and potentially incorporating the ideas of others.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 207  Creative Writing: An Introduction to Playwriting  

This course introduces students to the concepts of dramatic writing, with an emphasis on character and structure. The course is intended to provide the student with practical experience in the creative process of composing stage-worthy plays.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and discuss the work of important playwrights in terms of structure, dramatic arc, central metaphors and symbols, physicality, and dialogue.
Describe the standard format of play.
Research ideas for use in plays.
Formulate different dramatic ideas.
Create dialogue, characters, and relationships intended for the stage.
Compose and revise plays.
Share work with fellow writers with the intent of listening to feedback and potentially incorporating the ideas of others into the work.
Work with actors to refine dialogue.
Use physical-mental exercises to inspire and sustain dramatic writing.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 208  Creative Writing II - Short Story  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of fiction. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; each week, students will read, analyze and critique classmates’ submissions—a process which will help yield vivid characters, compelling scenes and sustained conflict.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the elements necessary to build effective works of fiction, including: characterization, narration, setting, scene, plot, theme and conflict.
Create works of fiction that demonstrate the ability to lead characters through a cohesive narrative structure.
Analyze and evaluate prose in order to discern the literary elements which produce the most success in prose.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic and effectual works of fiction.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 209  Creative Writing: Poetry  

This is a workshop-intensive course in which students will examine various elements that help writers produce effective works of poetry. The workshops are an integral part of any creative writing course, and they are designed to provide students with critical and constructive feedback that will help them move from the planning stage through to the revision process. Therefore, the major focus will be student submissions; students will read, analyze and critique classmates' submissions - a process which will help yield proficiency and understanding of form, vivid imagery, and compelling use of language and wordplay.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize and understand the elements necessary to build effective poems, including; music and sound, figurative language, persona and voice, imagery, theme and tone.
Create poems that demonstrate the ability to purposefully utilize language in a cohesive lyric or narrative structure.
Analyze and evaluate poetic techniques and elements in order to discern which produce the most successful verse in a given context or purpose.
Synthesize criticism and analysis to create dynamic and effectual poetic works.

Corequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 214  Women in Literature  

Women in Literature is a course that allows students to look at women as they are perceived by others and as they perceive themselves. Through literary creations supplemented by films, speakers, articles and anecdotal contributions from students, we will look at women from a variety of ethnic, social and racial groups, including but not limited to African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos and Native Americans. As part of the study of literature by and about women in our world, students will also consider some of the historical, political, economic and religious realities that have shaped and continue to shape our perceptions of women.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the roles of women reflected in selected literature.
Construct a series of response essays that demonstrate a critical analysis of the literature under discussion.
Demonstrate research and documentation skills through the exploration of a selected topic.
Explain the roles of women in literature in terms of economic, political and social issues.
Identify literary contributions by women of color who traditionally have had no "voice," such as African American, Asian American, Chicano and Native American writers.
Analyze the literary elements of the works studied.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 215  Mystery and Detective Fiction  

This course is a study of the genre of mystery and detective fiction. It will focus on the development of the genre and the evolution of its various schools such as Golden Age mysteries, hard-boiled detective novels, and the police procedural. The course will also call attention to the cultural contexts in which these writings were produced.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify literature as the product of a particular cultural climate.
Examine the role of literary elements in the reading selection.
Recognize the characteristics of the distinct schools within the mystery and detective fiction genre.
Compose critical essays that analyze mystery and detective fiction.
Discuss the development of mystery and detective fiction genre.
Trace the correlations between mystery and detective fiction and other literacy genres.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 216  Science Fiction Literature  

This course is a study of speculative writing that creatively represents the hard sciences and/or the social sciences in fiction. It will focus on the different subgenres found within the genre and will call attention to the cultural contexts in which these writings were produced.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify literature as the product of a particular cultural climate.
Discuss the development of science fiction as a genre and its relationship to other literacy genres.
Discuss the characteristics of the different subgenres within the genre of science fiction.
Recognize the ways in which science fiction writers encourage critical assessment of the real world.
Examine the use of literacy elements found in the reading selections.
Compose critical essays that analyze science fiction.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 220  British Literature I  

This is a survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon era to the pre-Romantics with attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices and styles of writing in British literature from the medieval era to the pre-Romantic period.
Discuss British literary works by and about marginalized-underrepresented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze British literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historical contexts and/or critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA guidelines.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 221  British Literature II  

This is a survey of British literature from the Romantics to the Moderns with the attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices, and styles of writing in British literature from the Romantic period to the post WWII era.
Discuss British literary works by and about marginalized/under-represented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze British literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historic contexts and/or other critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA documentation guidelines.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 222  Introduction to Shakespeare  

This course is a study of representative Shakespearean plays set against the literary, political and social setting that spawned them. Attention is paid to Shakespeare's influence not only in the development of the drama, but also in the literary tradition of the English-speaking world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the particular types of plays and poetic verse of Shakespeare.
Reconstruct the text of Shakespeare's plays in order to view them as dramatic productions.
Examine how literary elements function within Shakespeare's work.
Read and comprehend Shakespeare's language.
Analyze Shakespeare's writings as products of the Renaissance cultural climate.
Recognize the correlations between historical context and literary sources in Shakespeare's work.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 230  American Literature I  

This is a survey of American literature from the colonial era through the end of the Civil War with attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices, and styles of writing in American literature from the colonial era to 1865.
Discuss American literary works by and about marginalized / underrepresented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze American literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historical contexts and/or critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA guidelines.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 231  American Literature II  

This is a survey of American literature from 1865 to the present with attention given to both major and marginalized works and writers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major authors, literary genres, literary devices, and styles of writing in American literature from 1865 to the present.
Discuss American literary works by and about marginalized / under-represented peoples in the context of their historical struggle and contemporary relevance.
Compose essays that analyze American literary works in relation to their social, economic, and historical contexts and/or critical perspectives.
Apply current information literacy techniques to develop multi-source research projects that follow MLA guidelines.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 240  World Literature I  

The selective study of great representative literary works of the world from antiquity to modern times with emphasis on their social, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds. Special attention is given to the literature of continental Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the major characteristics of early literature (the ancient world to the Renaissance) from Asia, North and South America, Europe, Oceania, and Africa as these relate to literary artifacts.
Discuss in writing how literature works in conversation across cultures by demonstrating an understanding of global and historical themes, influences, and styles as these relate to both specific cultural stories and to stories across cultures.
Compare and contrast literary form and content, including genres, authorship, and styles of writing, that allow us to differentiate and compare stories from across the globe.
Compose essays that analyze literary works, including those or marginalized or under-represented peoples, in relation to various social, economic and historic contexts, and/or aesthetic traditions.
Demonstrate an ability to analyze and/or synthesize secondary sources, use current information literacy techniques, and document sources according to MLA-style in the context of a multi-source project.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 241  World Literature II  

This course continues the balanced, selective study of great representative literary works from the Renaissance to the present day in their geographic, historic, socio-economic, and political contexts. Attention is given to genres, writing styles, and applicable critical approaches. The "emerging" literatures--works by women, colonials, post-colonials and those groups generally denied a voice--are studied in an attempt to enlarge the cannon and render it inclusive.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss major writers and their influences in and contributions to world literature.
Discuss dominant themes/genres/writing styles in the established and emerging literatures.
Identify major historical and philosophical influences of modern life as they are represented in literary artifacts.
Demonstrate in discussions and writing an awareness of the struggle of writers of the emerging literatures to find a voice, an audience, and a hearing.
Respond to the writers and literature encountered in the form of critical, analytical, and/or argumentative multi-source essays that employ current information literacy techniques and apply correct MLA documentation.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 243  Topics in Contemporary Literature  

This course is a study of literature that has been produced in the past few decades. It may feature selected topics and/or themes from a variety of fiction, drama, and poetry.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify various themes and techniques found in postmodern literature such as irony, pastiche, intertextuality, metafiction, temporal distortion, etc.
Identify literature as the product of a particular cultural climate.
Recognize the ways in which postmodern literature is a response to modern literature.
Examine the use of literacy elements found in the reading selections.
Compose critical essays that analyze the reading selections.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 245  Black American Literature  

Black American Literature is a comprehensive survey of the writings of African Americans beginning with the 18th century through the present. By way of reading, lecture and discussion, students will analyze the various genres, topics, mores and traditions identified with African Americans and their historical and cultural significance.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the roles of African Americans in the larger culture as reflected in selected literature.
Trace historical developments among Blacks in America from their African roots through slavery, the Civil War and the industrialized 20th century.
Analyze literary elements of the works studied.
Discuss the origins of racial stereotypes, discrimination and segregation as they appear in selected works.
Write an essay discussing the aforementioned topics.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ENG 250  Children's Literature  

This course is a critical and analytical study of a variety of texts that represent the many genres of children's literature. It will emphasize how children are influenced by literature and how children's literature reflects the values of the particular culture that produces it.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the characteristics of the different genres of children's literature.
Determine and apply criteria for what may be considered as quality children's literature.
Analyze literary elements such as theme, character, and setting.
Evaluate the contributions that illustrations can make to a text.
Identify literature as a product of a particular cultural climate.
Discuss critically issues of gender, ethnicity, culture, and the individual that are present in the texts.
Design and research a written project that relates to a student's particular interest in children's literature.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

Foreign Languages

ARB 101  Elementary Arabic I  

This course introduces students to Arabic alphabets, articulation of sounds, basic grammar, reading and writing. Vocabulary words for cultural and social settings are introduced. Listening and speaking are emphasized in class and laboratory settings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Learn Arabic alphabets, sounds and articulation.
Recognize one-way and two-way connector letters.
Sound and write accurately long and short vowels.
Identify the Arabic marking system for long and short vowels.
Develop basic vocabulary, reading and comprehension.
Apply basic grammatical structure in writing.
Understand social manners and behavior in Arabic culture.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ARB 102  Elementary Arabic II  

This course is to help students become more proficient in the four skills of Modern Standard Arabic: writing, reading, listening and speaking.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Learn and write the Arabic Alphabets and marking system.
Read and pronounce the Arabic sounds correctly.
Take dictation and apply critical auditory and recognition skills for short and long vowels .
Write short sentences and paragraphs using basic grammatical structure.
Translate simple paragraphs and sentences from Arabic to English and English to Arabic.
Converse about oneself, family and other social/cultural settings using vocabulary and grammar accurately.
Develop awareness and understanding of the cultural, social, religious, political and geographical diversity of the Arab world.

Prerequisites: ARB 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FRE 101  Elementary French I  

The basic principles of pronunciation and grammar of the French language are emphasized. Vocabulary dealing with everyday situations is covered. Listening and speaking skills are developed through laboratory practice and increased use of French in the classroom. Recommended for those with less than 2 years High School French.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Reproduce with reasonable accuracy the sounds of the language.
Respond in French in a satisfactory manner to basic conversational situations.
Produce appropriate pattern and sentence transformation.
Write in dictation form with a reasonable degree of accuracy from materials that have already been studied.
Recall facts and observations of cultural interest.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FRE 102  Elementary French II  

This course stresses progress in the speaking, writing and reading skills begun in FRE 101 and promotes greater understanding of French culture. The mandatory use of laboratory tapes further develops listening and speaking skills. NOTE: Alternate pre-requisite - two years of HS French.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an increased understanding of the principles of good pronunciation.
Show some facility in responding to familiar questions and requests given in French.
Demonstrate in reading and writing an understanding of grammatical concepts previously presented.
Exercise control of a larger vocabulary.
Write in dictation form from familiar texts.
Recall facts of culture contrasts shown in assigned reading.

Prerequisites: FRE 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FRE 111  Intermediate French I  

Review of the basic sounds of the French language, first-level vocabulary and grammatical content. Introduction of new language concepts and more advanced vocabulary and idioms. Weekly laboratory practice to strengthen understanding of fluent speech. NOTE: Prerequisites: FRE 102 or three years of high school French or 1 year of college French.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the ability to read directly in French with increasing attention to correctness of sounds, rhythm, accentuation and intonation.
Reproduce a representative number of the dialogue situations previously illustrated.
Demonstrate correct use of essential grammatical and idiomatic structures previously presented.
Produce original coherent sentences and short paragraphs.
Write familiar texts by dictation.
Identify patterns of cultural behavior or customs that have been presented in class discussions.

Prerequisites: FRE 102.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

FRE 112  Intermediate French II  

Focus on understanding new language principles and the identification of these concepts in reading and writing. Reading in French from a variety of practical, cultural and literary texts. Frequent listening and speaking practice. Weekly laboratory exercises for better understanding of fluent French. NOTE: Prerequisites: FRE 111 or four years of high school French.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Respond in French with reasonable accuracy and clarity to questions within the scope of the course.
Read directly and accurately in the language at a level comprehensible to one fluent in French.
Reconstruct or significantly modify learned responses or conversational patterns.
Write coherent sentences and short paragraphs that use grammatical elements previously illustrated.
Write in dictation form from class materials studied.
Show some familiarity with French language contributions to the Western World and/or with cross-cultural contributions encountered in the course.

Prerequisites: FRE 111.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

GER 101  Elementary German I  

The basic principles of pronunciation and grammar of the German language are covered and vocabulary dealing with everyday situations is emphasized. Listening and speaking skills are developed through laboratory practice and increased use of German in the classroom. NOTE: Prerequisites: Fewer than two years of high school German.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the essential differences between the German and English pronunciation systems.
Understand in oral and written form first-level content words and grammatical principles.
Read aloud in German with due attention to principles of good pronunciation including word stress and intonation patterns.
Produce appropriate pattern and sentence transformation.
Write in dictation form with a reasonable degree of accuracy from materials that have been studied.
Recall familiar facts of German culture from reading assignments.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

GER 102  Elementary German II  

This course stresses progress in the speaking, writing and reading skills begun in GER 101 and promotes understanding of German culture. The mandatory use of laboratory tapes further develops listening and speaking skills. NOTE: Prerequisites: GER 101 or two years of high school German or 1 semester of college German.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Respond in German to a representative number of daily situations.
Produce with more accuracy the phonetic sounds of the language.
Read familiar prose aloud in a manner acceptable to the fluent speaker.
Carry out familiar requests made in German.
Demonstrate increased command of vocabulary and elements of grammar.
Briefly express ideas on a given topic.
Recall familiar facts of German civilizations from reading assignments.

Prerequisites: GER 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ITA 101  Elementary Italian I  

Introduces the basic principles of pronunciation and grammar essentials of the Italian language. Continuing emphasis on development of listening and speaking skills.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the essential differences between the Italian and English pronunciation systems.
Understand in oral and written form first-level content words and grammatical principles.
Read aloud in Italian with due attention to principles of good pronunciation including word-stress intonation patterns.
Produce appropriate pattern and sentence transformations.
Write in dictation form with a reasonable degree of accuracy from materials that have been studied.
Recall familiar facts of Italian and European civilizations from reading assignments.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ITA 102  Elementary Italian II  

A continuation of Elementary Italian I with introduction to reading short cultural and practical essays. Weekly laboratory practice extends the basis for understanding the spoken language. NOTE: Alternate Pre-Req - 2 years of HS Italian

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Respond in Italian to a representative number of daily situations according to dialogues illustrated.
Produce with more accuracy the phonetic sounds of the language and include the correct rhythm, stress and linking components.
Read familiar prose aloud in a manner acceptable to the fluent speaker.
Carry out familiar requests made in Italian.
Demonstrate increased command of vocabulary and elements of grammar.
Express briefly ideas on a given topic when guidance is offered.
Recall familiar facts of Italian and European civilizations from reading assignments.

Prerequisites: ITA 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SPA 101  Elementary Spanish I  

This is a first semester introduction to the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures. It is designed for beginning students with little or no previous exposure to the language. The emphasis is on the development of the three modes of communication: interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive, through the mastery of basic grammatical structures. Through the use of language and additional methods students will gain knowledge of cultural practices and perspectives in Spain and Latin America. Additionally, students will learn about political, economic, and socio-cultural differences and similarities within the Hispanic community in a global context. This course requires active participation in online activities as a mandatory component. Online courses may require use of a webcam. Native, heritage and or speakers of Spanish are encouraged to take the CLEP exam before enrolling in this course. NOTE: Two or less years of high school Spanish, or less than one semester of college study.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Students engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions in Spanish.
Students understand and interpret written and spoken Spanish on basic level on a variety of topics.
In Spanish, students present or communicate information, concepts and ideas on a basic level to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of global topics including, socio-economic issues, political issues, historical and environmental effects.
Through a global perspective, students will demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of similarities and differences between Spanish speaking practices, artistic expression, and popular culture.
Students demonstrate understanding of language through comparisons between Spanish and English.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SPA 102  Elementary Spanish II  

This course is a continuation of Elementary Spanish language and Hispanic cultures. It is designed for students who have completed SPA 101 or at least two years of recent successful high school Spanish. The emphasis is on the development of the three modes of communication: interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive, through the mastery of basic grammatical structures. Through the use of language and additional methods students will gain knowledge of cultural practices and perspectives in Spain and Latin America. Additionally, students will learn about political, economic, and socio-cultural differences and similarities within the Hispanic community in a global context. This course requires active participation in online activities as a mandatory component. Online courses may require use of a webcam. Native, heritage and or speakers of Spanish are encouraged to take the CLEP exam before enrolling in this course. NOTE: Two years of recent successful high school Spanish or SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Students engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions in Spanish.
Students understand and interpret written and spoken Spanish on basic level on a variety of topics.
In Spanish, students present or communicate information, concepts and ideas on a basic level to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of global topics including, socio-economic issues, political issues, historical and environmental effects.
Through a global perspective, students will demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of similarities and differences between Spanish speaking practices, artistic expression, and popular culture.
Students demonstrate understanding of language through comparisons between Spanish and English.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: SPA 101 and ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SPA 201  Intermediate Spanish I  

Active review of Spanish pronunciation and of fundamental grammatical elements. Study and practice with new concepts of grammar and idiomatic language. Class discussion of selected cultural essays, news articles and/or literary excerpts. Laboratory practice is assigned for improving comprehension of Spanish spoken at normal conversation speeds. NOTE: Alternate Pre-requisite 3 years of H.S. Spanish or 1 year of college Spanish.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Speak the language in meaningful sentences and appropriate phrases that can be understood by the fluent speaker.
Respond appropriately to questions on reading selections previously discussed.
Recall vocabulary, grammatical structures and appropriate correspondence to idiomatic structures in Spanish writings.
Take dictation from familiar texts.
Recall important facts and observations taken from selected readings on Hispanic and Latin American civilizations previously studied.

Prerequisites: SPA 102.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SPA 202  Intermediate Spanish II  

Continued emphasis on active Spanish review of grammatical concepts and instruction in new principles. More attention is given to speaking and understanding the target language through a variety of texts including essays and selected masterpieces in poetry and prose. Includes directed and free compositions to enhance writing skills. Laboratory practice is offered for better comprehension of spoken Spanish. NOTE: Alternate pre-requisite - 4 years HS Spanish

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate increasing skill in communicating in Spanish.
Respond appropriately to questions arising from dialogue, readings and situations previously illustrated.
Read silently in Spanish, concentrating on the ideas expressed in writing.
Write complete and meaningful paragraphs and short compositions incorporating newly learned grammatical principles.
Write in dictation form from familiar texts.
Recall a significant number of facts or observations derived from selected essays on the Hispanic heritage.

Prerequisites: SPA 201 or SPA 111.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM - Humanities

HUM 100  Introduction to Visual Arts  

This course introduces students, through a broad overview, to the nature of art, the people who make art, forms of art takes and the cultural significance of art. Students consider the various roles of artists and how those roles evolved historically within a socio-cultural context. Additionally, students will learn how global concerns affecting marginalized populations, politics, economics, technology, and the environment impact the art that is produced. A thorough introduction to the elements and principles of design will lay the foundation for visual literacy on which students will analyze and critique various disciplines including drawing, painting, photography, film, video, sculpture, architecture, crafts, and environmental design. Issues concerning aesthetics, creativity, and perception will also be addressed in this course. NOTE: Alternate pre-requisite - permission of the instructor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify several themes and purposes of art.
Identify the visual elements and apply them in analysis of various two-and three-dimensional media.
Identify the principles of design in art.
Apply principles of design and personal aesthetics to criticism and analysis of various art media.
Demonstrate an understanding of a comprehensive list of terms common in the art world and apply those terms in written criticism.
Demonstrate a knowledge of a variety of roles artists have assumed in society.
Demonstrate a knowledge of the traits characteristic of these artists and their styles.
Demonstrate a knowledge of tools, methods and materials used in a broad spectrum of two-and three-dimensional media.
Demonstrate a sense of the chronological history of the arts.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 110  Early Cultures through the Middle Ages  

This survey course introduces students to various cultural constructs within a global context. Students will examine and discuss similarities and differences of socio-cultural, historical gender, religious and environmental struggles from prehistoric times through the middle ages. Literature, the visual/performing arts and archaeology practices will be used to study social equity, economic issues, and basic theories of the early human experience. Furthermore, this course will help students gain an understanding and critical awareness as they experience the broader world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the artistic, social, cultural and religious achievements of the first civilizations.
Explain the historical and aesthetic development of various cultural patterns from per-history to the Renaissance.
Articulate the contributions of diverse peoples to literature, government, religion, visual and performing arts.
Articulate the major aesthetic principles of poetry, prose, painting, music, architecture and sculpture within this time period.
Trace the influences of these earlier cultures on the present day global community.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 120  Renaissance Humanism to Twenty-First Century Globalism  

This course continues the survey begun in HUM 110 of the cultural legacy of the global community. In an historical context, students will survey the literature and the visual and performing arts of various societies from the Baroque (17th century) to the Post-Modem (21st century) period. Students will also examine the impact of science and technology, as well as the social and cultural realities in this period.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the artistic, social, cultural and religious achievements from the Baroque to the 21st century.
Explain the historical and aesthetic development of various cultural patterns from the Baroque to the 21st century.
Articulate the contributions of diverse peoples to literature, science, religion, visual and performing arts, and modern technology.
Articulate the major aesthetic principles of poetry, prose, painting, music, architecture and sculpture within this time period.
Trace the influences of these more recent cultures on the present day global.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 121  Myth  

This writing-intensive course surveys ancient and modern world myths that still have an impact on our self-concepts and/or inform our ideas of society, power, and social structure. Narrative myths are studied as well as their interpretations in visual art and music. Beginning with a focus on Babylonian and Egyptian mythology, the course uses literature, art, music and film to evaluate mythology's place in helping us to understand the human condition and in understanding how humans perceive and structure society. Readings vary from semester to semester, but will include stories from major world mythologies, various geographic regions, and various historical periods, for example Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, Germanic, Asian, North and South American, African, and Australian traditions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze and interpret myths to gain an understanding of how they function and change within/across historical contexts, societies, groups, and cultures.
Identify and paraphrase mythological themes and motifs that are universal across world cultures.
Identify how mythic stories reveal and support social structures and cultural values.
Compare aspects of myth-based fiction as seen in film, novels, popular culture, and television.
Identify versions of myths in rituals, visual art, and music.
Analyze in writing and discussion the differences between the original myths and their current manifestations.
Demonstrate the concept of “storytelling” rights as these relate to power and prestige.
Discuss in writing how myths/stories can construct ideas about race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation and how stories can be used to institutionalize inequities.
Using elements of the writing process, produce a well-documented, well-researched final paper on an assigned topic in mythology.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU), Written Communication (WC)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 141  Film Language  

This course is intended to engage students with the study of film as art as a unique technological form. The course includes a brief overview of genres and movements throughout global film history and a survey of various critical approaches to analyzing film. NOTE: 1) Alternate prerequisite - permission of instructor; 2) Students may be required to subscribe to a streaming service chosen by the instructor for the duration of the semester in addition to acquiring a textbook.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize common characteristics of various film genres.
Discuss the evolution of technological advances in the history of film production.
Examine 20th and 21st Century global film movements.
Analyze formal elements of the moving image such as light, shot composition, space/time, editing, sound, narrative and acting.
Distinguish the differences between studying the art of film and conducting cultural critical analyses of cinema and the film industry.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 142  American Cinema  

This course is intended to introduce students to the socio-cultural impact of the American Film Industry from the silent era through the present. Students will also become familiar with the study of film as a powerful, cultural artifact and as an artistic medium. NOTES: 1) Alternate prerequisite - permission of instructor; 2) Students may be required to subscribe to a streaming service chosen by the instructor for the duration of the semester in addition to acquiring a textbook; 3) Students taking this course as distance learning should be aware of its independent study aspects.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the changing nature of the American film industry in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.
Demonstrate accurate usage of artistic, technological and industrial film vocabulary.
Explain both historical and contemporary aspects of American film production, distribution, exhibition and reception.
Recognize the contributions of marginalized communities in the history of American cinema.
Discuss the socio-cultural impact of film as an artistic medium and commercial product.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 160  Introduction to World Religions  

This course introduces students to the five major religions of the world: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. We will read, research and discuss the historical, ethical and spiritual foundation of each religion, its beliefs and practices, in order understand its place in the perennial search for Truth and its relevance in the world today. The goal of this course is to set the stage for authentic inter-religious dialogue to prevent religious conflict and dogmatic discrimination.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the developmental stages of each of the five major religions.
Evaluate the principal tenets of each of these belief systems.
Describe the most important practices of each of these religions.
Analyze the inter-relative or conflicting theological, social and historical tenets of the five religions discussed from a global perspective.
Recognize how the tenets or beliefs of each religion fostered or hindered integration or separation within their cultural background and in comparison to the other religions discussed.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 162  Islam  

This class is an in-depth analysis of the historical, religious, ethical and political foundations of ISLAM, including the life of the prophet Mohommed, the Qur'an and its various branches, especially Sufism.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Improve their reading comprehensive and writing skills.
Improve their research skills (traditional and on-line).
Understand the development and history of Islam.
Understand the relationship between Islam and the other Judeo-Christian traditions.
Recognize the important cultural and spiritual contributions of Islam.
Describe the most important rituals and tenets of Islam.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 168  Buddhism  

This class is an in-depth analysis of the historical, philosophical, religious and ethical foundations of Buddhism, including the life of Gautama Siddhartha, Buddhist philosophy, the three major branches of Buddhism (i.e. Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana) and Buddhism in the West. The class includes in-class meditation/mindfulness practices.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Conduct college-level research on the critical aspects of Buddhism.
Analyze in writing and discussion the relationship between Buddhism and other religious traditions.
Describe the essential aspects of Buddhist philosophy at the college level.
Write or discuss the historical development of Buddhism.
Develop an informed approach to Buddhist culture and religion.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Corequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 205  Latino American Culture  

This course provides an overview of the Latino-American cultural heritage. Based on elements from anthropology, culture (both folk and popular), film, folklore, language and linguistics, theater and drama, and literature, the course examines various cultural traditions within Latino-American society.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and describe significant events and factors that have characterized and influenced the various traditional, folk and popular cultures of Latinos residing in the United States.
Identify major Latino personalities and their contributions to culture in the United States.
Demonstrate the ability to describe the cultural experiences of Latinos as residents and citizens in the United States.
Describe the contributions of Latinos to American culture.
Apply course concepts and use appropriate terminology when describing the Latino cultural experience.
Conduct a research project and make a presentation on a significant topic or issue relating to Latino-American culture.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

HUM 212  The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Florence  

Through an experiential approach, students will study the Renaissance as it flowered in Florence, the Italian city most associated with the birth of that cultural/historical era and its emphasis on humanism. Students will be introduced to the landmarks of Florentine history from its Roman beginnings to the Sixteenth Century. The study of Renaissance art and architecture will begin with an over-view of the ideas central to the Classical world and end with the transition to Mannerism. Classroom lectures will be the springboard to the onsite experience of art/architecture in both sacred and secular places. In addition to viewing art in museums and churches, students will be introduced to well- known cultural artifacts that mirrored everyday life in the palazzo as well as the more common Renaissance home. The changing role of the artist in society , the larger themes and purposes of art, the vocabulary of art and the principles of design will be topics of discussion, study and practice. The course is part of a study abroad experience. Living in Florence will provide students with a first- hand knowledge of the Florentine people who created part of the Italian culture. NOTE: Alternate pre-req - Permission of instructor.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand the importance of the archaeological finds of Fiesole’s Roman Temple, Roman theater, and Roman baths.
Define the terms “classical antiquity”.
Define the term “Renaissance” and articulate exactly what was reborn.
Understand how Renaissance architects were inspired by the “language and principles of classical architecture”.
Trace the impact of classical humanism on Renaissance art, architecture and culture in general.
Understand the struggle between the Guelphs and the Ghibelines and their impact on Florence and Siena.
Explain the evolution of the guild system and its power in Renaissance Florentine politics, and the significance of Or San Michele.
Understand the importance of the precursors of the Renaissance: Cimebue, Sts.
Dominic and Frances, Nicola and Giovanni Pisano, Duccio di Buoninsegna, Dante Alighieri, Giotto, Martini, Lorenzetti, Orcagna, and Andrea da Firenze.
Define the following common terms in architecture and identify them in buildings both sacred/secular: arch, dome, post and lintel, cupola, colonnade, capital, entablature, flutes, shaft, Latin Cross, choir, transept, sacristy, coffered ceiling, side aisles, pendentives, bays, niches, facade, balustrade, cantilever, pilaster, loggia, nave, the Orders, round arch and vault, pointed arch.
Trace the rise of the architect from the cathedral mason/carpenter.
Articulate the importance of Vitruvius and his treatise on architecture.
Recognize the visual elements and the principles of design and be able to use them in a limited written analysis of paintings and sculpture.
Understand the geographical and political framework of the Italian city-states and their competiveness.
Explain the “casiato” as a source of information about artists and their patrons.
Identify major architectural and sculptural achievements in Florence 1400-1460.
Identify major artists and their paintings in Florence 1400-1460.
Identify the major works of Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo and Raphael in the late 15th Century (Florence and Rome).
Demonstrate a basic understanding of Brunelleschi’s perspective system.
Articulate the difference between linear perspective and atmospheric perspective.
Demonstrate a broad understanding of the Renaissance genius as a phenomenon in Renaissance Italy.
Explain basic social, cultural, political and geographical conditions that caused the arts to flourish in Florence.
Understand the chronological/historical development of art in Florence through both a study of theory and repeated encounters with the art on-site or in museums.
Articulate the controversy over the impact of the Black Death on the art that followed it.
Name and identify the 5 Orders of architecture known in the Renaissance.
Understand the term “patronage” and articulate the role of the Medici as patrons of the arts.
Explain how the Renaissance house became an outward symbol of status and wealth through its art and furnishing.
Describe the role of ceramic ware in Renaissance culture.
Explain the role of palace architecture in Renaissance cities.
Recognize a variety of scenes from the life of Jesus Christ.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 4 Weekly Lab Hours

HUM 295  Mindfulness Education and Stress Reduction for College Students: The Art of Breathing  

This is an inter-discplinary, co-taught course that offers a systematic approach to stress reduction. It is also designed to help students to learn, study, experience and evaluate the numerous benefits of mindfulness practice, such as enhanced critical thinking, improved academic abilities, conflict resolution, increase in personal effectiveness in dealing with life stressors particular to college students. The course is taught by a team of humanities and nursing faculty and will include mindfulness practices, body work (yoga, Tai Chi, Chi Ghong), scientific/clinical neurobiological data collection and evaluation and research on the connection between body and mind, as well as the historical and philosophical roots of mindulness practice. Particular attention will be paid to teaching to reduce test anxiety, especially for high status testing for professional certification such as PRAXIS and NCLEX. Note: This course is a pilot/special studies course that may or may not transfer. This course cannot be required as a prerequisite course or a progam course. One section of this course will be offered in Fall, 2016, Spring, 2017 and, Fall, 2017

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the nature of mindfulness and describe methods to practice it.
Identify theories of stress reduction.
Research and understand the historical roots and philosophy of mindfulness.
Use bodywork techniques for stress reduction.
Investigate the connections between well-being and mindfulness.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PHI - Philosophy

PHI 100  Introduction to Philosophy  

This course is an introduction to philosophical questions as treated by thinkers from a worldwide range of philosophical traditions. The course will explore issues drawn from at least three traditional areas of philosophical investigation. These areas of philosophy include the following: logic (reasoning and argumentation), ethics (moral theory and its applications), metaphysics (the study of the basic properties of reality), epistemology (the theory of knowledge), philosophy of religion (arguments for the existence of God, etc.) aesthetics (the theory of beauty and its manifestation in art and nature) and political philosophy (the study of principles of governing human society). In each case, philosophical problems will be discussed through the an encounter with both Western and Non-Western thinkers and schools of thought. NOTE: Prerequisites: ENG 100 with grade of “C” or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic elements of sound reasoning and make a cogent argument for philosophical position.
Recognize and explain the basic issues involved with significant philosophical problems as presented in the course.
Identify and demonstrate an understanding of the major philosophical ideas or theories that address the philosophical problems presented in the course.
Critically appraise the arguments of philosophers by offering an account of their strengths and/or weaknesses.
Compare and contrast the works of two philosophers from different world traditions on a specific philosophical topic.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PHI 110  Contemporary Moral Problems  

This course is intended for the beginning student in philosophy. In this course students, after acquiring basic argumentative skills and some background in moral theory, will examine several different contemporary moral problems. The moral problems discussed may include: the legalization of narcotic drugs, abortion, affirmative action, euthanasia, capital punishment, the ethical treatment of animals, etc. The purpose of the class is to discuss the above issues from a reasoned, philosophical perspective. NOTE: Prerequisites: ENG 100 with grade of “C” or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic elements of sound reasoning and make a cogent argument for a position.
Present the major philosophical problems discussed in class.
Analyze the major philosophical problems discussed in class.
Present the ethical theories discussed in class.
Explain the ethical theories discussed in class.
Identify the philosophers discussed in class and present their views.
Critique the views of the philosophers discussed in class.
Formulate and rationally defend an ethical position on a contemporary moral problem.
Apply the philosophical method of argumentation to issues in daily life.

Prerequisites: ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours