Academic Catalog

Law and Public Service

The College Transfer Office is set up to help Delaware County Community College students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. If you are planning to transfer, you are strongly encouraged to meet with a transfer advisor within your first two semesters (or before you reach 30 transferable college credits from all institutions attended).

Associate in Arts  (AA) Degrees

Administration of Justice (AADJ)

The Administration of Justice curriculum is designed to meet the needs of current and prospective students interested in transferring  to a four-year institution for the purpose of receiving a Bachelor’s Degree in Administration of Justice/Criminal Justice and that students will have a smooth transition from the College to the four-year institution of their choice. Additionally, the program is also designed for students who want to receive an Associates Degree. A student in the AADJ program will learn several important aspects of the criminal justice system to include: the role and functions of the various components of the criminal justice system, various theories of criminological behaviors, ethical standards for criminal justice professionals, juvenile justice issues and criminal law and procedure.

Political Science (POL)

The Political Science Program is designed for but not limited to, students who wish to attain a Baccalaureate Degree in Political Science. This program will provide students with the basis and development of the discipline of Political Science in general and then delve into substantive study of each of the major fields within the discipline. Students will also complete courses that meet their general education requirements. Upon successful completion of an Associate in Arts degree in Political Science, students will be able to transfer into parallel programs.

Social Work (SWO)

The Social Work Associate in Arts curriculum was developed to meet the needs of current and prospective students interested in transferring to a college or university and eventually earning a Bachelor in Social Work degree. The curriculum provides students with the introductory-level knowledge in the field of social work study and supports a seamless transfer to the junior level status at a four-year college or university offering a Council of Social Work Education-Accredited Bachelor in Social Work degree (BSW).

Social Workers serve some of the most vulnerable populations; therefore this degree addresses the significant history, policies, theories and applied practices utilized when working with marginalized individuals, families, groups and communities. Social Workers use a person and environment construct that views human challenges through a diverse, multi-systemic lens. An overarching goal of the program is to prepare students to demonstrate the basic knowledge, values and skills that are required of a beginning social work practitioner.

Various transfer institutions require differing elective courses; therefore students are highly encouraged to work closely with a transfer counselor, from the DCCC Career and Counseling Center, to ensure a seamless transfer process to a four-year institution.

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degrees

Paralegal Studies (PLG)

Paralegal Studies is an associate degree program intended to train a generalist paralegal. Graduates from the associate degree program will have a strong foundation in the areas of legal research and writing, contracts, torts, criminal law and property law. Associate degree program graduates are likely to find employment as paralegals under the direction of attorneys (to do otherwise would be practicing law without a license) in law firms, legal departments of large corporations, insurance companies, title companies, legal service companies and federal, state or local courts and governmental agencies.

Students who wish to pursue additional education in law or in other disciplines as part of their future plans should consult with an advisor before selecting courses.

No person shall engage or assist a person who is not a member of the bar in the performance of activities that constitutes the unauthorized practice of law.

Associate in Science (AS) Degrees

Sociology (SOC)

The associate’s degree in Sociology is designed for students planning to earn at least a bachelor’s degree in Sociology. The program’s curriculum is also an excellent choice for students who desire a more comprehensive understanding of social group behavior, as well as those who plan to practice in one of the social science professions. Concentration in the curriculum develops student understanding of group dynamics, social interactions, including their genesis and evolution and environmental factors that shape human perceptions and behavior. The curriculum focus is not only paramount to learning the theories, skills, practices and values required for transfer to a bachelor’s degree-bearing program, but also develops students’ analytical skills and provides them with an enriched educational experience.

DCCC Paralegal Program Student

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Municipal Police Academy, Certificate (MPT)

All students successfully completing this certificate will earn thirty-six (36) credits, an ACT 120 certificate and be eligible to begin work as a Municipal Police Officer

Paralegal Studies, Certificate of Proficiency (CPLG)

The Paralegal Studies, Certificate of Proficiency Program can only be completed by individuals who hold an associate or bachelor’s degree, as this is an advanced certificate. If you do not hold one of these degrees, we invite you to select our Associates in Applied Science, Paralegal Studies.

This program is approved by The American Bar Association (ABA). The Certificate in Paralegal Studies is intended to provide graduates with a strong foundation in the areas of legal research and writing, contracts, torts, criminal law and property law. Graduates are likely to find employment as paralegals under the direction of attorneys (to do otherwise would be practicing law without a license) in law firms, legal departments of large corporations, insurance companies, title companies, legal service companies and federal, state or local courts and governmental agencies.

Unauthorized Practice Law: No person shall engage or assist a person who is not a member of the bar in the performance of activities that constitute the unauthorized practice of law.

Spanish for the Professions 1, Certificate (SPA1)

This certificate is designed for learners interested in acquiring basic Spanish language skills that will prepare them to communicate in basic Spanish professionally and as supplementary preparation for many professional fields, such as paralegal, early childhood education, and business.  

Spanish for the Professions 2, Certificate (SPA2)

This certificate is designed for learners interested in acquiring intermediate Spanish Language skills that will prepare them to communicate at an intermediate level in professional Spanish and as supplementary preparation for many professional fields, such as paralegal, early childhood education, and business.

Trauma Studies, Certificate of Competency (TSC)

The Trauma Studies 15-25 college-credit certificate program provides students, paraprofessionals, and professionals with the skills to recognize trauma and understand trauma outcomes and societal response to trauma, across disciplines.

A Certificate of Competency in Trauma Studies will be awarded upon completion of this curriculum with a 2.0 GPA and a “C” or better in all five Trauma Studies courses.

Chief Bair, DCCC Police Academy

View full A-Z Course List

ADJ - Administration of Justice

ADJ 101  Introduction to Criminal Justice  

A study of the agencies, processes and people involved in the criminal justice administration. Legislatures, law enforcement, prosecutor and defense counsel, courts, corrections and private security are studied with respect to function, role and the problems of justice administration in a democratic society, with emphasis on intercomponent relations, checks and balances, and discretionary powers.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe how the criminal law changes to help achieve the social order in our society.
Evaluate the historical contributions to our present Anglo-American system of justice.
Evaluate the various theories that have been proposed relative to crime as a social phenomenon.
Identify, explain and evaluate the current process of each element of the criminal justice system in terms of their stated goals: crime prevention, arrest, prosecution and rehabilitation of the offender.
Evaluate the historical contributions of Great Britain to our present American system of law enforcement and describe its major impact on the role, function, authority and mission of the US Criminal Justice System.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 110  Criminal Law  

Criminal Law, the foundation upon which the Criminal Justice System is built, encompasses theoretical concepts from sociology, psychology, political science, philosophy, theology and economics. It affects both the people it serves and those employed by the Criminal Justice System. The legal foundations of the U. S. Criminal Justice System are introduced to the student. Criminal offenses outlined by criminal statutes are examined with specific attention to the Pennsylvania Criminal Code.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the importance of the criminal law in maintaining social order.
Describe the basic components of the Criminal Justice System.
Analyze the concept of criminal liability.
Define the elements of specific crimes.
Recognize the requirements of various Pennsylvania criminal statutes.
Identify the liabilities of individuals convicted of criminal violations.
Identify and apply the most frequently used substantive defenses to charges of criminal acts.
Investigate the impact of the US Constitution to the Criminal Justice System.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 111  Criminal Procedure  

This course gives the justice student an opportunity to explore the living law of the U.S. Constitution, and Federal and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania statutory law and their impact on the process of administration of justice. The course examines the powers and limitations of power as defined in the first seven Articles; the concept of federalism and the powers reserved to the states; and a detailed examination of the Bill of Rights guarantees and their applicability to federal and state rules of criminal procedure through the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the rights of the citizen in a legal proceeding.
Provide an overview of the justice process and identify the Constitutional guarantees applicable at each step.
Understand the laws of search and seizure, arrest, interrogation and Identification Procedures.
Explain the impact of the Exclusionary Rule of Evidence and its impact on the criminal investigation.
Apply the Constitutional guarantees and limitations of the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th Amendments to the adjudicatory process.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 120  Principles of Investigation  

As an introduction to criminal investigations, this course is designed to serve students seeking careers in law enforcement, courts and corrections as well as private security. It includes professional conduct at the crime scene, interviews and interrogations of witnesses and suspects, the use of informants, the techniques of surveillance and presentation of the case in a court of law.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the history and development of criminal investigation.
Develop the concept of investigative leads based on information uncovered during the investigative process.
Analyze the various procedures used in gathering and handling evidence at the crime scene.
Discuss the impact of Supreme Court decisions on the ability to gather information in the investigative process and preparation of information for court testimony.

Prerequisites: ADJ 101.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 190  Administration of Justice Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit

ADJ 194  Administration of Justice Internship (2 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

2 Credits

ADJ 199  Administration of Justice Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. NOTE: To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 202  Terrorism  

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of international and domestic terrorism. It will examine the social, political, religious and global issues of terrorism. It will also provide students with the methods and strategies of various terrorist groups as well as the impact of terrorism on US Law Enforcement agencies, the US Court System, and the international community.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Summarize the various definitions and typologies of both international and domestic terrorism.
Examine the major historical and political causes of terrorism.
Identify the major international and domestic terrorist organizations.
Outline the major reasons why the US has become a target of terrorism.
Describe the global impact of terrorism on social, economic, and political levels.
Explain strategies and the tactics utilized by Law Enforcement and the international community in response to terrorism.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 203  Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice  

This course provides the advanced Administration of Justice student a focus on the leading issues confronting the various elements of the justice system, to research and develop possible remedies to address these issues, and to assist the student in making intelligent career decisions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Defend a position on the decriminalization of victimless crimes.
Evaluate the merit of the several states individually defining crime and punishment.
Justify uniformity in the standards, policies and procedures of our state justice systems.
Detail the advantages and disadvantages of plea negotiation (bargaining).
Evaluate the creation of a public service office entirely separate from the police force to provide social and human services.
Summarize the major issues involved in police prosecutor and court "discretionary powers".
Depict the supervisory and enforcement functions of the probation/parole office.
Analyze the current treatment of the youthful offender and suggest more viable alternatives.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 225  Ethics in Criminal Justice  

This course is designed to examine the professional standards of conduct and the acceptable forms of behavior within organizations in the criminal justice system. Issues concerning corruptions, perjury, false reporting, accepting of gratuities, excessive force and the code of silence will be examined. Personal and organizational integrity will be emphasized in this course.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define codes of conduct based on law.
Identify personal beliefs as a source of conduct.
Define social customs and its role in behavioral constraint.
Identify philosophical-logical systems that define ethics.
Organize a systematic way of clarifying ethical decisions.
Understand the role of professional codes of ethics.
Identify professional issues within the context of ethics.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 240  Criminology  

An examination of the field of criminology, including classical and contemporary theories, nature and causes of crime and criminal behavior. Patterns of criminal behavior, including property crimes, violent crimes, organized crime, white-collar crime, and victimless crime are discussed. A critical assessment of criminal justice system and its ability to respond to crime as a social problem is conducted.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Differentiate between the legal and non-legal definitions of crime and the criminal.
Identify the various indices of crime in America.
Trace the historical evolution of law and crime in western societies from a private to a public concern.
Explain the major theories of crime causation.
Identify the components, roles and functions of the criminal justice system in terms of the sociology of law and the administration of justice.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 241  Criminal Law, Procedure, and Adjudication  

This course examines the historical background, traditions, and legal principles and foundations of the Criminal Justice System. Both differences and similarities inherent within the Federal and State court processes are analyzed and the procedures through which the Criminal Justice System upholds the rights and liberties of all, both victims and accused will be examined. The roles of all professionals within the Criminal Justice System will be explored. The powers and limitations of power in the Criminal Justice System demanded by the Bill of Rights and the due process clause of the U.S. constitution. An emphasis on Criminal Law will also be examined.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Trace the history of the criminal courts from their respective foundations within English-based common law to the contemporary models that currently underlie judicial processes at both state and federal laws.
Identify the fundamental philosophies, legal concepts, and terminology that underlie the contemporary American court system.
Discuss and explain the import of individual constitutional and statutory rights upon the criminal justice system in the United States.
Identify, examine and understand the respective professional roles of those persons who work within the criminal court system as well as those impacted by the court system: victims, defendants, and the general public.
Discuss the major issues impacting upon the criminal court systems of today, and project how such issues will likely affect the criminal courts in the future.
Understand and explain the procedural processes utilized by the American criminal court system.

Prerequisites: ADJ 101 and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 250  Policing in America  

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the history and evolution of policing in the United States. It will provide students with a view of police power at the federal, state and local levels of law enforcement and will focus on contemporary issues in policing including administration and management, policing in democracy, and community policing within the confines of existing laws. It will address officer training, use of force, investigative methods, police discretion, and corruption.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the historical development of policing in America.
Understand the limits of police power in the United States.
Recognize the varying responsibilities of the police at the federal, state, and local levels of law enforcement.
Analyze the role of community policing, its strengths and limitations.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of social diversity in policing in America.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 260  Corrections-Probation-Parole  

This course exposes students to the process of corrections-probation and parole. It includes an in-depth study of the historical evolution of the institutions, functions, organization and problems from antiquity to the present as well as the attendant philosophies of justice and punishment. Probation and parole as integral parts of the corrections process, and the two major rehabilitative techniques are discussed separately.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the various theories that have been proposed relative to crime causality.
Identify and apply the various bases for corrections.
Trace the development of the correctional system in the United States.
Evaluate the rationale that corrections is one of society's agencies of social control that attempts to rehabilitate or neutralize criminal and delinquent behavior.
Identify and resolve the philosophical differences between custody and treatment of the offender.
Explore and analyze the various career opportunities within the corrections process.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 261  The Youthful Offender  

An in-depth study of factors that relate to juvenile delinquency, prevention, treatment and control; a multi-disciplinary orientation. The most popular interdisciplinary issues, ideas, principles and assumptions pertaining to delinquency are presented, as well as the duties, responsibilities and functions of the agencies in the criminal justice system that deal with the juvenile delinquent.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Trace the history of the development of the concept of the delinquent child from World War II to the present.
Demonstrate that delinquency has social, psychological and legal causes.
Identify, describe and justify the major programs and processes that have been established by delinquency law.
Analyze the concept of the Youth Services Bureau.
Evaluate the legally required and discretionary responses of law enforcement agencies when dealing with the juvenile.
Trace the juvenile justice process from police contact through the various stages of intake, pre-disposition investigation, the family court hearings, disposition and confinement.
Analyze the strengths and weakness of incarcerating the adjudicated delinquent.
Assess the value of present after-care strategies.
Evaluate contemporary and future issues relevant to delinquency.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 262  U.S. Courts: Contemporary Issues and Problems  

This course provides students, particularly students of criminal justice, an overview of the legal basis, structure, organization, policies and jurisdiction of the U.S. courts. The course examines the dynamics of the U.S. courthouse, the interaction of the key participants and the quality of justice dispensed there. Finally, contemporary issues and problems such as judicial discretion, sentencing, political influence, plea negotiation, and the usurpation of the lawmaking process and power by the courts through judicial review are presented from both a philosophical and applied perspective.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the pivotal role of the courts in justice administration.
Provide an overview of the legal bases of the criminal courts, criminal procedure and criminal law.
Identify and evaluate the actors who, on a daily basis, must make the critical decisions through ministerial duties and discretionary powers to further social ordering in the US courts.
List the most common functions of US judges.
Follow the stages through which a criminal case must pass from arrest to the verdict and explain how and why cases leave the process.
Identify the competing theories of sentencing and discuss the legal basis for the wide range of discretionary power over sentencing by the judge.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ADJ 280  Organized Crime  

A foundation course in systematic criminality that addresses those organizations whose method of operation includes fear, violence and corruption to achieve strategic and financial goals. These organizations are highly structured and staffed by hard-core, disciplined career criminals operating in secrecy and anonymity through the legal, quasi-legal and criminal activities. Governmental agencies responsible for investigating organized crime as well as legal sanctions employed by these agencies will also be examined.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define Organized Crime.
Explain the history of organized crime in America.
Identify and explain the areas of influence employed by organized crime.
Prepare an overview of the international impact of organized crime.
Discuss the tactical and strategic response of governmental entities to counter the influence of organized crime.

Prerequisites: ADJ 241.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT - Municipal Police Academy

MPT 100  Introduction to Law Enforcement  

This course teaches the police candidate the role of a police officer in the community. It defines police power and authority, the potential impact of its misuse on the community as well as social control. Understanding the function of the police within the context of the United States Constitution will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explicate the social control of police behavior.
Describe and apply principles of police discretionary conduct.
Analyze and describe the role of personal and professional conduct.
Describe the place of police in our society.
Show the relationship of police conduct to an ethical code.
Detail the difference between civil and criminal behavior.
Describe the role of public and community relations in police work.
Delineate the role of law and administration of law in our society.
Depict penology in Pennsylvania.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 101  Professional Development  

This course teaches appropriate skills for the maintenance of mental and physical well-being and appropriate professional standards of conduct. It provides relevant theory and instruction numerous areas such as the elements of physical fitness and its relationship to police work. Moreover, the physical and psychological benefits of physical fitness and the importance of establishing a healthy lifestyle in specific areas of physical training, nutrition and weight control will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the use of force continuum and explain its levels, constraints and cues.
Identify circumstances where use of non-deadly force is authorized by law.
Identify circumstances where use of deadly force is authorized by law.
Demonstrate techniques used to subdue persons using locks, grips, holds, etc.
Describe stress-inducing situations that can affect the conduct of individual police officers.
Depict police leadership traits and techniques.
Analyze psychological barriers to confrontation by police of their own emotional and psychological problems.
Describe the effect on an officer's emotional state when exercising police power and authority.
Demonstrate physical conditioning by performing push-ups, sit-ups, and a mile and one-half run, weight-lifting and sit-and-reach exercises.

4 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 2 Weekly Lab Hours

MPT 102  Law and Procedures  

This course teaches the police officer candidate to recognize and cite Pennsylvania criminal statutes, the rules of criminal procedures and applicable Constitutional provisions. Distinctions between criminal and civil law, federal, state and local statutes will be thoroughly addressed. In addition, topics of discussion will include, but will not be limited to, understanding the basic laws and rules that govern the power, authority, and jurisdiction of police officers in Pennsylvania.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the US.
and Pennsylvania Constitution provisions that provide the legal basis for the exercise of police power.
Provide the legal basis for the exercise of police power.
Recognize and cite provisions of Pennsylvania statutes that define criminal conduct.
Apply rules and statutory provisions for arrest, search warrants, electronic surveillance and bail.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 103  Law and Procedures II  

This course is a continuation of Law and Procedures I which teaches the police officer candidate to recognize and cite Pennsylvania criminal statute, the rules of criminal procedures and applicable Constitutional provisions. Instruction in this course will be on theory and skills associated with the significant steps in the arrest, post-arrest, pretrial, trial and post-trial processes.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize and cite provisions of the Mental Health Act, Protection from Abuse Act, Liquor Control Act, and Crime Victims Compensation Act.
Identify major provisions of the Controlled Substance Act pertinent to their enforcement capacity.
Identify the major provisions of the cell phone laws.
Recognize provisions of environmental laws, safety concerns, and jurisdictional issues.
Identify circumstances when a search incident to arrest is authorized.
Describe a suppression hearing.
Identify ethical considerations in search and seizure.
Identify consequences of conducting an unlawful search.
Define the legal requirements to search a person, house, etc.
Define a lawful frisk.

Prerequisites: MPT 102.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 104  Vehicle Code  

This course is designed to provide the student with relevant theory and skills in analyzing the provisions of the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code and decisions of operating under the influence detection. Sources of standards for armed pedestrian behavior and the function of law enforcement within the context of the highway transportation system will be defined.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply appropriate provisions of the Motor Vehicle Code to specific factual situations.
Demonstrate procedures for breath, urine and/or chemical tests to determine the presence of alcohol or controlled substances.
Differentiate applicable provisions of the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code and the Criminal Code.
Detail the role of PennDOT and traffic safety enforcement.
Cite provisions of the Motor Vehicle Code for issuing citations and arresting individuals for code violations.

2 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 105  Motor Vehicle Collision Inspection and Related Issues  

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the relationship of the cause and analysis of vehicle collisions. Proper identification and documentation of physical evidence as it relates to collisions upon the highway, as well as collision scene, traffic direction and control will also be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define reportable and non-reportable, traffic and non-traffic motor vehicle collisions.
Perform the proper sequence of action at collision scene.
Recognize appropriate legal requirements pertaining to the need to complete state traffic collision reports.
Utilize proper search technique for physical evidence at collision scene.
Specify proper method for measuring skid marks based on type and extent of skid.
Identify the term hazardous materials.
Define why hazardous materials are a problem and who has to deal with them.
Apply PennDOT basic safety guidelines.

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

MPT 106  Patrol Procedures and Operations  

This course presents the principles of police patrol procedures and operations as the foundation at any police department. It introduces the student to the mental preparation necessary to effectively perform duties and function as a patrol officer.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply standard accepted principles of police patrol.
Detail incident procedures for vehicular accidents and violations as well as apprehension of suspects.
Specify arrest, impounding, and security procedures applicable to patrol activities.
Define human relations skills applicable to patrol procedures.
Delineate Miranda warnings requirements.
Identify purposes and procedures for safe roadblocks.
Identify markings and colors common to gangs in Pennsylvania.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 107  Principles of Criminal Investigation  

This course is designed to present basic principles of criminal procedures. It defines the role of a responding officer at the scene of a police event as well as, demonstrates the technical capacity to effectively conduct crime scene management preliminary investigations and other patrol-related investigations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define a preliminary investigation.
Identify the general unreliability of eyewitness identification and steps to make such identifications more reliable.
Coordinate and apply methods of establishing value of stolen and recovered property.
Demonstrate proper procedures for conducting the initial investigation of rape, sexual assault, and sex crimes.
Recognize the most common forms of drugs.
Define proper surveillance techniques.
Apply principles of preliminary, crime site and follow-up investigation.
List applicable rules of evidence.
Detail applicable procedures to protect crime sites and to preserve evidence.
Perform principles of interview and interrogation.
Differentiate criminal investigation from civil investigation.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 200  Human Relations  

This course introduces the basic principles by which students can improve their observation skills and perceptions of human behavior. Other topics addressed are sensitivity issues and how people react to authority. The importance of understanding cultural differences and ethnic intermediation will be addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
List and describe basic universal aspects of the communication process.
Identify the impact of role awareness, reference groups and motivation of human behavior.
Apply proper procedures for conducting initial investigation of bias/hate crimes.
Process legal requirements regarding emergency detention of a mentally ill person.
Categorize necessary information to be presented in an oral statement.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 202  Crisis Management  

This course enhances the students ability to make judgments and understand the various elements of juvenile crime and the juvenile criminal justice system. To enable students to understand how to bring a dispute under control will be defined. This course will also teach behavioral skills necessary for the successful and positive resolution of dispute situations. The ability to identify and learn the necessary skills for conflict management will be thoroughly addressed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply Constitutional and other legal requirements for arresting an individual or taking the individual into custody.
Specify and demonstrate procedures required for arrest of individuals and for searches of those taken into custody.
Delineate unique problems involved in the detention of mentally ill, emotionally unstable and physically handicapped individuals.
Describe and apply principles for use of force in arrest and custody situations.
List procedures for extricating hostages and responding to prisoner escapes.
Identify proper safety procedures before entering a dispute.
Identify the scope of and the authority of the Juvenile Court.
Define juvenile delinquent, child in need of supervision and runaway.
Define elements of the Domestic Violence Act.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 204  Firearms  

This course is designed to teach police officer candidates the fundamentals of proper use of firearms. The course incorporates application of the tactical and decision-making skills necessary for them to apply this critical skill in actual situations to protect themselves and the public from harm.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply safety rules when using firearms.
Illustrate proper procedures for use of pistols, shotguns and holsters.
Define deadly and non-deadly force applications.
Identify basic principles of ballistics.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 205  Operation of Patrol Vehicles  

This course is designed to teach the skills necessary for safe operation of police vehicles. Students will be well-versed in the control and handling of an emergency response vehicle. Mastery of the principles of safe driving coupled with refinement in driving skills under adverse and simulated emergency conditions will sharpen the students driving reactions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Operate police vehicles under normal and emergency circumstances.
Describe and analyze an officers responsibilities for civil and/or criminal penalty in case of police vehicle accident.
Demonstrate skills for safe driving and pursuit of fleeing individuals or vehicles.
Detail proper vehicle protection systems.

2 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 206  Report Writing and Case Preparation  

This course is designed to teach and demonstrate evaluation techniques for accurately recording an incident report. The course enables students to identify the characteristics essential to a good report as well as check for completeness and accuracy.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply techniques of listening and one-on-one communication.
Apply rules to prepare police officers as witnesses.
Illustrate written reports and note-taking skills.
Demonstrate public communication as a police officer through prepared speeches, testimony, and extemporaneous talks.
Perform proper procedures of notification to a victims family of death or injury.
Specify communication techniques for emergency notification.
Identify characteristics as essential to a good report.
Define the purpose of the law of evidence.

2 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours

MPT 207  Emergency Response Training  

This course trains the police officer candidate to provide immediate emergency care prior to arrival of paramedical aid to the site. It provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to work as a first responder in an emergency to help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until additional medical help arrives.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply principles of emergency medical care to crisis situations.
List emergency medical problems confronted by police officers.
Detail procedures for obstetrical emergencies.
Stipulate procedures for care of AIDS patients and protection of officers.

3 Credits2 Weekly Lecture Hours
 1 Weekly Lab Hour

MPT 208  Handling Arrested Persons  

This course introduces the police officer candidate to emergency case management of disorderly mentally ill, criminal or psychologically distraught individuals. The course also covers officer safety and strategy in preparing and pre-planning in an arrest. In addition, it familiarizes the student with the parts and operational mechanisms and use of handcuffs and teaches safe and efficient transport of individuals placed in custody.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe various violent and dangerous situations, more particularly those involving domestic disputes, mentally ill individuals, and violent criminals.
Recognize and describe mental illness.
Detail suicide and hostage-taking events.
Analyze and apply principles of response to dangerous, potentially dangerous, or hostile crisis situations.
Apply proper procedures to conduct field search of arrested persons.
Identify proper procedure to handcuff suspects or prisoners.

1 Credit1 Weekly Lecture Hour

PLG -Paralegal Studies

PLG 100  Introduction to the Paralegal Profession  

This course provides an overview of the paralegal profession while focusing on the role of the paralegal in the legal profession, the legal and ethical rules that determine unauthorized practice of law, and key legal terminology used in the profession. While developing critical thinking and legal reasoning skills, students will be introduced to such concepts as common law, constitutional foundation in the American legal system, federalism, and differences between the federal and state court systems.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the role of the paralegal in trial preparation and proceedings, and settlement negotiations.
Describe and analyze the situations of unauthorized practice of law both from the ethical and legal point of view and other relevant legal issues.
Identify the different government structures and judicial courts at the federal, state, and local level.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 110  Legal Research and Writing I  

This course introduces basic legal research and writing skills. Students are taught the basics of researching issues of substantive and procedural law as well as how to draft basic legal documents. This course also introduces students to traditional law library resources, such as Black’s Law Dictionary, U.S. Code, the Pennsylvania Code, Federal Reporter, Pennsylvania Reporter, Atlantic Reporter, and legal treatises. In addition, students will learn about online research sources including Lexis® and the official federal and Pennsylvania State Courts websites. Students need to obtain a C or higher in the course in order to take any course that requires PLG 110 as a prerequisite.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Differentiate between the various sources and methods used to research the law.
Conduct and identify different methods of legal research.
Identify and analyze legal issues.
Use critical thinking to apply the law to facts presented in hypothetical case scenarios.
Write legal memoranda that demonstrates an understanding of legal issues.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.

Corequisites: PLG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 120  Legal Research and Writing II  

This course builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in Legal Research and Writing I to research substantive and legal issues with more complexity and greater depth. Students will draft more intricate and varied legal documents including different forms of discovery, motions, and memoranda in support, orders, trial briefs, final pretrial orders, and appellate briefs. NOTE: Prerequisites: PLG 120 with grade "C" or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply principles of legal research and writing to drafting discovery documents, motions, memoranda of law, trial and appellate briefs, and various other legal documents.
Properly format legal documents and cite legal references.
Compose written communications with attorneys, courts, and clients.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.

Prerequisites: PLG 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 130  Technology in the Law  

This course is a general introduction to the use and the application of legal specialty software programs in the modern practice of law. Covers law office applications of client management software, billing software, LexisNexis® Academic, and various state and federal websites. Students will use appropriate software to perform client conflicts checks, for timekeeping and file management, to prepare and maintain a database for each client, to organize and safeguard documentary evidence, and to assist during trial preparation and trial.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and use productivity software applicable to various business and legal environments.
Comprehend the impact of modern technologies on law office and courtroom procedures and apply such technologies and management software to assigned hypothetical legal work and tasks.
Apply the relevant computer software and applications applicable to legal environments.
Apply communication and collaboration applications commonly used in the legal and business environments.
Identify the ethical and privacy issues that arise from the use of technology and the law.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 140  Contract Law  

This course provides in-depth analysis of contract law including contract formation and the elements of an enforceable contract, rights and obligations of the parties to a contract, contract performance and discharge, elements of breach of contract, defenses to a claim of breach, remedies for breach, implied-in-law contracts, implied-in-fact contracts, promissory estoppels, and secured transactions. Included in the course is a study of the Sales and Commercial paper provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Specific contracts that are subject to much litigation are examined and discussed. Application of contract drafting techniques will be stressed. Ethical issues related directly to contract law will be discussed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the elements of a contract.
Discuss relevant ethical and constitutional issues.
Compare and/or contrast different contractual agreements.
Explain the various modes of discharging a contract and the remedies available for breach of contract.
Analyze and draft contracts that comply with the provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code with emphasis on Article 2 (Sales) and Article 3 (Commercial Paper).

Corequisites: PLG 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 197  Paralegal Practicum and Legal Ethics  

This course is specifically designed for part-time/evening students that need to satisfy the internship requirement for the Paralegal Studies Program, and will meet in a traditional classroom setting. As with the traditional internship, there are two components to this course. The first component involves a practicum where students work directly under the direction and supervision of an attorney and/or experienced paralegal in a traditional classroom setting. In a controlled environment, students will learn how to interview clients, prepare and monitor client files, set up interview schedules, and perform various administrative duties relating to practical work operations in a legal office. The second component covers the fundamental principles governing the ethical practice of law for both lawyers and paralegals. In addition, this segment of the course provides students with the necessary tools to identify and resolve ethical problems as well as provide practical tips to implement in everyday practice. Students will also examine the rules of ethics peculiar to the practice of law and the crucial role they play in the profession of a paralegal. This course cover the regulation of the legal profession, the unauthorized practice of law, client confidentially, conflicts of interest, advertising and solicitation, client fees and fee sharing, and specific examples of Pennsylvania’s Rules of Professional Conduct. NOTE: Need to obtain Director of Paralegal Studies approval and "C" or better in prerequisites.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop professional level skills in oral and written communications.
Develop a first-hand understanding of law-related office organizations and their internal systems, such as for timekeeping, billing and file management.
Acquire a sound, contextual understanding of legal and professional ethics, including, but not limited to, regarding client confidentiality, conflict of interest, and the unauthorized practice of the law.
Create a portfolio of work samples (or writing samples).

Prerequisites: PLG 110 and PLG 120 and PLG 140 and PLG 210 and PLG 240.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 199  Paralegal Experience and Legal Ethics  

This course is designed for the day/full-time students that need to satisfy the internship requirement for the Paralegal Studies Program. There are two components to this course. The first component involves an internship with a local law firm, corporate law department, government agency, or non-profit. With the assistance of the Director of Paralegal Studies and the Office of Student Employment Services and Coops, students will need to secure an internship. Students are required to intern a minimum of 180 hours in the paralegal field. The second component requires students to meet one hour per week to discuss job related issues and cover the fundamental principles governing the ethical practice of law for both lawyers and paralegals. In addition, this segment of the course provides students with the necessary tools to identify and resolve ethical problems as well as provide practical tips to implement in everyday practice. Students will also examine the rules of ethics peculiar to the practice of law and the crucial role they play in the profession of a paralegal. This course covers the regulation of the legal profession, the unauthorized practice of law, client confidentiality, conflicts of interest, advertising and solicitation, client fees and fee sharing, and specific examples of Pennsylvania’s Rules of Professional Conduct. NOTE: Prerequisites: PLG 110 and PLG 120 with grades "C" or better, PLG 140, PLG 210, and PLG 240. Need to obtain Director of Paralegal Studies approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop professional level skills in oral and written communications.
Develop a first-hand understanding of law-related office organizations and their internal systems, such as for timekeeping, billing, and file management.
Acquire a sound, contextual understanding of legal and professional ethics, including, but not limited to, regarding client confidentiality, conflict of interest, and the unauthorized practice of the law.
Create a portfolio of work samples (or writing samples).

Prerequisites: PLG 110 and PLG 120 and PLG 140 and PLG 210 and PLG 240.

4 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour

PLG 200  Family Law  

This course introduces students to the procedural and substantive law affecting the family and domestic relations. The law affecting prenuptial agreements, post-nuptial agreements, separation, divorce, spousal support, alimony, spousal abuse, custody, child support, and adoption is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of relevant legal documents and procedures for filing.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the basic principles of family and domestic relations law.
Research family law and domestic relations issues.
Analyze specific divorce remedies.
Prepare legal documents applicable to court rules and regulations in a family or domestic relations case.
Discuss the role of human relations, emotional sensitivity, in domestic relations cases.
Discuss the relevant ethical issues.
Apply relevant modern technologies.

Prerequisites: PLG 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 210  Civil Litigation and Tort Principles  

This course focuses on the applications of the principles of tort law and civil litigation, and emphasizes the paralegal's role in the civil and litigation process. Students will receive a thorough overview of the applicable constitutional issues that arise in tort law, rules of civil procedure, and rules of evidence as well as an introduction to different resolution methods available through the state and federal court systems; in particular, alternative dispute resolution methods applicable to negligence cases. Lastly, this course provides students with the necessary foundation to prepare and write pleadings and other applicable court documents, prepare for discovery, and assemble proper documentation for trial. NOTE: Prerequisites: PLG 120 with grade "C" or better and PLG 140*. * Course marked with a star may be taken concurrently with Director of PLG approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Conduct legal research of basic negligence liability concepts applied to various intentional and unintentional torts and the applicable defenses, and then use critical thought to analyze the results of such research.
Comprehend fundamental constitutional issues surrounding tort law.
Discuss the theories of damage recovery applicable to tort matters.
Discuss negligence problem resolution through court litigation and alternative remedies of negotiation, arbitration, and mediation, as well as the paralegal’s role in each scenario.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.

Prerequisites: PLG 120.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 211  Civil Litigation and Tort Applications  

This course focuses on the application of the principles of tort law and civil litigation learned in Civil Litigation and Tort Principles, with an emphasis placed on deepening the student's understanding of the paralegal’s role in the civil and litigation process. Students will be taught the role of the paralegal in writing briefs and researching the law in the trial and appellate process. In addition, students will learn how to properly prepare and draft appellate briefs and other documents to be filed with an appellate court.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Accurately apply Court Rules of Civil Procedure and rules of evidence when filing and drafting trial and appellelate court documents.
Prepare and write pleadings and other documents with trial court practice.
Prepare and draft appellate briefs.

Prerequisites: PLG 210.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 220  Real Estate Law  

This course provides an introduction to real-property law. Emphasis is placed on real estate fundamentals, material devoted to the legal concepts of ownership, the laws that govern real estate transactions, and material that discusses brokerage and related activities. In addition, this course examines the tasks performed by lawyers and their representatives in representing buyers and sellers in the transfer of real property interest and the relationships of between landlords and tenants. Discussion and analysis of real-property law includes possession, ownership and transfer of real property, land-use controls, environmental issues, contracts, agreements and financing, federal and state laws and regulations, taxes and liens, land title issues, ethics, and the business of real estate. NOTE: Prerequisites: PLG 140*. * Course marked with a star may be taken concurrently with Director of PLG approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Analyze the basic principles of property law.
Apply principles of real property law to the preparation of forms common to real estate transactions.
Discuss relevant ethical and constitutional issues.

Prerequisites: PLG 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 230  Estates, Trusts and Wills  

This is a task-oriented course that emphasizes the terminology, forms and procedures of probate and estate administration. Students also learn to draft a simple trust and a will.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
List and describe the duties of an estate paralegal.
Construct a family tree for the decedent and determine which of the decedent's surviving relatives are entitled to share (and to what degree) in the decedent's estate.
Gather necessary information to complete and file petitions for Letters.
Apply the rules concerning advertising of the grant of Letters and identify the reasons for and advantages of advertising.
Complete the renunciation form.
Gather information, complete and file inventory.
Identify and differentiate between various grounds for contesting a will.
Calculate the surviving spouse's elective share.
Identify and differentiate between survival actions and wrongful death options.
Gather information, complete and file various State and Federal tax returns.
Draft and file a basic accounting with the Probate Court.
Draft and file Satisfaction of Reward/Receipts and Releases.
Identify procedures for handling small estates and ancillary administration.
Draft a simple trust.
Apply relevant modern technologies.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.

Prerequisites: PLG 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 240  Criminal Law and Procedure  

This criminal law and procedure course introduces the foundations of criminal law and rules of criminal procedure. Students will be introduced to the elements of crimes against persons and property as well as legal defenses to criminal prosecution. This course also covers evidentiary issues and constitutional concerns, along with pretrial considerations and procedures, trial, sentencing, punishment, and appellate review. There is an emphasis placed on the preparation of legal documents relevant to criminal cases and the proper preparation of case files.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the basic principles of criminal law.
Prepare legal documents relevant to criminal cases and procedures.
Prepare a case file that requires documentation of key facts, and the maintenance and organization of applicable case file documents.
Identify ethical and constitutional law issues.

Corequisites: PLG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 241  Administrative Law  

This course introduces the paralegal student to the laws involving administration of government by various departments, agencies, boards and commissions that implement and enforce government law and policy. The student will be taught to laws and procedures affecting the administrative decision-making processes on a local, state and federal government level.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the scope and application of Administrative Law.
Describe the constitutional and statutory legal bases of administrative law and administration agencies on a local, state and federal level of government.
Describe and analyze the rules, procedures and practices of government departments, agencies, boards and commissions for making rules, conducting hearings and making decisions.
Describe and analyze the scope of authority and jurisdiction for various governmental departments, agencies, boards and commissions.
Analyze the administrative, quasi-legislative and quasi-judicial functions of administrative departments.
Analyze the role of legislative body, courts, statutory limits on governmental immunity and the constitution in limiting the exercise of power and authority by state, federal, and local government departments, agencies, boards and commissions.
Analyze the procedures to be followed pursuant to specific statutes: Workmen's Compensation Act for Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Public Utility Commission; Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs; Securities Commission; and the Human Relations Commission.
Analyze the procedures to be followed with regard to the US Social Security Administration (claims and appeals); various environmental protection statutes; acts involving wages and benefits; various labor protection acts; acts that prohibit discrimination, viz, Equal Pay Act, Age Discrimination Employment Act, Civil Rights Act, Title VII.
Analyze the procedures to be followed with regard to local zoning, licensing, and building codes.
Describe statutes that protect the public from the government including Freedom of Information Acts, Sunshine Laws (including municipal sunshine laws) and Privacy acts.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.
Apply relevant modern technologies.

Prerequisites: PLG 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 242  Business Organizations  

This course focuses on the law of business organizations. Emphasis in the course is on corporations from formation to dissolution.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Differentiate between a sole proprietorship and different types of partnerships.
Create a corporation and identify the characteristics of a corporation that make it an important and separate legal entity.
Describe the financial structure of a corporation.
Describe the formalities of the operation of a corporation.
Differentiate between a corporation which operates in one state and multi-state corporations.
Describe the way in which corporate structure can be changed and the reasons that may precipitate such a change.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.
Apply relevant modern technologies.

Prerequisites: PLG 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 243  Bankruptcy Law  

This specialized paralegal course focuses on what the paralegal needs to know about bankruptcy. Emphasis is on the preparation of the various forms required in the processing of the different types of bankruptcy cases. Emphasis is also on learning the terminology applicable and unique to bankruptcy law.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the terminology applied to bankruptcy law and practice.
Investigate and prepare bankruptcy petitions and schedules.
Describe and prepare forms necessary to process a bankruptcy case.
Identify and describe in detail the ordinary steps in the process of filing and administering a bankruptcy case.
Identify the different types of bankruptcy proceedings and the forms necessary for filing each type.
Distinguish between personal bankruptcy and corporate bankruptcy.
Describe the effects of a bankruptcy filing on an individual and on a corporation.
Identify the exemptions which may be claimed in a bankruptcy.
Contrast the differences between a bankruptcy and a reorganization plan and be able to process them accordingly.
Find, analyze and follow the local bankruptcy court rules.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.
Apply relevant modern technologies.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 244  Labor and Employment Law  

This course focuses on the identification and application of laws regulating the interactions among employers, employees, and labor organizations representing employees. Emphasis is on the paralegal's role in labor contract negotiations, administrative and alternative dispute resolution proceedings concerning labor disputes, and the civil litigation process that arises from such disputes in both federal and state courts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and discuss the labor and employment laws applicable to employer/employee relationships.
Discuss the rules and procedures and evidence applicable to administrative proceedings, labor arbitration, and court proceedings involving labor disputes.
Describe the role of the paralegal in providing litigation support in administrative proceedings, arbitration, and court proceedings involving labor disputes.
Identify the role of the paralegal in providing support for collective bargaining negotiations.
Prepare and write contract negotiation proposals, grievances and demands for arbitration, unfair labor practice charges, employment discrimination claims, and post-arbitration letter briefs.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.
Apply relevant modern technologies.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and (MAT 040 or MAT 050). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PLG 246  Elder Law  

This course will cover various aspects of law that have particular application to the elderly client. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the practical and theoretical aspects of elder law. As more and more Americans age, legislators, jurists, and other legal professionals have to address the social and legal needs of the elderly including healthcare, employment, housing, guardianship, and elder abuse problems.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discuss the basic concept of the legal definition of "elder".
Evaluate the legislative responses to the aging population.
Discuss the various types of health care problems that face the elderly.
Discuss employment and income issues as they affect the elderly.
Analyze the various statutes that have been enacted to assist the elderly with housing problems.
Discuss the concept of guardianship.
Identify effective estate planning.
Analyze the concept of elder abuse and apply remedies for abuse.
Discuss the agencies that provide assistance to the elderly.
Discuss relevant ethical issues.
Apply relevant modern technologies.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL - Political Science

POL 110  Introduction to Political Science  

This course explores the fundamental concepts in the discipline of political science and the philosophical foundation of the American system of governments.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Distinguish between political philosophy and political science.
State and explain the basic issues addressed in the phi.
State and define the essential concepts in the discipline of political science.
Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophical foundations of the American system of government.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 120  American National Government  

American Government introduces students to the concepts, functions, and structures of the United States government. It undertakes an analysis of the U. S. national political system with a focus on the role of individuals in the governmental process, and the nature of the interactions that take place among the various branches and levels of government. Analysis will be made of civil rights and liberties that has maintained America as the most culturally diverse country in the world.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Assess the political economy and historical underpinnings of the American system to the principles that were purported.
Contrast the structure and organization of the executive, legislative, judiciary branches of government with the actual mechanisms of the system.
Analyze the struggle for civil liberties and civil rights.
Assess political factors and dynamics of democracy and actors within the system: citizens, political parties, interest groups, the media, and electoral process.
Examine public policies with regard to populations throughout history.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Corequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 130  American State and Local Government  

An analytical study of the powers, process and problems of American state, county and local governments. Careful consideration of the nature of political, legislative, administrative and judicial organization at the state, county and city level will be given. NOTE: Prerequisites: Students are encouraged to participate in civil, political and community activities in a democratic society.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
List the development of the six major historical periods in the evolution of American state and local government.
Define federalism and two other major forms of governmental structure.
Identify the nature, functions, structure and legal position of local government in American federalism.
Trace the structure, functions and problems of the three branches of American state government with emphasis on Pennsylvania.
Students are encouraged to participate in civil, political and community activities in a democratic society.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 140  American Presidency  

This course is designed to encourage, enhance and heighten student participation in our democratic society. American Presidency introduces students to the concepts, functions, and structures of the United States Constitution. It undertakes an analysis of the U. S. Presidents and their exercise of power, historically and in the present.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the forces and participants involved in the dynamics of the compromise of the Constitutional Convention, which shaped the establishment of an executive branch.
Identify the constitutional model and proper role of the president in the doctrine of separation of power.
Discuss the constitutional powers of the president that overlap within the other two branches.
Include some relevant and modern issues that are sources of controversy regarding their administration.
Trace the historical evolution of the president within the confines of the constitutional and non-constitutional functions of the office.
Critique the present method of nominating presidential candidates and election of the chief executive.
Identify those presidents who have made the most permanent contributions to the evolution of the office.
Explain the impact of television, campaign financing and the expectations of the American people toward the office of president.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 200  World Affairs  

This course deals with the theory and practice of international relations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the principle characteristics of national states.
Analyze the role of power in international politics.
Identify the major constraints a national state must deal with in the formulation and implementation of foreign policy.
Evaluate the relations between East and West in the post-World War I era.
Assess the impact of the United Nations on the relations between national states in the contemporary world.
Model appropriate strategies to acquire various methods for gathering information for the development, comprehension and practical application of said information in the deciphering of issues involved in world politics.
Relate the foundations of instruction to the practice of reading and interpreting texts at the secondary level.
Plan developmentally and culturally appropriate strategies to address individual differences among political adversaries.
Enrich interdisciplinary activities by incorporating innovative technology and multimedia activities.
Teach questioning and communication skills as an integral part of cultural development.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 210  Principles of Public Administration  

The general principles and theories of administration are analyzed and related to the management of public business.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Evaluate the trends and philosophies of bureaucracy in the public and private sectors.
Analyze the relationship of the public administrator to the various branches and levels of government and to the general public.
Describe the roles of the public administrator in terms of goal setting, organizational and personnel procedures, and financial management.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 211  Modern Political Theory  

The goal of Modern Political Theory is to examine the origin, purpose and role of current political thought and action. The European Renaissance in the 16th century to the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, produced a philosophical movement in Western thought, referred to as “modernity" that evolved from and coincides with the expansion of capitalism and imperialism. This class will expand on the modern classification and include contemporary thinkers, African descendants, and women through Feminist thought. Class discussions will challenge many presumptions about political life. In addition,the exploration of the major tenets of identifiable theorists will be applied to current societal thinking and actions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe key ideas such as order, human nature, freedom, justice, community, and equality that animated the great thinkers of ancient, medieval, and modern political thought.
Enumerate fundamental tenets of major ideologies and assess the impact of these ideologies in today’s political landscape.
Discern the continued relevance of historical ideas about government institutions and the citizenry to the present political landscape.

Prerequisites: POL 120.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 225  Constitutional Law  

This course introduces the student to the interpretation of the United States Constitution by the Supreme Court through a series of prominent decisions from leading cases. The parameters of the Courts power over the states will be established by analyzing the history of federalism. The Supreme Court's relationship to the executive and legislative branches will be ascertained by the role of the Court in determining the constitutionality of their actions. An examination of the rights of the citizenry will be investigated through the balancing tests between protecting the rights of the individual and the well being of society as a whole as evidenced in their decisions regarding such rights.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Discern the power relationships among branches of government (checks and balances) and between levels of government (federalism).
Analyze important constitutional provisions, historically critical Supreme Court decisions, as well as areas of contemporary interest.
Analyze the relationship between the government and its citizens, including restrictions on interference with individual freedom (civil liberties) and obligations to prevent discrimination and ensure equality (civil rights).
Assess the primary arguments made by advocates on most sides of the controversies surrounding the structure, organization and functioning of government.

Prerequisites: POL 120.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

POL 226  Comparative Politics  

This course will introduce students to the processes of World politics. The origin of international governments will be examined in addition to current issues and challenges that have evolved from that structure. The origins of both national and international governments will be assessed with particular focus given to the role of the economy within nation states. Emphasis will be placed the role of international organizations aimed at mediating affairs between international actors.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Examine how political systems are shaped by historical forces, political cultures, the international environment, economic conditions, ideologies, and the decisions of leaders and public participants in politics.
Compare institutions, electoral and voting processes, political systems, public policies, and political and economic development of different countries.
Assess the ways that ethnic, religious, and other minorities are affected by global decision making and power relations.
Apply scientific methodologies within the Political Science discipline, and construct typologies and assess political systems.

Prerequisites: POL 120.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY - Psychology

PSY 130  Personal and Career Development  

This course examines the theoretical and empirical issues related to personal growth and career development. The purpose of this course is to increase self-awareness, understand the career development process, and practice the ability to effect personal change. Emphasis is on self-awareness, personal growth, and career exploration that is examined theoretically and applied to the self and others in a diverse society. Content includes identity development, self-assessment, social influence, self-esteem, mindfulness, career development, and behavior change.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and apply the psychological theories fundamental to identity (self) development, personality, and behavioral change.
Demonstrate self-awareness by identifying their personality traits, interests, skills, and values.
Identify the factors that contribute to an individual’s career development and apply this knowledge to their own career choices.
Summarize psychological factors that can influence the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle.
Describe how coping strategies, including mindfulness, can be applied to everyday living.
Explain how individual differences and worldview may influence beliefs, values, and interaction with others and vice versa.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Corequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 140  General Psychology  

This course is a one-semester introduction to the basic principles and major theoretical approaches that are used to explain human behavior, with emphasis on understanding and application of such principles and theories as they relate to ourselves and our surroundings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the nature of psychology and describe the methods used by psychologists to study behavior.
Identify the major physiological structures involved in the study of behavior.
Identify the principles of sensation and perception.
Describe current theories of learning and thinking explaining their influence in education, life-span development, and other life situations.
Describe the major trends in explaining human emotion and motivation and how they are assessed.
Identify the major theories of human personality and development.
Evaluate the impact of major trends in analyzing ourselves, interpersonal and social relationships and the origins, classification and treatment of mental disorders.
Explain the relationship among physiology, perception, learning, cognition, motivation, and personality, applying them to understanding life situations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 190  Psychology Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

1 Credit

PSY 194  Psychology Internship (2 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

2 Credits

PSY 199  Psychology Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designated to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulated a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student’s program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 200  Personality Theories  

Emphasis in this course is on the understanding and application of basic concepts of psychodynamic, trait, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic-existential perspectives to personal and interpersonal functioning. Biological influences on personality are also considered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Detail the characteristics of psychodynamic theories.
Describe the Five-Factor and other trait approaches to personality.
Describe behavioral perspectives on personality.
Identify the characteristics of cognitive theories of personality.
Describe humanistic and existential personality views and the basics of positive psychology.
Discuss the role of biological processes in personality development and expression.
Explain how an eclectic blend of several major personality theories can be applied to common life situations and experiences.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 202  Theories of Counseling  

This course is a one-semester introduction to the basic theoretical approaches used in counseling. This course is designed to give students an overview of the different psychological theories used by counselors, therapists and human service professionals. A goal of the course is to allow students with an interest in human services to better understand the options open to both counselors and clients when engaging in the therapeutic process. While the curriculum will not make counselors of the students who complete this course, it will provide a foundation of knowledge about the major theories.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe relevant counseling theories.
Understand various ethical issues in the practice of counseling.
Describe the terminology associated with various theories.
Identify the major contributors associated with various theories.
Explain the assumptions of each theory.
Identify the goals of each theory.
Identify the roles of the therapist and the client within each theory.
Explain the process of therapy for each theory.
Identify the various techniques associated with each theory.
Evaluate the strengths and limitations of each theory.
Describe the characteristics of a multiculturally competent counselor.

Prerequisites: PSY 140 and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 203  Counseling Skills  

This experiential course is a one-semester introduction to the basic skills used in the helping process. The course is designed for individuals pursuing a career in social work, or other related human service fields of study. The focus is on development, synthesis, analysis and demonstration of critical reasoning in the use of the core skills that facilitate effective and culturally responsive helping relationships. This course includes both didactic instruction and the development of basic techniques through frequent, applied counseling skills lab activities and written self reflection assignments.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the knowledge, values and skills of the Social Work or Psychology or Counseling profession at the introductory level and analyze the decisions made for use of certain counseling skills in practice lab activities.
Demonstrate the effective use of basic counseling skills for introductory practice.
Assess self-awareness by personal reflection and self-correction in periodic written personal evaluations showing the development of a professional identity and cultural competency.
Analyze and synthesize multiple sources of knowledge, including: prevention, intervention, theory, cultural competency and evaluation in the applied lab activities.
Demonstrate, in alignment with the NASW or APA or ACA Standards for Cultural Competency, the introductory level knowledge, values and counseling skills necessary to work from a strengths perspective with diverse populations.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (PSY 140 or SWO 101) and ENG 100.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 204  Addiction, Drugs, and the Brain  

In order to develop a greater knowledge of the nature and complexity of addiction, the course provides an introduction to basic principles of psychopharmacology, including the neurochemistry of drug action, chemical signaling in the nervous system, and the anatomy of several neurotransmitter systems, as well as the behavioral assessment of drug effects. Students will develop an understanding of the addiction process utilizing a biopsychosocial perspective that involves knowing about the neurobiological, behavioral and social factors that influence drug use and abuse. Topics examined may include, but are not limited to, addictions to substances as well as other addictive behaviors, various psychopharmacological principles and research techniques, the mechanism of action of several drugs of abuse, and pharmacological treatments for psychological disorders such as Substance Use Disorder and psychotic, mood, and anxiety disorders. Prevention and treatment options will be discussed.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological perspectives of addiction.
Explain the physiology and neural mechanisms of the addiction process.
Identify and describe the mechanism of action of major substances and behaviors of abuse.
Examine basic concepts in pharmacology and various psychopharmacological principles and research techniques.
Explain the pharmacological treatments for psychological disorders including, but not limited to, Substance Use Disorder and psychotic, mood, and anxiety disorders.
Identify programs that provide prevention services as well as those which provide rehabilitation programs and support services.
Identify populations where addiction is highly prevalent and explain the psychological and sociological factors that may be contributing to this phenomenon.

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or BIO 110 or BIO 150.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 205  Human Sexuality  

Utilizing a biopsychosocial model, this course seeks to foster healthy attitudes toward sexuality by providing knowledge and having discussions about the formation of sexual beliefs and myths, the anatomy and physiology of human sexual systems, the psychological and social aspects of sex and gender roles, love and sexuality, sexual minorities, and the legal aspects of sexuality. (Note: material of a sensitive nature will be discussed in this course).

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and explain the nature of human sexuality as a scientific discipline.
Describe and analyze major theoretical perspectives of human sexuality from biological, behavioral, social, political, and historical perspectives.
Identify and explain different research methods used to examine human sexuality and variations in sexual behavior.
Discuss psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to issues addressing human sexuality, gender, and sexual orientation.
Understand historical and contemporary issues surrounding sexuality in our society.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role of emotions in sexual expression.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 210  Lifespan Human Development  

This course investigates how and why people of diverse backgrounds change over time. It surveys theories, research and controversies of human development from conception to death. It analyzes the physical, cognitive and psycho-social development in ecological contexts from multidisciplinary perspectives. Emphasis is on how to promote well-being and growth, and to overcome developmental challenges throughout life span.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic universal principles underlying human development.
Describe the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of lifespan development.
Explain major theories and methodologies related to lifespan human development.
Describe and analyze major changes across different stages throughout lifespan (prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, aging, and death and dying).
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of lifespan human development in today's global context.
Describe and discuss major crises, disabilities, undesirable developmental outcomes and the historical social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination) on developmental differences.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth for optimal personal development in today's complex society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 215  Industrial Psychology  

The study of organizations and groups from a psychological perspective. The course covers fundamentals of organizational behavior, motivation and reward systems, leadership and organizational change, rumor, resistance to change, management styles and stress as it applies to the workplace. It is designed to meet the special needs of business administration students, as well as business management and psychology majors. It will also prove of great value to anyone contemplating any supervisory or management position, such as in nursing, education, social work and construction technology.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define organizational behavior, list the key elements and understand why it is important to understand the psychological principles affecting the workplace.
Understand and explain a motivational theory that pertains to industrial and organizational psychology.
Understand the nature of organizational communications, including the factors that influence decision making.
Understand the nature of leadership and be able to list at least three leadership skills.
Explain "social environment" conformity.
Understand the power of rumor and how it might be controlled.
Explain the concept of industrial participation by employees including: (1) process, (2) prerequisites, (3) benefits, (4) types, and (5) limitations.
Be familiar with the social problems and ethical issues that cause stress and distress in the workplace.
Know the various responsibilities incumbent upon worker and employer regarding referral and treatment of social problems in industry.
Understand the nature of "change" in the workplace.

Prerequisites: ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075) and PSY 140. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 220  Abnormal Psychology  

The nature of abnormal behavior, its etiology and classification together with a brief examination of treatment methods are emphasized. Psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic-existential, and socio-cultural perspectives will be considered.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe and compare ambiguities inherent in the psychological and cultural definitions of abnormality.
Identify and describe major historical and current theoretical perspectives regarding the causation of abnormal behavior and explain how each is regarded in society.
Identify and describe the major mental disorders and summarize the diagnostic criteria for each.
Define and give examples of key terms and research methods used in studying abnormal psychology.
Identify and describe the titles, training, and responsibilities of professionals working in the field of mental health.
List and describe the major treatment methods of mental disorders.
Identify major legal and ethical challenges in which law and abnormal psychology intersect.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 221  Social Psychology  

This course examines theories and research in the study of the social influences on individual behavior. It explores the various ways people think about and relate to one another. Topics include self-concept, persuasion, conformity, and aggression. Emphasis is placed on diversity, social justice issues, and different perspectives on the interaction of person and context.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply psychological theory and research to social issues and problems.
Describe aspects of the self as they relate to social and cultural influences.
Assess the significance of attitudes on perception, moral judgment, prejudice and prosocial behavior.
Depict the impact of violence and aggression on the individual, the group and society.
Cite the ways in which social factors can dictate individual behavior.
Analyze the ways humans relate to one another, including prejudice and discrimination.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 225  Experiences in Diversity  

This course critically examines systems of stratification within the United States. Topics include: race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender and sexual orientation. Study is concentrated on understanding the legal and policy based frameworks which created and perpetuate group-based inequality for various people in the U.S.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the etiology of racist, homophobic, ethnocentric, and sexist ideologies.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation.
Describe the impact of minority and majority status as it pertains to economic, psychological and social experience.
List contradictions between the idea that we all have certain inalienable rights and the reality that certain groups in our society continue to be denied many of those rights.
List contributions of those outside of the "mainstream" and understand how those marginalized "others" started social movements which challenged the US to become more democratic, and inclusive.
Describe the systematic ways that inequality due to race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation are perpetuated and possibly eradicated by society’s social institutions.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: PSY 140 or SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 235  Educational Psychology  

This course introduces students to theories, research, and applied topics related to teaching and learning. It studies developmentally appropriate education with learner diversity and multicultural influences. Emphasis is on how to effectively motivate learners through appropriate teaching design, class management and assessment, and how to connect theory to teaching and learning practices in today’s global contexts.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and evaluate major theories and approaches related to cognitive development, teaching and learning.
Analyze and evaluate learners’ physical, cognitive and social-emotional characteristics of development.
Describe and analyze teacher’s role in motivating learners.
Identify and discuss effective instructional design, class management, assessment, and other teaching/learning practices in today’s global contexts.
Identify and analyze social/cultural influences (including discrimination and inequality) on learner distress, and accommodations for students from diverse (such as special needs, poverty, multicultural, multilingual and other) backgrounds.
Apply effective principles to promote self-understanding and personal/career development.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 241  Child Development  

This course examines physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in ecological contexts from conception to adolescence. It surveys various theories and research of child development, and examines social/cultural influences that may shape or compromise normal development and transitions in today's global contexts. Emphasis is on how to promote healthy growth and overcome developmental challenges during this life stage.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the basic principles underlying child development.
Describe and analyze the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of development from prenatal to adolescence.
Describe and explain major theories and research methods of child development.
Identify and evaluate major changes at different stages (prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle and late childhood, adolescence).
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of child development in today's global context.
Describe and analyze social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination) on normal and atypical childhood development and transitions.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth, to promote optimal personal/career development for both individual and family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 242  Adolescent Psychology  

This course examines physical, cognitive and psychosocial development in ecological contexts from puberty to maturity. It surveys various theories and research of adolescent development. It examines social/cultural influences that may shape/compromise development and transitions in today's global contexts. Emphasis is on how to promote healthy growth and overcome developmental challenges during adolescence.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify and explain the basic principles underlying adolescent development.
Describe and analyze the physical, cognitive and psychosocial characteristics of development from puberty to maturity.
Describe and explain major theories and research methods of adolescent development.
Identify and discuss the multi-disciplinary and multi-contextual characteristics of adolescent development in today's global context.
Describe and analyze social/cultural influences (including inequality, discrimination, etc) on adolescent development and transitions.
Identify and apply strategies for well-being and growth, to promote optimal personal/career development for both individual and family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 255  Intro to Biological Psychology  

Biological psychology (sometimes called physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience) is the study of how different systems in the body, primarily the nervous system, coordinate to produce experience and behavior. This course is designed to be an introduction to this interdisciplinary field of study. Topics range from the cellular basis of neuronal activities, the physiological bases of motor control, sensory systems, motivated behaviors, and higher mental processes and disorders. This course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior, ranging from animal behavior to clinical disorders. Successful completion of this course will provide a strong foundation of basic knowledge and methodological competencies in Biological Psychology/Neuroscience required of Psychology majors at 4-year institutions.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the structure and function of the nervous system, neuroanatomy, and the divisions of the nervous system.
Analyze the structure and function of neurons, the electrical and chemical communication between neurons, and the major neurotransmitters.
Describe and evaluate the biological and physiological basis of psychological experience and behavior (including sensory and motor experience, motivation, learning and memory, consciousness, reproductive behaviors, psychological disorders and addiction).
Understand developmental changes in the brain and nervous system across the lifespan.
Evaluate the psychological and behavioral consequences of damage to the physiological systems.
Interpret and communicate research findings within the field of biological psychology.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

PSY 290  Adulthood and Aging  

This course is an examination of the biological, physical, psychological, cognitive, affective, social and cultural changes that occur as people move from adulthood into old age. It explores the controversies, myths, and realities of growing older in America. As well, the course emphasizes the similarities and differences of adulthood and aging across cultures.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the basic principles underlying development from the adult years through the end of life.
Identify the major physical and biological changes in adult development from adulthood to old age.
Describe the various cognitive changes in adult development, such as those related to memory, intelligence, thinking, and problem solving.
Evaluate the various theoretical explanations of cognitive, affective, socio-cultural and personality development in adult development through old age.
Evaluate the relevance of cross-cultural research findings in adult development and aging.
Examine multiple perspectives on death and dying, considering the individual, family, and culture.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC - Sociology

SOC 100  Human Relations  

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic principles of sociology with emphasis on human relationships in community and industrial settings.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain the importance of human relations in the community and occupational spheres.
Interact effectively in the social context.
Describe the significance of self-awareness in building good human relationships.
Distinguish between the formal and informal structures of an organization as they relate to appropriate human relations.
Describe appropriate employee on-the-job behavior, especially during the first few probationary months.
Describe how the impact of human relations in the leadership and motivational areas can affect productivity.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 110  Introduction to Sociology  

This course studies the factors that determine social organization, social injustice, behavior and change as they are considered in relation to the individual student's own life and society. Study is concentrated on social intervention, culture, social class, national and global inequality, institutions and socialization.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the sociological perspective to their own lives.
Further personal development through knowledge and in the socialization process.
Describe the impact of the five major social institutions on society and themselves.
Assess present and possible future effects of social change on their culture's and values.
Depict the effects of living in a modern complex society.
Use the three major sociological theoretical perspectives to analyze a major concept within sociology.
Describe the systematic ways that oppression and privilege are built into and perpetuated by social institutions.
Describe the various ways in which global interdependence impacts the social, economic and political society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 120  Social Problems  

This course studies contemporary social problems from theoretical and practical perspectives. Theoretical assessments of the national and international origins and etiology that support and sustain social injustice, inequality, and conflict will be supported through data sources.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the sociological perspective to the national and international social problems.
Describe the origin, development, and society's possible treatment of at least two contemporary and social problems detailing how the rules of society and its social institutions attempt to sustain, perpetuate and/or eradicate inequity and injustice.
Describe the systematic ways that oppression is facilitated by powerful people and society's social institutions.
Describe the various ways in which global interdependence impacts the people in society.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099* or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted. *Courses marked with a star may be taken concurrently.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 131  Sport, Culture and Society  

Sports are cultural phenomena encompassing many facets of social life. Sports, Culture, and Society is designed to analyze society’s engagement in competitive sports as spectators. The course will explore the role of sports in society and the various types of social responses to the culture of sports. Topics that will be analyzed include media and sports, social inequality and sports, youth and sports, education and sports, gender and sports, politics and sports, violence in sports, and ethics in sports. The course will focus upon current events in the American culture that influence how people in society respond to sports.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Understand how and why sports have been created and organized in particular ways.
Articulate the ways that social, political and economic factors influence the growth, popularity and visibility of sports in society.
Describe the role sports play in school activities for youth.
List ways in which the media depict sports relative to gender.
Describe the positive and negative outcomes of participation in sports on group engagement and social growth.
Describe the manners in which sports motivate aggressive and violent behavior in society.
Understand the social processes that occur in connection with sports (competition, conflict, socialization, group cooperation).
Evaluate how sports have an impact on people's thoughts about their bodies and about gender, race/ethnicity, social class and disability.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 180  Marriage and The Family  

This course explores various types of family relationships in society and how sustaining and changing the values, beliefs and rules in relationships are supported and altered through society's institutions in diverse societies.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the American family in terms of the three major sociological theories.
Explain the concepts concerning who marries whom.
Describe how the rules in institutions shape perceptions of what constitutes a family and may reinforce inequality and discrimination.
Explain human reproduction, including prenatal aspects, childbirth, contraceptive techniques and socially transmitted diseases.
Assess possible future changes in what family forms, marriage forms and living arrangements are as they may affect the American family.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 210  Cultural Anthropology  

The societal and individualistic characteristics of culture are explored by examining and comparing several cultures. The evolution of community living from hunting and gathering societies to contemporary urban and suburban and there effects of individual behavior are explored.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply the cultural anthropological perspective to his/her own life.
Demonstrate usage of the fundamental principles involved in the study of culture to daily living.
Explain various types of "world views" as found in different cultures.
Describe the impact of the cultural environment upon the student's personality.
Assess the effects of cultural change upon the student's own and his/her culture's fundamental values.
Describe the systematic ways that social institutions may inhibit cultural change and reinforce inequality.
Describe global interdependence from a "world view" and how it impacts various cultures and societies.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ), Global Understanding (GU)

Prerequisites: SOC 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 215  Experiences in Diversity  

This course critically examines systems of stratification within the United States. Topics include: race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender and sexual orientation. Study is concentrated on understanding the legal and policy based frameworks which created and perpetuate group-based inequality for various people in the U.S.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Depict the etiology of racist, homophobic, ethnocentric, and sexist ideologies.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race and racism, ethnicity, sex and gender, and sexual orientation.
Describe the impact of minority and majority status as it pertains to economic, psychological and social experience.
List contradictions between the idea that we all have certain inalienable rights and the reality that certain groups in our society continue to be denied many of those rights.
List contributions of those outside of the "mainstream" and understand how those marginalized "others" started social movements which challenged the US to become more democratic, and inclusive.
Describe the systematic ways that inequality due to race, socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, religion, gender, and sexual orientation are perpetuated and possibly eradicated by society's social institutions.

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 219  The Sociology of Race And Immigration  

In this class we will scrutinize the Eurocentric construction of race, delving into how it was used as a central organizing principle in North American society. We will also explore racism as an ideology, and how it was and is used to create, promote and perpetuate racial inequality. In focusing on racism, we will discuss social policies which promote (d) and protect(ed) white wealth, while at the same time denying people of color access to opportunity and resources. In this context we will discuss white privilege, color-blindness, and affirmative action policies. In addition, we will research the immigration debate. In order to do this, we will work on defining the catch-all term “diversity, and then examine (1) immigration to the USA, paying close attention to the manner in which various group experiences were (and are) similar to, and different from, one another; (2) theories of integration; and (3) the multiculturalism debate. Furthermore, we will examine the “other” from the viewpoint of those marginalized in society. Therefore, we will explore the relationship between the dominant - hegemonic - culture, and sub-cultural beliefs, attitudes, challenges, and attempts to redefine group status. This means we will focus upon power relationships and the dynamics of group attempts to access power, and how social movements have shaped and transformed U.S. social fabric. This class will be both historical in nature and present-day oriented. We will take the time to study the past because without such knowledge we can neither understand nor examine the current system of racial domination. Such inquiry will help shed light on how historical circumstances continue to impact and shape current racialized identities and disparities. A field trip may be required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the social construction of racial and ethnic categories.
Demonstrate critical thinking on issues of race, ethnicity, racism and racial stratification.
List the racial contradictions inherent in US society, and different strategies toward resolving them.
Describe various immigrant experiences in the US using macro theories of integration.
Analyze public policies and laws which shape group identity and social movements.
Present ideas clearly in a formal and professional manner.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Diversity and Social Justice (DJ)

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 215 or PSY 225.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 220  Social Psychology  

This course examines theories and research in the study of the social influences on individual behavior. It explores the various ways people think about and relate to one another. Topics include self-concept, persuasion, conformity, and aggression. Emphasis is placed on diversity, social justice issues, and different perspectives on the interaction of person and context.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Apply psychological theory and research to social issues and problems.
Describe aspects of the self as they relate to social and cultural influences.
Assess the significance of attitudes on perception, moral judgment, prejudice and prosocial behavior.
Depict the impact of violence and aggression on the individual, the group and society.
Cite the ways in which social factors can dictate individual behavior.
Analyze the ways humans relate to one another, including prejudice and discrimination.

Prerequisites: SOC 110 or PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 240  Human Geography  

This class will look at how places and regions are interconnected, how they are unique, and how people, ideas, and things moving from one locale to another can change a place or region. After taking this class, students will view their surroundings in new ways by asking questions like: Why are peoples, cultures, and places what they are? Why are they where they are? How can geography help me understand today's changing world?

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define and describe the role of geography as an academic discipline its relation to other subjects, and career possibilities.
Explain the major course themes of globalization and cultural diversity, and how they relate to the various course topics.
Describe the major concepts and principles concerning our human relationship to, and use of, the earth's environment from an historical perspective.
Describe the major aspects of population growth and migration (both internal and international) and list the consequences of continued growth.
Describe the major geographical themes as applied to aspects of human culture such as language, music, religion, and social customs.
Describe the major world agricultural systems.
Describe the primary geographical aspects of economic development, the ways in which it varies, and the ways that countries can promote development.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SOC 260  Research Methodology  

This course investigates and analyzes both quantitative and qualitative research methodology. It is designed to give students the skills to examine social science issues through creating and utilizing empirical research. Study is concentrated on experimentation, types of research sources, survey construction and field participation. Research papers are required.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the scientific method and its assumptions as a way of knowing and why it is used in research.
Explain the relationship between theory and research.
Apply the steps in the research design and distinguish between correlational designs.
Describe and distinguish the difference between independent and dependent variables and techniques of experimental control.
Create a literature review on a relevant social science topic.
Detail the process of creating a hypothesis and question for examination through research.
Describe index and scales construction.
Explain the differences between quantitative and qualitative research including correlation, association and causation.
Describe the meaning of validity and reliability in research while demonstrating an understanding of construct, internal and external validity and the threats to validity.
Explain the importance of the IRB and ethics in research.
Explain the difference between random and systematic error.
Apply methods to measure causal and/or associative changes in a dependent variable.
Describe the difference between primary and secondary data.
Describe the experimental and quasi-experimental design.
Explain single IV, factorial and single case designs.
Conduct mock interview and debriefing.
Describe the purpose of a research proposal and write a sample proposal in APA research format.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Literacy (IL)

Prerequisites: (MAT 050 or MAT 060 or MAT 100 or MAT 110 or MAT 111 or MAT 120 or MAT 121 or MAT 125 or MAT 126 or MAT 128 or MAT 135 or MAT 136 or MAT 140 or MAT 141 or MAT 150 or MAT 151 or MAT 152 or MAT 160 or MAT 161 or MAT 200 or MAT 210 or MAT 230 or MAT 260 or MAT 261) and ENG 100 and (SOC 100 or SOC 110 or SOC 120 or SOC 131 or SOC 180 or SOC 210 or SOC 215 or SOC 219 or SOC 220 or SOC 240 or PSY 130 or PSY 140 or PSY 200 or PSY 202 or PSY 203 or PSY 204 or PSY 205 or PSY 210 or PSY 215 or PSY 220 or PSY 221 or PSY 225 or PSY 235 or PSY 241 or PSY 242 or PSY 290).

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

TSC Trauma Studies

TSC 230  Recognizing Trauma  

This course provides students with a foundation in understanding trauma. Multiple cross-cultural definitions of trauma will be considered. The course explores the causes of trauma, including but not limited to domestic and community violence, mass shootings, school shootings, war, sexual assault and harassment, child sexual abuse, physical abuse, neglect, accidents, natural disasters, suicide, and other traumatic loss. Students will understand the symptoms related to traumatic reactions, across physical, neurobiological, cognitive, behavioral, emotional, social, and developmental domains. Techniques for hypothetically assessing trauma will be explored. NOTE: Pre-Requisite: In addition to PSY 140, students must have completed at least one Trauma Studies program elective.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Define trauma through various cross-cultural perspectives.
Identify primary causes of trauma.
Recognize the symptoms associated with traumatic reactions.
Examine rates of different types of trauma and identify reliable sources for current data.
Develop a hypothetical plan for trauma assessment.
Demonstrate proficiency in accessing, interpreting, and communicating findings from trauma-related research.

Prerequisites: PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

TSC 236  Trauma Outcomes and Societal Response  

This course provides students with an understanding of traumatic reactions to prepare professionals to respond to those suffering after a traumatic event compassionately and effectively, across clinical and non-clinical settings, so that interventions support prevention, resilience, and treatment. Common trauma outcomes will be discussed. Clinically, diagnosis and treatment options will be reviewed with an emphasis on crisis intervention and evidence-based treatments. Non-clinically, trauma-sensitive considerations and interventions will be discussed systemically, across families, communities, and the workplace. Legal and ethical issues surrounding trauma will be reviewed. The course will highlight protective and risk factors that increase/decrease traumatic reactions and review the experiences of posttraumatic growth and resiliency in the face of trauma. Students will understand the potential of shock, desensitization, burnout, vicarious trauma, and compassion fatigue among professionals and will be able to recognize the importance of professionals’ self-care.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize common trauma outcomes.
Identify clinical diagnostic options and evidence-based clinical prevention and intervention strategies.
Non-clinically, recognize trauma-sensitive considerations across systems and related legal and ethical issues.
Highlight protective and risk factors for trauma.
Relate traumatic reactions to posttraumatic growth and resiliency.
Recognize vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue and the importance of helpers’ self-care.

Prerequisites: TSC 230.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SPA - Spanish

SPA 150  Spanish for Business & Law  

Spanish for Business and Law is a course designed to provide students with common Spanish business and legal terminology used when doing business and practicing law in the United States and globally. In addition, students will be taught how to effectively communicate business and law concepts in Spanish.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Students will use verbal and written communication to have basic, meaningful, and accurate conversations in the course of doing business and practicing law in the United States and globally.
Utilize vocabulary with a basic ability to understand and communicate business and legal concepts in the course of doing business and practicing law in the United States and globally.
Students will be able to self-assess one’s own biases and cultural competence to communicate effectively with Spanish speaking populations in the course of doing business and practicing law.
Students will identify cultural characteristics in Latinx cultures living in the United States.
Students will self-assess and adjust their communication style to build relationships with persons of Latinx cultures using language that promotes trust.

Prerequisites: SPA 101 and ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours