Academic Catalog

Education and Child Development

The College Transfer Office is set up to help Delaware County Community College students transfer to four-year colleges and universities. If you are planning to transfer, you are strongly encouraged to meet with a transfer advisor within your first two semesters (or before you reach 30 transferable college credits from all institutions attended).

Student working in Early Childhood Lab

Associate in Arts (AA) Degrees

Early Childhood Education (ECED)

The Early Childhood Education program of study prepares students to work with young children in a variety of early care and education settings. Graduates will be able to provide high quality educational environments that are inclusive of all children ages birth to 9. They will gain the necessary knowledge and skills to provide a developmentally appropriate, culturally responsive and inclusive early learning experience.

At the completion of this degree, students are prepared to enter the early care and education workforce. Opportunities include working in childcare, young school age childcare, nursery schools and as teacher’s aides in public schools.

This program of study also serves as a transfer pathway to earn teacher certification, Pre-kindergarten through 4th grade. Students wishing to earn teacher certification must transfer to a 4 year institution to earn a Bachelor’s degree, Prekindergarten through 4th grade.

Education (EDUC)

The Education curriculum was developed to meet the needs of current and prospective students interested in transferring to a four-year institution for the purpose of receiving a PA Public School Teacher’s Certification. This degree is designed to transfer to middle grades, secondary education, special education, or other four year certification degree programs. Among colleges and universities there are variances within the first two years at some schools contingent upon the area of PA Public School Certification pursued. Additionally, each of these areas of certification involves different course selections. All of these conditions necessitate working closely with a transfer counselor in the Career and Counseling Center to ensure a seamless transfer process to a four-year institution.

Certificates are short-term educational programs focused on specific work force skills and/or preparation for continued academic study. Delaware County Community College offers a Certificate of Competency and a Certificate of Proficiency.

Child Development Associate, Certificate of Competency (ECA)

The Child Development Associate Certificate of Competency (ECA) is intended for students who wish to earn the national Child Development Associate Credential (CDA) from the Council for Professional Recognition. Earning the national credential will prepare the student for entry-level positions in early care and education programs. The ECA certificate meets the required professional development for earning the CDA and prepares the student to complete their Professional Portfolio and Resource file. There are optional internships available to assist the student in acquiring the 480 hours of professional experience required to earn the CDA. There are additional requirements for assessment that are outside the scope of this certificate. See the Council for Professional Recognition website for more information on earning the CDA, www.cdacouncil.org.

The ECA Certificate seamlessly articulates into the Associate of Art in Early Childhood Education program of study.

 Early Childhood Director, Certificate (ECD)

The Early Childhood Director Certificate of Competency from Delaware County Community College will prepare students for administrative and leadership positions in early care and education programs. Coursework will cover strategies for program administration, understanding of financial management and current issues facing early care and education programs. This certificate of competency also meets the educational requirements for Pennsylvania’s Director Credential that is awarded by the Pennsylvania Early Learning Keys to Quality. Students seeking this certificate must have an AAS or AS in ECE or related field or higher or have completed 45 hours towards an AAS degree in Early Childhood Education.

 Early Childhood Education Professional Core, Certificate (ECP)

This certificate of proficiency is intended for the early childhood educator currently working in early learning programs who hold an Associate or Bachelor degree unrelated to early childhood education and needs to meet state requirements for Child Care Licensing, Keystone STARS, Pre K-Counts and PreK-4th grade teacher certification. Students will engage in coursework specific to early childhood education with the goal of increasing teacher competence. Coursework can also be applied to the Associate of Art in Early Childhood Education (ECED) if the student chooses to complete the general education requirements.

Completion of the certificate allows the student to be assistants and lead teachers in early learning centers, assistant teachers in K-4th grade settings, certified teachers preparing to test into Prek-4th grade teacher certification and those seeking a PDE Private Academic Schools certificate. This certificate meets the required 30 credits in Early Childhood Education per the Pennsylvania Career Lattice in Early Childhood Education.

Spanish for the Professions 1, Certificate (SPA1)

This certificate is designed for learners interested in acquiring basic Spanish language skills that will prepare them to communicate in basic Spanish professionally and as supplementary preparation for many professional fields, such as paralegal, early childhood education, and business.  

Spanish for the Professions 2, Certificate (SPA2)

This certificate is designed for learners interested in acquiring intermediate Spanish Language skills that will prepare them to communicate at an intermediate level in professional Spanish and as supplementary preparation for many professional fields, such as paralegal, early childhood education, and business.

View full A-Z Course List

ECE - Early Childhood Education

ECE 100  Principles of Early Childhood Education  

This course examines the historical and philosophical background of early childhood education as well as the regulations that govern early childhood education in both the public and private sector. The impacts of social, economic and culture diversity on early learning will be explored as well as professional ethics and working effectively with parents. Students will also be able to explore career goals and develop a career plan.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the historical and philosophical basis of early childhood education.
Describe the variety of settings that offer early childhood education.
Identify the key stakeholders and their role in governance of early childhood education in both the public and private sector.
Identify the key theories that influence teaching practice.
Describe the relationship between teaching, learning and assessment in Early Childhood programs.
Develop skills necessary to conduct ongoing objective observations for the purpose of child assessment, program planning and curriculum.
Identify the role of culture and diversity in delivery of early childhood programs.
Develop a professional development plan to meet career goals.
Develop a positive climate for learning that involves the establishment and maintenance of partnerships with families.
Use the NAEYC code of ethics to make decisions about professional practice.
Write an educational philosophy that outlines current values and beliefs (key portfolio assessment).

Corequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 110  Infant/Toddler Care and Education  

This course will prepare the student to use a relationship-based model to develop and implement an active learning environment for infants and toddlers. Students will implement individualized curriculum that supports the infant/toddler's social, emotional, cognitive and physical development needs. (5 field observation hours are required).

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Implement a relationship-based model of care giving and teaching.
Implement multiple approaches to learning and teaching.
Effectively apply the principles of developmentally appropriate practice, constructivism, socio-cultural theory, activity theory and play in developing active learning experiences.
Utilize Pennsylvania¿s early childhood learning standards in developing learning experiences.
Implement lessons based on children¿s stages of cognitive development, use of senses for exploration and understanding of the world, and development of age appropriate problem solving and critical thinking skills.
Design classrooms that demonstrates appropriate use of indoor and outdoor space.
Design classrooms that are inclusive for diverse learners including differences in age, development, culture and linguistics.
Select, provide and evaluate materials and create new materials consistent with learning standards.
Explain the connection between materials, learning standards and instruction.
Utilize child observation to make program and curriculum decisions.

Prerequisites: ECE 130.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 111  Methods and Materials for Teaching  

This course will prepare the student to develop and implement an active learning environment for children in Pre-k to 4th grade that incorporates classroom design, learning activities that support physical, cognitive, social and emotional development and inquiry based teaching strategies. Classroom design, play, and teacher/child interactions will be integral topics in this course. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC) when taken with ECE 112, ECE 121, ECE 130, ECE 140 and ECE 201

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Effectively apply the principles of developmentally appropriate practice, constructivism, socio-cultural theory, activity theory and play in developing active learning experiences.
Implement multiple approaches to learning and teaching.
Utilize supportive practices in teacher/child interactionsDesign classrooms that demonstrate appropriate use of indoor and outdoor space.
Design classrooms that are inclusive for diverse learners including differences in age, development, culture and linguistics.
Develop and implement effective classroom management strategies.
Utilize Pennsylvania’s early childhood learning standards in developing learning experienceSelect, provide and evaluate materials and create new materials consistent with learning standards.
Explain the connection between materials, learning standards and instruction.
Differentiate teaching strategies to promote positive outcomes for each child, including the use of assistive technology for children with disabilities.
Evaluate and analyze developmentally appropriate use of technology with young children including electronic picturebooks, applications and software.
Integrate curriculum and assessment to create a learning project for preschool age children that applies developmentally appropriate teaching strategies including lesson planning, room design, differentiation and technology.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: ECE 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 112  Developing a Professional Portfolio and Resource File for ECE  

This course will prepare the student to be able to develop a professional portfolio that will demonstrate their competency in teaching in the field of Early Childhood Education. Students will gain knowledge of how to create and maintain their portfolio and how to use it in their careers. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC) when taken with ECE 111, ECE 121, ECE 130, ECE 140 and ECE 201

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the purpose and use of a professional portfolio.
Identify the key components of a professional portfolio.
Evaluate key stakeholder requirements for demonstrating competence in the professional portfolio.
Create and format an electronic portfolio using free or low cost software.
Utilize digital technologies to store, retrieve, manipulate and transmit data.
Identify and compile online early childhood education resources for future use.
Self assess to identify prior learning and plan for future learning.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: ENG 050 or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

1 Credit

ECE 120  Early Childhood Education Laboratory I  

These courses provide the student an opportunity to function as a member of an instructional team in an approved nursery school, child care center or Head Start program. The students activity is carefully supervised by a qualified in-service classroom teacher and the Colleges supervisor of the field experience. The courses also include a weekly seminar discussion of issues rising from this laboratory experience. This course requires ninety hours of field experience. NOTE: Pre-reqs must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Use a variety of effective instructional strategies.
Integrate play based, project based and experience based teaching as an integral part of childrens development.
Implement lessons based on childrens developmental needs.
Utilize observation and assessment to guide and support teaching and learning through differential instruction.
Exhibit a professional attitude toward assigned responsibilities.
Communicate effectively with children, and teachers.

Prerequisites: ECE 100 and ECE 110 and ECE 130.

4 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 6 Weekly Lab Hours

ECE 121  Early Childhood Education Laboratory II  

This is the capstone course for the Early Childhood Education program of study. In this course, the student will synthesize their learning by functioning as a member of an instructional team in an approved early care and education program (nursery school, childcare, preschool, Head Start). A qualified in-service classroom teacher and the College’s supervisor of the field experience carefully supervise the student’s activity. A weekly seminar discusses successes, challenges and issues arising from this laboratory experience . 90 hours in the field experience is required. NOTE: Background clearances including FBI, PA Child Abuse and PA Criminal clearances and a Pennsylvania approved child abuse recognition and reporting training is required prior to enrollment in this course. Documentation of a negative TB test is also required. NOTE: Pre-reqs must be completed with grade of 'C' or better. College Academic Learning Goals Designations: Information Technology (TC) when taken with ECE 111, ECE 112, ECE 130, ECE 140 and ECE 201

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Construct and implement lessons based on student’s stage of cognitive development using a multisensory approach that supports exploration and understanding of the world.
Create environments that are educationally focused, respectful, supportive and challenging for all children.
Construct and implement an integrated program that includes all content areas across the learning standards.
Use of methods that support children’s development in all domains and content areas.
Implement accommodations and modifications for diverse learners.
Use appropriate interactions between teachers and students and among students.
Construct and implement lesson and activity plans that set instructional goals and objectives guided by content, pedagogy, and developmental considerations that are consistent with Pennsylvania’s learning standards.
Document children’s learning for families through classroom displays.
Observe, document and assess children's learning through effective use of digital assessment tools.
Create and compile a digital professional portfolio that demonstrates competencies in the NAEYC Professional Preparation standards and effective use of technology.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Critical Reasoning (CR), Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: ECE 111.

4 Credits1 Weekly Lecture Hour
 6 Weekly Lab Hours

ECE 130  Early Childhood Development  

This course examines the cognitive, physical, social and emotional development of the young child from conception through the early childhood period. Students will integrate and apply the major concepts and theories of child development to the early childhood classroom. Students will also have the opportunity to observe the principles of child development by conducting field observations for each age group studied. ( 10 hours of outside field observations either in the home or school will be required. NOTE: Students will need to have federal and state background clearances for observing children in a school setting) This course is a prerequisite for the ECE courses that follow. To meet this prerequisite, the student must earn a C or better. A final grade of D or lower will require retaking this course. College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC) when taken with ECE 111, ECE 112, ECE 121, ECE 140 and ECE 201

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the multiple interacting influences on children’s development.
Identify universal and diverse child development principles.
Know and understand the characteristics and needs of young children.
Know and understand normative development for language, cognitive, physical, social and emotional development.
Apply knowledge of child development to the early childhood classroom.
Describe the developmental patterns of change, physical, cognitive and socioemotional in infancy and early childhood.
Observe children and record behavior in a variety of settings in order to understand variation and exceptionality in individuals.
Use observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches, including the use of technology in documentation, assessment and data collection.
Analyze the benefits and influence of technology use with very young children.
Apply their knowledge of child development by observing, recording and interpreting children's behavior for the purpose of program planning using appropriate technology tools for data collection.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 140  Integrated Curriculum and Assessment  

This course will prepare the student to develop an integrated curriculum for preschool, kindergarten and primary age children based on the structure of the academic content areas and the early learning standards. This course will also explore the relationship between curriculum and assessment in providing high quality learning experiences and differentiating instruction. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC) when taken with ECE 111, ECE 112, ECE 121, ECE 130, and ECE 201; Pre-reqs must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop effective and appropriate curriculum that creates a secure base from which young children can explore and tackle challenging problems.
Develop and implement meaningful, challenging curriculum that supports young children’s ability and motivation to solve problems and think well.
Develop curriculum that includes both planned and spontaneous experiences that are meaningful and challenging for all children that lead to positive learning outcomes and develop positive dispositions towards learning within each content area.
Evaluate the principal theories that influence current curriculum in early childhood education.
Detail the basic problem with implementation of an early childhood curriculum.
Develop curriculum that is culturally and linguistically responsive and addresses the needs of diverse learners.
Integrate observation and assessment in curriculum planning.
Research, analyze and synthesize information on Developmentally Appropriate Assessment and prepare a presentation using technology for key stakeholders.
Integrate curriculum across content areas.
Identify the goals, benefits, and uses of assessmentUtilize developmentally appropriate assessment strategies to promote positive outcomes for each child.
Use online assessment software to enter child assessment data and analyze this data to make curriculum decisions and differentiate instruction.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: ECE 130.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 190  ECE Internship (1 credit)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 60 hour internship will earn 1 college credit for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE: All students must have the following prior to starting the internship: All students will be required to have Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance, Pennsylvania Criminal Clearance, FBI clearance, documentation of current immunizations, TB screening, two character references, and Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting certificate. There are additional fees to obtaining clearances and students may have to get their clearances renewed. Pre-requisites - To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

1 Credit

ECE 194  ECE Internship (2 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 120 hour internship will earn 2 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE: All students must have the following prior to starting the internship: All students will be required to have Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance, Pennsylvania Criminal Clearance, FBI clearance, documentation of current immunizations, TB screening, two character references, and Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting certificate. There are additional fees to obtaining clearances and students may have to get their clearances renewed. Pre-requisites - To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

2 Credits

ECE 199  ECE Internship (3 credits)  

College-Sponsored Experiential Learning (CSEL) is designed to integrate on-the-job learning experiences with classroom studies. These experiences are structured either to explore career options or to prepare for a specific occupation. Students participating in the Cooperative Education and Internship Program gain college credit and are graded for their learning/work experience by the appropriate faculty. Students participating in this 180 hour internship will earn 3 college credits for this experience. Upon successful completion of this hands-on work experience, the student should be able to satisfy instructionally selected competencies from those below according to the number of credits to be awarded. NOTE: All students must have the following prior to starting the internship: All students will be required to have Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance, Pennsylvania Criminal Clearance, FBI clearance, documentation of current immunizations, TB screening, two character references, and Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting certificate. There are additional fees to obtaining clearances and students may have to get their clearances renewed. Pre-requisites - To be eligible for an internship, students must: Have completed a minimum of 18 or more credits within the last 5 years. Have begun course work in their major (at least 9 credits). Have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.5. Obtain a written recommendation by a DCCC faculty within the discipline of the internship. Submit a current resume to the Office of Student Employment Services.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Explain three program-related concepts that have been applied during the work experience.
Describe the ways that technology is utilized in the work experience.
Analyze the culture of the host organization.
Analyze an operational process within the work experience.
Demonstrate how assigned tasks depend on successful communication.
Describe how time and activity are managed to meet work-imposed deadlines.
Describe an instance where problem-solving skills were needed to analyze a situation in the work experience.
Demonstrate specifically how job-related competence has improved.
Formulate a self-assessment for career growth and personal satisfaction.
Satisfy the competencies of the chosen CSEL placement (to be developed in consultation with the CSEL instructor).
Work closely with a faculty mentor in the student's program/major to complete a project which articulates how the experience helps the student achieve program outcomes

3 Credits

ECE 201  Children Families and Community  

This course will prepare the student to implement an educational environment that builds a community of learners whose members are children, families, community members and teachers. Building relationships is integrated into practical strategies for partnering with families and communities to facilitate children’s learning. NOTE: College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC) when taken with ECE 111, ECE 112, ECE 121, ECE 130 and ECE 140; Pre-reqs must be completed with grade of 'C' or better.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Implement a positive climate for learning that involves partnering with diverse families and communities.
Identify the role of culture on children’s development and learning.
Articulate the potential impact of differences in cultural practices between home and school.
Maintain respectful, ongoing, meaningful communication with family members that sustain partnerships with families.
Provide meaningful opportunities for families to be involved in their child’s education.
Develop strategies for keeping families informed of children’s progress.
Communicate effectively with other early childhood professionals.
Identify community resources and utilize those resources in program planning.
Advocate for children and families in the larger social and political arena.
Use of technology for communication with families that is ethical and effective.
Reflect on how theory, culture, values, ethics, communication and experience influence home, school and community partnerships.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: ECE 130 and EDU 220.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 290  Administration and Supervision of Early Care and Education Environments  

This course will examine the varied aspects of administration and supervision in the early care and education environment. It is designed for early childhood educators who are or would like to take on an administrative role in an early childhood program. All administrative aspects of the early care and education program will be explored with particular emphasis on the development of interpersonal relationships and skills needed for effective program management. NOTE: Prerequisites: AAS or AS in ECE or related field OR completed 45 hours towards an AAS degree

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify the varied roles of the early care and education director.
Utilize licensing and certification requirements in decision making.
Evaluate strategies for staff recruitment, supervision and retention.
Analyze enrollment practices and policies.
Implement effective strategies for working with families.
Identify personal leadership styles and role in program administration.
Design the physical environment to meet needs of children and staff.
Evaluate communication between parents, staff and administration.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 291  Current Issues and Trends in Early Care and Education  

This course will examine the current issues and trends in early childhood education. Through the use of discussions, debates and disagreement, current issues will be identified and a generation of solutions will be formulated. The design of this course is such that the early childhood educator will become a reflective decision maker. NOTE Prerequisites: AAS or AS in ECE or related field OR completed 45 hours towards an AAS degree.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Identify factors that lead to effective leadership.
Be able to evaluate role of government in early care and education.
Learn to advocate for young children.
Analyze the role of business in early care and education.
Develop strategies for promoting professional development.
Develop and maintaining standards of quality improvement.
Evaluate the quality of early care and education environments.
Analyze the role of families.
Identify supports for special needs children and families.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

ECE 293  Financial Strategies for the Business of Early Care and Education  

This course will examine financial and business management strategies associated with managing a childcare center. Topics covered will include marketing, budgeting, business plans, for profit versus nonprofit financial strategies; grant writing, enrollment, cost of care and staffing issues. This course is designed as an interactive, hands on approach to learning for the center director or the early childhood professional who would like to be a center director. NOTE Prerequisites: AAS or AS in ECE or related field OR completed 45 hours towards an AAS degree.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Basic principles of accounting and budgeting.
The advantages and disadvantages of for profit versus non-profit early care and education centers.
Business plans and marketing strategies.
Human resource management.
True cost of care.
City and state agencies that provide financial support to families and early care and education.
Basic principles of grant writing.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

EDU - Education

EDU 110  Introduction to Teaching  

This course provides students with an introduction to the field of teaching and learning. Students will become familiar with teaching as a career choice and state requirements for becoming a certified teacher. The foundations, history, and philosophy of education will be examined and students will gain an understanding of modern education in our society. Students will also examine the impact of current issues on American education today. To assist students in gaining knowledge in a well organized format, the course is structured into four areas of competence: historical and philosophical foundations; teachers and students; schools and curriculum; and finances, government, and legal concerns.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop background in education foundations, theory and policy, including understanding current issues with historical and philosophical background including inclusionary practices (PDE Competencies).
Develop background in education foundations, theory and policy, including understanding social, economic and cultural diversity, and implications for learning (PDE Competencies).
Develop background in education foundations, theory and policy, including general and professional ethics (PDE Competencies).
Demonstrate understanding of the way in which classroom environments influence children's learning including the connection between classroom materials, learning standards, and instruction (PDE Competencies).
List the advantages and disadvantages of teaching as a career choice.
Understand how teachers develop a professional reputation and obtain employment.
Describe and utilize the resources at Delaware County Community College that will assist them in achieving their career goal including advising, Career Center, Program Guides, resource meetings, Media Center, and PRAXIS information.
Develop a statement of their philosophy of teaching and learning that is research based.
Understand the diversity of students and student needs (educational, social, cultural, behavioral) and the responsibility of a classroom teacher to these needs.
Understand and analyze the major developments of the history of education, especially as they relate to school reform.
Use resources at DCCC to plan their educational program, choose a transfer institution, and identify the steps they need to take to complete a teacher education program.
Become a more reflective learner, with particular regard to personal skills and attitudes as they compare and contrast their readiness with the vocation of becoming a classroom teacher today.
Comprehend the practical aspects of education, including governance, politics, funding, law, and societal impacts.

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

EDU 206  Teaching with Technology  

This course is an introduction to online teaching and learning. Its purpose is to increase the student's understanding and awareness of online teaching styles and strategies, as they relate to today's technologies. This course will combine educational theory with computer-based activities to complement major course concepts. The course emphasizes practices, concepts and theories applicable to any level of teaching and/or online learning. Such knowledge will help students develop skills that will influence how they practice teaching with technology in either a classroom or online environment. NOTE: Students are expected to have basic knowledge of computer applications, have the ability to use an internet browser and have internet access.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of computers, networking, the Internet and World Wide Web as they relate to PK-college level education.
Discuss and critique issues related to use of computers in education, including security, equity, copyright and ethics of using the Internet in the classroom.
Identify and demonstrate the best practices associated with online materials, assessments, and evaluation.
Integrate technology in curriculum planning and in lesson delivery (PDE competency).
Develop an awareness of the use of technology to differentiate instruction for student populations such as special education students, English Language Learners, and gifted students.
Create an e-portfolio using the college system and using products developed in coursework.
Demonstrate the ability to access needed information effectively and efficiently.
Analyze administrative educational policies and properly incorporate and apply those policies when deisgning course assignments.
Identify the ethical, legal and socio-economic issues surrounding information and information technology.
Demonstrate an understanding of the research process by developing a research question, search strategy, and select appropriate research tools and resources.

College Academic Learning Goal Designation: Information Literacy (IL), Information Technology (TC)

Prerequisites: (ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075. Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

EDU 207  Foundations of Literacy PK-4  

This course is designed to prepare students for teaching reading using a balanced approach of various theoretical teaching models based on current research and knowledge. Through readings, lectures and class activities, students will develop a solid understanding of the reading process and how to construct and manage a classroom environment that promotes optimal literacy learning. Students will acquire knowledge about how to meet the diverse needs of learners at all stages of literacy development. In addition, students will learn how to formally and informally assess students to monitor reading progress and plan appropriate reading instruction.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Develop a philosophy of reading that reflects knowledge of the major theories of literacy development and instruction.
Understand that literacy is a developmental process that is emergent and continuously involved.
Demonstrate understanding of how personal beliefs and histories influence the teaching of reading.
Develop instructional activities that would engage students in shared reading, reading aloud, guided reading, shared writing, interactive writing and word study.
Observe, identify, learn and practice the different models and strategies for teaching comprehension instruction.
Observe, identify, learn and practice the different models and strategies for teaching word study instruction.
Understand how technology can be integrated into literacy instruction.
Design balanced literacy instruction that includes listening, speaking, reading comprehension, fluency development, writing, vocabulary and word study activities.
Use assessments to make informed decisions in literacy instruction.
Implement strategies for infusing literacy across content areas in a balanced literacy format.
Organize time, space, materials, and activities for differentiated literacy instruction in multicultural/multi-ethnic classrooms.

Prerequisites: ENG 112.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

EDU 208  English Language Learners  

This course focuses on the development of foundational knowledge for teacher education students to assist English language learners successfully in their future classrooms. Students will gain a basic understanding of the processes of second language acquisition and an understanding of the influence of culture on the educational process as viewed from current theoretical and pedagogical perspectives. The course content follows Pennsylvania Department of Education’s guidelines for pre-service teachers for meeting the instructional needs of English Language Learners. The basic premise of the course is that teachers play an important role in creating a positive classroom learning environment and bringing school success, especially for English language learners. Students will be supported to develop essential dispositions, skills, and knowledge to fulfill this important role while exploring the issues of culture, language, learning contexts, instruction and professionalism. Students will study these five major courses topics through courses readings, class discussions and cultural explorations of our own and others’ cultures while engaging in individual, social, and experiential learning opportunities together. NOTE: Students must have completed pre-reqs with a grade of 'C' or better; Recommended: Students should be able to read and understand the textbook, and have competent writing and organizational skills to allow them to complete assignments. Students should be able to use the internet for research

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of language systems, structures, functions, and variation.
Identify the process of acquiring multiple languages and literacy skills, including the general stages of language development.
Identify the differences between academic language and social language.
Identify socio-cultural characteristics of English language learners including educational background and demographics.
Describe how English language learners’ cultural communication styles and learning styles affect the learning process.
Describe how English language learners cultural values effect their academic achievement and language development.
Identify bias in instruction, materials and assessments.
Demonstrate cross-cultural competence in interactions with colleagues, administrators, school and community specialists, students and their families.
Observe culturally and/or linguistically diverse instructional settings.
Integrating research, concepts and theories of second language acquisition to plan customized instruction for English language learners.
Integrating the PA Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) for English Language Learners in PreK-12 grades to guide effective instructional planning and assessment.
Implement appropriate research based instructional strategies to make content comprehensible for all English language learners.
Using collaborative, co-teaching models for serving Engish language learners.
Demonstrating knowledge of the legal responsibilities as well as professional resources and organizations related to serving English language learners.
Identify issues related to standards based formative and summative assessments for all English learners.
Define common terms associated with English language learners.

Prerequisites: ECE 130 or EDU 110.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

EDU 215  Primary Grade Lab and Seminar  

This course will provide an orientation to various aspects of teaching in K-4 schools. Topics will include observation and use of assessment strategies and tools, planning developmentally and culturally appropriate curriculum, planning, effective instruction, classroom management strategies, discipline, and creating a responsive and engaging classroom environment the structure of the school. Field experiences will be related to course topics. Students will complete 60 hours of observation in the field. NOTE: Students must possess all background clearances including FBI Fingerprint, Pa Criminal, and Pa Child Abuse. In addition, students must have a certificate of completion for the Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse: Mandated and Permissive Reporting in Pennsylvania Online Training. Schools will require clearances prior to be the field placement. Additional fees are required. NOTE: Prerequisite: ENG 110 with grade of 'C' or higher.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Design classrooms, K - 4, that demonstrate appropriate use of indoor, physical space and materials; are educationally focused, respectful, and supportive to all children.
Design classrooms, K - 4, that are inclusive for diverse learners, including differences in age, development, culture.
Illustrate the use of Pennsylvania Learning Standards and implement lessons based on students’ stages of cognitive development, use of senses for exploration and understanding of the world, and development of age appropriate problem solving and critical thinking skills.
Develop curriculum that includes both planned and spontaneous experiences that are meaningful and challenging for all children that lead to positive learning outcomes and develop positive dispositions towards learning within each content area.
Analyze the connection between classroom arrangement and creating a positive climate for learning that leads to positive learning outcomes for students emphasizing the importance of engaging families in their child’s education.
Observe children and record behavior using authentic assessment strategies in order to understand the meaning and degree of variation and exceptionality among individuals.
Analyze the connection between classroom materials, learning standards, assessment, and instruction.
Use classroom assessment tools to inform teaching strategies.
Students will exhibit professional behavior aligned with NAEYC’s Code of Ethical Conduct.

Prerequisites: ENG 100 and (EDU 110 or ECE 130).

4 Credits4 Weekly Lecture Hours

EDU 220  Introduction to Special Education  

This course will provide an introduction to the field of special education, major provisions of special education law, and the legal mandates of the teacher serving children with disabilities in the least restrictive setting. It will also review the major needs of students with disabilities, including the effects of family demographics. Emphasis will be placed on working within special education team structures, recognizing inclusive practices, and discussing the various roles of professionals. NOTE Prerequisite: In addition, students must obtain the standard criminal background checks that are required for those who work in school settings. These include a fingerprint check, a Criminal Background Check (ACT 34) and Child Abuse History Clearance (ACT 151) prior to beginning the course. Background check forms are available on-line.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of identification, characteristics of different types of disabilities, as well as effective evidence-based instructional practices and adaptations.
Demonstrate understanding of the legal rights and responsibilities of the teacher for special education referral and evaluation and the rights and procedural safeguards that students are guaranteed.
Demonstrate an understanding of possible causes and implications for the over-representation of minorities in special education so as not to misinterpret behaviors that represent cultural, linguistic differences as indicative of learning problems.
Demonstrate and understanding of the components of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) process, with emphasis on understanding measurable goals based on present levels, specially designed instruction, adaptations, accommodations, supplementary aids and services, and supports for school personnel.
Identify essential concepts, best-practices and strategies for serving students with IEPs.

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and PSY 140.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours

SPA - Spanish

SPA 152  Spanish Practicum for Early Childhood Education  

Spanish Practicum for Early Childhood Education is a course designed to provide students with common Spanish terminology used in the early childhood education classroom and when interacting with families. In addition, students will be taught how to effectively communicate with Latinx children and families in Spanish.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
Use verbal and written communication to have meaningful and accurate conversations with parents and children.
Effectively communicate children’s health, safety, and nutrition needs in Spanish with Spanish speaking families.
Effectively communicate children’s developmental needs in Spanish with Spanish speaking families.
Self-assess one’s own biases and cultural competence to communicate effectively with families.
Identify cultural characteristics in Latinx cultures living in the United States.
Self-assess and adjust their communication style to build relationships with families of Latinx children using language that promotes trust.
Develop strategies for advocating for Latinx families within the educational community.

Prerequisites: SPA 101 and ((ENG 050 and REA 050) or ENG 099 or REA 075). Appropriate placement test scores may be accepted.

3 Credits3 Weekly Lecture Hours